Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Good old cutting oil

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Good old cutting oil

    I machine small stuff every once in a while (ie non-production) and don't use flood application of lubricants.

    Given the growth potential for soluble oil (another thread) and the small quantities that I would need I have been using WD40 Starrett M1 and various threading/tapping fluids.

    I was in a Princess Auto (Canada) today and was surprised to see a container of sulphuried & chlorinated dark cutting/threading oil. Does this still have a place? Indications for use? I am thinking of those situations where it would be the only suitable lube.

    If I were to switch to soluble oil can I mix small quantities ( smallest container at retail is ~4 litres) that would be sufficient for that project? Once the source container is opened (but not mixed with water) does it then have a finite shelf life? If yes, what would it be and is there any practical way to prolong it?

  • #2
    I have some Mobil soluble cutting oil -"use by 1998"... about 4 gallon left in a 5 gallon container. Still looks (and smells) great and works fine.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Dunc
      I machine small stuff every once in a while (ie non-production) and don't use flood application of lubricants.

      Given the growth potential for soluble oil (another thread) and the small quantities that I would need I have been using WD40 Starrett M1 and various threading/tapping fluids.

      I was in a Princess Auto (Canada) today and was surprised to see a container of sulphuried & chlorinated dark cutting/threading oil. Does this still have a place? Indications for use? I am thinking of those situations where it would be the only suitable lube.

      If I were to switch to soluble oil can I mix small quantities ( smallest container at retail is ~4 litres) that would be sufficient for that project? Once the source container is opened (but not mixed with water) does it then have a finite shelf life? If yes, what would it be and is there any practical way to prolong it?
      It is hard to beat dark sulfur cutting oil in many applications, imo. It works beautifully when tapping and *really* helps when cutting crappy mild steel. I can get smooth, nice finishes on even the nasty hot-rolled steel from big-box stores if I have the tool ground properly and I use sulfurized cutting oil. The WS-11 water soluble doesn't even come close. I've tried other water soluble coolants from work with similiar results. They work well, but not quite as good as the straight oil. (The more expensive water soluble stuff with EP additives might - I have yet to try these)

      The down side of this oil is that it doesn't do as good a job cooling things down. Also, it generates a lot of smoke that is hard on the lungs. So I keep a tin can of the sulfurized oil for mild steel or for tapping, single point threading, etc. Everything else is done with WS-11 solution.

      Comment


      • #4
        Quote: I was in a Princess Auto (Canada) today and was surprised to see a container of sulphuried & chlorinated dark cutting/threading oil. Does this still have a place? Indications for use? I am thinking of those situations where it would be the only suitable lube.

        Pretty hard to beat it for threading pipe.
        Byron Boucher
        Burnet, TX

        Comment


        • #5
          Old motor oil works very well. If you do your own oil changes your all set.
          Also the dark brown cutting oil used for threading pipe. I think Ridgid markets some under thier name. A gallon is about $10 last time I bought one. I have found that all the fancy expensive oils don't work any better.

          JL...................

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dunc
            I machine small stuff every once in a while (ie non-production) and don't use flood application of lubricants.

            Given the growth potential for soluble oil (another thread) and the small quantities that I would need I have been using WD40 Starrett M1 and various threading/tapping fluids.

            I was in a Princess Auto (Canada) today and was surprised to see a container of sulphuried & chlorinated dark cutting/threading oil. Does this still have a place? Indications for use? I am thinking of those situations where it would be the only suitable lube.

            If I were to switch to soluble oil can I mix small quantities ( smallest container at retail is ~4 litres) that would be sufficient for that project? Once the source container is opened (but not mixed with water) does it then have a finite shelf life? If yes, what would it be and is there any practical way to prolong it?
            I run the dark sulph oil for drilling, threading, and some turning, some milling. It's great stuff if the smell doesn't bother you. We also use it for blanking. 90 % of the time it's applied with a brush as need be for the job at hand. For your stated use it would be hard to beat, and certainly far far better than WD40 and or the various oils.

            Comment


            • #7
              Regarding the soluble oil, most of the older preparations, those that turn white when mixed with water, do have a shelf life that can vary according to how it is stored.

              A couple of brands that come to mind, and are essentially what is available today, were Sincool from Sinclair, and Crystex, from god knows who.

              Just had to throw in the last for historical purposes... back to shelf life.

              After talking to a petroleum rep. some years ago, I was apprised of a couple of no-no's when storing these coolant oils. The first, and foremost thing, was to store the oil in a temperature controlled environment. Read: a heated shop. Freezing can be death on the oil by causing the emulsifier to separate from the oil, leaving you with a pretty good grade of hydraulic oil that will defy all attempts at mixing with water.

