Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help Bring An Old Bradford 16 Back To Life!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help Bring An Old Bradford 16 Back To Life!

    Rather than post different threads for each phase of this project, I'll make this a continuous one. So far a new motor has been installed, and the entire gear train up to the lead screw and feed rod has been removed for cleaning and inspection.

    Everything looks good except this pinion gear. What's the best solution
    for this problem? I've never cut a gear, but this looks like a simple one to try.


  • #2
    Looks almost like you could pull it off and flip it around...

    Looks simple enough to make. Find out what pitch it is, Probably 14.5 Deg Pressure angle. Count number of teeth and order up a cutter.

    If you don't have a dividing head, you do have a usable gear to make a simple indexer with...

    Comment


    • #3
      I haven't taken it off yet to see if it could be reversed. It's wide because the gear it drives can encounter it on the left side, center, or right side depending on the speed range needed at the lead screw and feed rod. I'll post a photo of that setup when I get it back together.

      I have a Kearney & Trecker dividing head, tailstock and a Gorton I-22 and would like to put them to use for this project.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thought I'd give the pinion gear the old flip around the other way treatment today and found that it's all one piece. I found this odd considering the nut and knurled piece that looked like it was holding the gear on the shaft. It was cleaned, buffed with a small wire wheel and inspected with a 10X magnifier.

        Looks like all one piece into the gearhead, ending with the retainer nut shown in the last picture.

        1. Pinion gear with knurled collar and nut.


        2. Pinion gear with knurled collar and nut removed.


        3. Pinion gear shaft inside gearhead.



        What does that knurled collar and nut do?

        Can the gear be spray welded an re-cut?
        Last edited by Spindle; 11-07-2009, 06:34 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Seems silly to build it as one piece then add the nut, collar, and key for camoflage. I'd be very tempted to gently try it in a press-the collar MAY have peened and hidden the joint. Tough call.

          I think this is a shaky application for spray weld.

          Scott

          Comment


          • #6
            I think the end of the shaft is intended for additional gears for metric threading or other pitches not included in the gearbox. You can certainly make a new shaft and gear but you might be surprised how long that gear will run satisfactorily if you keep it clean and well lubed. Don't let that hold you up from getting the lathe operational. The wear will have no effect on anything you do with the lathe. You could probably make a new shaft or turn the gears off the existing shaft and fit a pair of stock gears on it.
            Don Young

            Comment


            • #7
              I would run it as is, and start thinking about a repair after it is up and running...

              The gear could be turned down and remaining shaft keyed like outer end.

              But a whole new shaft/gear would be stronger.

              Possibly the outer keyed area was for a high lead/Helix attachment.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'll run it as it is after removal to blueprint it. That may be the first project for this lathe.

                On to the next thing:

                What's the correct clearance for the QC Gearbox gears? Can plastigauge be used for this?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Slow running, well worn, straight cut change gears...

                  Not too tight, you will lose teeth.

                  Not so loose that they are noisy...

                  I would set up so just a tiny bit of backlash between each pair.

                  It looks like each pairs engagement is controlled by threaded balls near shift gate.

                  Not really a plastigage level adjustment. When setting up gears, a Dial Indicator is the usual tool used Also various potions spread on teeth, to examine tooth contact patterns...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One quick & dirty method of setting clearance on change gears is to simply run a piece of newspaper between them, tighten things down, then rotate the gear train to remove the paper. Presto! Proper clearance, not too tight, not too loose.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jdunmyer
                      One quick & dirty method of setting clearance on change gears is to simply run a piece of newspaper between them, tighten things down, then rotate the gear train to remove the paper. Presto! Proper clearance, not too tight, not too loose.
                      Brilliant! I'm going to try that on my next change gear shift! Different wieghts of paper to get the "just right" clearance...
                      Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'll give the paper trick a try, then measure the resulting lash to see what it is. Once I get the belt guards, gear box, gear head and pedestal stripped and painted we can move on to the carriage. So far I've noticed the keys that engage the feed rod slot have worn almost completely away and will need to be replaced.

                        Did the factory provide some type of spanner to remove the chuck, or how was this done?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Camdigger,
                          The backlash on those change gears isn't that critical, a piece of newspaper will be "just right". You aren't setting up the differential gears in your truck. :-)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Beats how I have been doing it... Jam it tight, move back a smidgen, tighten down. Put up with geartrain noise until the next change. Repeat, trying for different size smidgen....
                            Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Today's work produced the following questions:

                              1. Does anyone have a manual for this model Bradford 16 with the clutch lever on top of the head?

                              The manual I have is for this model with the clutch lever down low, and a different QC gearbox.



                              2. My manual describes oil filter disks and a screen behind the sight glass in the head. Mine has the glass, but no screen or filters behind it. I think there's an oil pump in there due to the presence of this tube. A pump with no screen or filter?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X