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Possible surface grinder tool gloat?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    A related question...what is the easiest/best way to clean an used surface grinder?

    The few I have done in the past have been a real pain.

    TMT

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    That's referred to as "area effect oiling".

    I suspect I'll find this out in short order once I get my old flat-belt drill press going- no bearings, sealed or otherwise. Just babbitt, and a lot of little holes to dribble oil into... and for it to dribble back out of.

    Doc.

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  • EVguru
    replied
    I once heard a gun referred to as a device for shooting an innocent bystander 200 yards away, rather than the innocent bystander you were aiming at.

    Machine tool oil guns seem fall into a similar catagory, but in this case the innocent bystander is you and your surroundings!

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Originally posted by gunbuilder
    Doc, My Burke mill has fittings that look like grease zerks, but are for way oil.
    -The Nichols has the same thing; zerks everywhere, but they don't all get the same gun.

    The spindle is supposed to get a bearing grease (unless you have the "high speed" spindle, which gets an oil) while most of the rest of the table/knee gets an oil- but either way, it's applied with a grease gun through a zerk.

    I'm kind of mixing it a bit: I modded a trigger oiler with a grease gun connector, to pump oil into the ways. Turns out it doesn't quite have the oomph to push oil into the passages very easily, so I'll have to mod a grease gun like Greg did, one of these days.

    But for the moment, I use oil on the sliding parts (table and knee ways) but grease on the rotating parts (spindle, knee crank shaft, table handwheels, etc.)

    For this grinder, I'm using the usual Vactra way oil in the one-shot oiler (which does the spindle vertical ways, the saddle ways, and the cross-feed screw) but as above, I'll be looking for a light, thin grease for the ballways.

    Doc.

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  • gunbuilder
    replied
    Grease/ Oil

    Doc,
    My Burke mill has fittings that look like grease zerks, but are for way oil. If you are going to use grease ask around for "cornhead grease" it is a good deal lighter than regular gun grease. Made for the colder weather a corn combine gets used in.

    I would say try way oil first, if it works OK you are set, if not use grease. It is much harder to clean the grease off everything to try way oil.

    Thanks,
    Paul

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    The tag only says "grease", and specifies "about ten pumps"- then refers to the manual, which I don't have.

    I thought the same thing about the Nichols 'grease', as I have a Nichols. I was under the impression that calling that kind of heavy oil a 'grease' had dropped out of favor by the time this grinder was made (blind guess, mid eighties to early ninties) but that's just my uneducated impression.

    The smut I mopped out of the grooves when I cleaned the raceways was kind of in between- oily but also a little pasty. Was it grease that'd disassociated, or was it oil that'd dried a little?

    The one hint I can see is that the ends of the ballway channels have a bit of a gap to the bed casting. An oil would run out of these and drip on the floor, whereas a grease would 'fill' the channel and get up to the balls.

    As I said, I figure I'll go for a light, thin grease. Something that won't cause too much stiction, but will still be thick enough to stick and stay.

    Doc.

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  • Mcruff
    replied
    Our Okamoto ball way grinder recomends a very lite grease. The machine came equipped with a tube of it and you were suppose to relube it every so many hours of use.

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  • joeby
    replied
    Do they specify grease, or oil?

    The Nichols mills threads have gone back and forth over the same thing, and it turns out they recommend oil and not grease in the zerks.

    Grease may be too heavy for this application. Even oil can cause some grief for you on a small surface grinder. The pressure oilers can "float" the table on the cross-slide ways. This causes no problems if you are aware of it because it will settle back in rather quickly, but it's not a good idea to oil between finishing passes.

    Kevin

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    An update, for anyone interested: Finally got a corner of the shop cleared away enough to start placing, levelling and reassembling this badboy.



    Still a ways to go before I can light it up, but at least I have my pallet jack and car bay back now.

    The vacuum/coolant tank had the Sludge From Hell in it. Took half a gallon of gasoline, followed by half a gallon of Simple green to soften what the gas couldn't dissolve, and the assistance of an 11HP pressure washer to get it clean.