              Such has happened to me with about two gallons of soluble left in the corner of my shop these past few years without benefit of heat. Checked it a few days ago and, sure enough, it won't mix. Not a total loss though, I figure I can use it to help start brush fires as I continue my property clean-up.

              The second precaution was that you need to ensure that the container is tightly sealed. Moisture in the air can slowly be absorbed by the emulsifier, which then slowly separates from the oil. Again, defying to mix with water.
              J.D. Leach
              http://thermionic.uuuq.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Fasttrack
                It is hard to beat dark sulfur cutting oil in many applications, imo. It works beautifully when tapping and *really* helps when cutting crappy mild steel. I can get smooth, nice finishes on even the nasty hot-rolled steel from big-box stores if I have the tool ground properly and I use sulfurized cutting oil. The WS-11 water soluble doesn't even come close. I've tried other water soluble coolants from work with similiar results. They work well, but not quite as good as the straight oil. (The more expensive water soluble stuff with EP additives might - I have yet to try these)

                The down side of this oil is that it doesn't do as good a job cooling things down. Also, it generates a lot of smoke that is hard on the lungs. So I keep a tin can of the sulfurized oil for mild steel or for tapping, single point threading, etc. Everything else is done with WS-11 solution.

                The dark, sulfurized cutting oil does work well. The downside is it makes a sticky mess and it will stain your metal tables after a while. I use it from time to time anyway.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like to think that the stain is actually a pleasant patina
                  J.D. Leach
                  http://thermionic.uuuq.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gnm109
                    The dark, sulfurized cutting oil does work well. The downside is it makes a sticky mess and it will stain your metal tables after a while. I use it from time to time anyway.

                    Good point. I also keep a glass jar of kerosene handy and try to clean up my machines on a regular basis. It is neccessary since my "good" machines sit in a farm shop and will get loaded with gritty gravel dust. I'm generally pretty anal about cleaning. Anyhow, as a product of this, the sulfurized oil never sits around for very long.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The original cutting oil of choice was Lard Oil, rendered from..... yep, pigs. It is still available and these days they call it...Lard oil.

                      LARD OIL

                      Champions Choice Premium Grade Lard Oil is a versatile cutting oil that can be used for machining, grinding and threading all types of pipes and plumbing fixtures (both ferrous and non-ferrous metals). This light-colored lard oil provides excellent lubricity for good finishes, free machining and extended tool life. Adding Premium Grade Lard Oil to conventional cutting oils improves finish and performance. Contains no harmful or potentially dangerous additives.

                      http://www.protectallindustrial.com/cutoils.htm
                      The big advantage is that you can use it on all metals. Sulphurized oil shouldn't be used on non ferrous metals. It's also biodegradable.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Evan
                        The original cutting oil of choice was Lard Oil, rendered from..... yep, pigs. It is still available and these days they call it...Lard oil.



                        The big advantage is that you can use it on all metals. Sulphurized oil shouldn't be used on non ferrous metals. It's also biodegradable.
                        you tell that to your average sewer worker !

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=th4g8...e=channel_page

                        all the best.markj

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Somewhere I have a recipe for making your own cutting oil. The mix is pretty simple really. You just combine certain percentages of a light petroleum oil (about 10W), an amount of vegetable oil, and some lard oil. Essentially the solution is the same as black cutting oil, sans the sulphur.
                          J.D. Leach
                          http://thermionic.uuuq.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Evan
                            Lard Oil..... . The big advantage is that you can use it on all metals.
                            Where do people buy it? Is it the regular lard sold in supermarkets (the one that is butter-like when refrigerated)?

                            How about those mixes of lard and mineral oils (as the above mentioned Champions Choice Premium Grade Lard Oil)? Where can they be purchased?

                            Thank you.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Someone mentioned in a previous post that a form of "lard oil" could be made by adding plain lard to lightweight non-detergent motor oil. I think it is about 1/3 lard:2/3 oil, heat until it disolves.
                              Busy Bee Tools sells a product called "Buttercut," derived from, you guessed it-butter! I have used it and it works very well. Not trying to be politically incorrect, but I suspect that Buttercut was developed to fill an urgent need. There are an awful lot of trained machinists out there in the world who WILL NOT touch products derived from pigs. Also, I suspect that there may be a large number who are the same way about products derived from cattle. Just a thought. Duffy
                              Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X