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OT: Computer and memory saver for changing batteries in car??

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  • OT: Computer and memory saver for changing batteries in car??

    Has anyone used one of these when changing batteries?

    http://www.ecklerscamaro.com/product...9&dept_id=1095



    What happens when you connect a 9-volt battery to a 12-volt system? Is there a diode in the memory saver to keep bad things from happening? I'd hate to stink up the car with magic smoke and battery guts.

    Roger
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    Is there a diode in the memory saver to keep bad things from happening?
    Who knows? Make your own and include a diode and a 470 ohm resistor in series with the battery.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      It should be fine.

      You have a computer that needs a 9 volt?

      I have this old deluxe universal thing that charges anything small, from 9 volt down to 3 volt buttons and 1.5 v D to AAA
      It plugs into the 110vac wall and dont blow things up yet.

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      • #4
        I don't understand why you would need this thing.
        What memory in a car?
        What computer in a car?
        The only thing I might think of is the security code for the radio, but hopefully you have that on a piece of paper somewhere.

        Snake oil.

        Benta.

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        • #5
          Satellite radio, clock, GPS, plus the engine control system all require standby power to retain settings. In particular if you take power away from the ECM it will have to relearn the driver's habits as well as recalibrate itself. The backup power only needs to be a few volts and the generally accepted standard for most manufacturers is to keep engine off standy power drain from the battery to below 20 milliamps.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            I made up one years ago. I just bought the 9v plug for 97 cents at Radio Shack and took apart an old cell phone car charger for the car power adapter plug and wired them together. Works a treat.

            Bill
            Last edited by Stu; 10-08-2009, 08:00 AM.

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            • #7
              better make sure your interia light is switched off with one of those ..or as soon as you open the door the 9 volt batt will be discharged in a few mins .

              all the best.markj

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              • #8
                No harm having 9-volts on a 12-volt system, think of where your battery voltage ends up at while turning the engine over on a -20° morning.
                The device supplies enough voltage and current to satisfy system requirements for the "hotel" loads that Evan described.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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                • #9
                  also ...my cars lighter socket does not work until the ignition is on .

                  all the best.markj
                  Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 10-08-2009, 08:56 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                    also ...my cars lighter socket does not work until the ignition is on .

                    all the best.markj
                    Yea. They aren't "lighter" sockets any longer theyre "accesory"
                    outlets. :-) or some such. BAH! I guess theyre just being, "P.C. :-)
                    ...lew...

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                    • #11
                      better make sure your interia light is switched off with one of those ..or as soon as you open the door the 9 volt batt will be discharged in a few mins
                      That is why I include a 470 ohm resistor in the circuit.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "Satellite radio, clock, GPS, plus the engine control system all require standby power to retain settings."
                        Satellite radio?
                        Clock: boohoohoo, I have to set the clock. My life is misery!
                        GPS: probably not, at most it would need to load a new Ephemeris. Takes a few minutes.
                        ECM: nope, non-volatile.

                        I wouldn't spend a cent on a gadget like that.

                        Benta.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The ECM is not non volatile. Disconnecting the battery will reset it.

                          We don't have the same type of radios here that you have. There are no sub channel frequencies or security codes on regular radios. Many people have satellite radios that recieve the same programming anywhere in North America.

                          (for Ford)
                          To reset the ECU you'll need to disconnect both battery cables, put the key in the ignition and turn it to the "accessory on" position (the last position before the car turns over) and leave it like that for about 20 minutes. Remove the key and reconnect the battery cables. If it's an ECU problem, that should fix it. Hope this helps.
                          http://en.allexperts.com/q/Ford-Repa...puter-2002.htm
                          How do you reset the ecu on a honda civic?

                          Answer
                          Draining the ECU of it's power is the way to do it. Simply disconnect the negative battery terminal and leave it disconnected for at least 15 minutes. Reconnect it and the ECU will reset itself the next time you start the car.

                          If you have a car stereo with a security code, unplugging the battery may require you to enter the code. Be sure you have it ready.


                          http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you..._a_honda_civic
                          Most are the same. The ECM/ECU has a backup capacitor to keep the NVM alive but once it is discharged the settings are gone.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            True there is a bit of fluff there that isn't essential.

                            The ECM while non-volatile in it's primary programing does store trouble codes and a certain amount of history to "learn" how the vehicle is operated in order to optimize how it can most enhance the fuel, ignition and shift maps for ideal operating parameters. Without this retained volatile memory, each time the battery is taken out of circuit it has to relearn the particular operating characteristics unique to every vehicle and driver.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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                            • #15
                              Why don't you just hook up a battery charger to the car when you change the battery?
                              Is that too simple or am I missing something??

                              --Doozer
                              DZER

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