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Brown & Sharpe No. 0 Omniversal value???

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  • Brown & Sharpe No. 0 Omniversal value???

    about mid-40s vintage. looks to be in pretty good shape. i would definitely have to get a manual for this as it has more controls than i've ever seen. it is 3-phase (of course) so i'd need to get a converter. any idea on what one of these would be worth with no tooling? what about weight? 2000 lbs? 3000 lbs?

    andy b.
    The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

  • #2
    My 1935 catalog lists it as 3000# net weight.
    I see this type of machine go at auction for junk price or less, seldom much more. It is worth however much you are willing to pay for it.
    It could be a very useful, versatile machine if it is in good condition. Lots of potential for worn or broken parts too. Hard to find parts if needed.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      These type machines are frequently sold at auction in the $25 range. That doesn't necessarily mean they're worthless, just that most of us don't have shop space since we do most operations on CNC's now.

      Also, beware some of these older machines had B&S tapers in the spindles. Tooling is not as readily available as for more common tapers.

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      • #4
        thanks!
        i don't recall seeing many of them anywhere for sale, and yes, it has the proprietary B&S taper.
        they were trying to get a good bit more than $25, and it sounds like if i'm spending what they wanted i should just look elsewhere for something a bit more standard.

        thanks again,
        andy b.
        The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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        • #5
          andy_b:
          If you have the room and it is in good shape - buy it cheap and laugh all the way home. The spindle is large enough that you probably can change it over to a R-8 or NT40 for a greater variety of tooling. I would not count on finding a manual, you might have better luck finding Browne & Sharpes "Treatise on Machining" book - jam packed with good stuff.

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          • #6
            Are you talking about a B & S Universal Mill size 0 with universal table ?(for cutting tapered worm gears ie. )
            Got out bid for a very nice one in 1985 in California...went for 2250 and no tooling.
            Missed a shot in 1991 in Wisconsin (I was laid up at the time) for 1500 ..with vice.
            our local tech college had one with some tooling, but it was beat up (war model on loan ?) and it went for 850 4 years ago...I didn't like the oil leaks it had.

            If they are going for 25 $, thats a heck of a deal in my book, in fact anything under 600 is a good deal. When you want to remove stock, a horizontal makes a vertical look sick !

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            • #7
              Smallest Universal Mill my B&S catalog shows is a 1A. The Omniversal does all the Universal does and more. It is about 1/2 the size. It is quite a machine actually, it originally came with a Universal Dividing head and Universal Milling head that incorporated vertical mill function as well.
              Unfortunately, around here, these machines will go for a penny a pound at auction on a good day. Weight, size, and CNC have made them dinosaurs. Parts availablity is also a major consideration.
              They are in the same class as large shapers, great if you have the space available, and a use for them, but you will not make money on them in a working machine shop.
              Take a look at sale prices, $2250 in 1985, $1500 in 1991, $850 in 1999, notice a trend there?
              Jim H.

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