    Turns out the ballways have their own "oiler" in the form of two remote grease nipples on the back of the table. The tag says (in mild Engrish) to 'please give about ten pumps every few days' or some such, and says I should get more information from Page 17 of the manual.

    I figure I'll use a fairly thin grease. Anyone have any recommendations?

    Doc.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Tlc

    I have a surface grinder, a tool & cutter grinder and a universal grinder - all with ball ways under table on the the "X" ways/slides. Two have rack and pinion drive, and the other a cable drive. The cross slides are all vee and flat ways with a lead-screw. All have a conventional round or dove-tail column with a screw drive.

    As most have similar components as a gear-box, I use a good high-pressure hydraulic oil on everything - and it all works well.

    I have no power drives on mine so I have a real incentive and interest to keep "drag" down as far as possible - and it does.

    I run my slides through their limits and clean and re-oil them after and before use each time I use it.

    My grinders are in a hobby shop and never ever get anything like a "commercial" load or duration of load that a "commercial" or "production" shop would.

    Thrash, bash and hogging are not in the lexicon in my shop.

    Treat that machine with TLC and you will be well rewarded Doc.

    Nice find.

    Nicer restoration though!!

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Well, I don't think stiction will be too much of a problem on a ball-way machine... But looking at the pictures I took, it strikes me that most of the crud and buildup I wiped off was more swarf than grease, so I'm thinking the oil may be more correct than an actual grease.

    I need to see if there actually is a feed line from the one-shot oiler. That and see if I can dig up a manual.

    Doc.

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  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel
    When I go to set this table back together, what sort of oil or grease should I use? Way oil? Simple axle grease?
    I'm not sure this helps, but some kind of light-weight way oil.

    My Harig has a hydro-dynamic ways, where an oil pump floats the table ways, so they have a proprietary blend of No. 1 way oil with a ton of tackifiers in it. They warn that if you try to use conventional No. 1 oil you'll have problems with stiction, and I've seen posts on PM where folks tried to use No. 2 way oil, and it was like trying to feed the table through mud.

    But for a ball-way machine, I'd guess a No. 1 way oil. I'd bet if you post on PM, someone will have the manual for it.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Machine looks to be in decent shape.

    The table balls and cages just any good grease that won't cake/dry out/chaulk etc.I have had good luck with disc brake slider grease from the local car parts.Permatex makes it,it's thin,clear green in color and never dries(at least after five years on a T&C grinder.It also won't take much and not very often.

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Next quick question: The ways aren't fed by this machine's "one shot lube" pump- or at least, if they are, I can't yet find a delivery passage.

    When I go to set this table back together, what sort of oil or grease should I use? Way oil? Simple axle grease?

    Thanks.
    Doc.

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Boy, these things just fall right apart, don't they?



    Got it off the truck, which was kind of a trick seeing as there was absolutely no way to put a strap on the thing, except for maybe wrapping it around the spindle, and I didn't want to do that.

    But once down, I got the table off, sort of. I probably didn't use the 'proper' technique, but it worked. As noted above, it does indeed have replaceable steel rails for ways. They were pretty gunky with old grease and a fair to middlin' trace of grinding dust, but no peening, dings or dents, at least not in the roller ways.

    In these pics, I'd already wiped down the ways and ran the roller slides through the parts washer. It's just a preliminary cleaning to assess condition, for the moment.



    The balls look okay, though up close there's some fine scratches. But again, no obvious rust, no pitting, no scoring, no dents- at least on a quick check.



    That black spot just to the right of center isn't a dent, it was a speck of grit that probably came from some of the gunk still trapped in the "race" strip.

    The ways have a fairly uniform line running down the Vee:



    It appears consistent from end to end, and it's very fine. I can't feel it with a fingertip, it doesn't catch a fingernail or "scribe" (I used a piece of aluminum welding rod filed to a point) and doesn't show when straddled with a short straightedge and lit from behind.

    I may still do as recommended and replace the balls, but I'm relieved the ways look pretty good. Actually, everything looks good, apart from being filthy-grungy. Too bad I can't just get a spray bottle of Simple Green and a pressure washer...

    Doc.

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