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  • american made?

    I have read many posts on this site which complain about manufacturing jobs going to other countries. I have also read many posts discussing the cheap and effective import tools that have been purchased.

    You cannot make $25.00 and hour as a machinist buy $25.00 calipers (or any other cheap tool) and demand %12 annual return on your 401k and expect to keep manufacturing jobs in the U.S. .

  • #2
    Yup. have your cake and eat it too. It's a dliemma and I sure don't have an answer.

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    • #3
      .

      [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 11-16-2003).]

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      • #4
        Small companies also fill niche markets that the larger ones ignore due to low profit margins.

        I tried to find a large (10 inch +) trolling lure for Lake Trout. I found out that outside of big lures for muskies, it is a very small market. I had to make them myself and am now the president of the Pelagic Bait Fish Tackle Company.

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        • #5
          .

          [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 11-16-2003).]

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          • #6
            I have worked for General Motors for 28 yrs. When I started GM had 52% of the market, they had around 900,000 workers. GM today has about 150,000 employed. We blame the loss of workers of Japanese imports. Not true. The imports only filled a market that was being over looked. GM today tries to hang on to a 28% market share. They are competing in the markets now but were forced to this because they didn't listen to the buyers. 900,000 workers buy a lot of cars, 150,000 workers buy a lot less.
            You can't fault buyers for trying to get the most for their hard earned money. American companies didn't listen until it was too late. Now they are trying to catch up, but most of them are only moving to get cheaper labor and laying off the people that would buy their products.
            Some day the cheap labor will dry up but no one will be making enough money to buy the product. One big mess and no way out. With World markets will come World order and then where do we go from there?

            Sorry for the long post but had to vent. Ron
            Freedom is not free

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            • #7
              I have worked for General Motors for 28 yrs. When I started GM had 52% of the market, they had around 900,000 workers. GM today has about 150,000 employed. We blame the loss of workers on Japanese imports. Not true. The imports only filled a market that was being overlooked. GM today tries to hang on to a 28% market share. They are competing in the markets now but were forced to this because they didn't listen to the buyers. 900,000 workers buy a lot of cars, 150,000 workers buy a lot less.
              You can't fault buyers for trying to get the most for their hard earned money. American companies didn't listen until it was too late. Now they are trying to catch up, but most of them are only moving to get cheaper labor and laying off the people that would buy their products.
              Some day the cheap labor will dry up but no one will be making enough money to buy the product. One big mess and no way out. With World markets will come World order and then where do we go from there?

              Sorry for the long post but had to vent. Ron
              Freedom is not free

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              • #8
                .

                [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 11-16-2003).]

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                • #9
                  It's all about greed! Why is the US government allowing big companies (like Microsoft, Intel etc) set up shop in Inda and China!

                  Read an article in the summer that said they pay a US engineer about $65/hr in wages and benefits. They can now get the same done in India for about $20/hr US!

                  Why don't they penalize these companies more since most of the money is going off shore anyway? More taxes, tariffs or something? That way it forces them to keep some jobs here??

                  That's what the US did to Canadian softwood. Big ass 20% + tariff, slapped on our wood.

                  Competing is on thing, but when the playing field is not level (cheap labour there), that's a different story. I see industialized nations becoming more of a 3rd world country in the future, as countries like China grow in power!

                  I totally agree with the statement that people who are out of work will not be in a purchasing position for goods. What goes around comes around.

                  ------------------

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                  • #10
                    pgmrdan;
                    I am a one man operation with a one model product line.
                    I make a common pelagic bait fish lure called the Lake Whitefish. It comes in two sizes with two different hook options.
                    They are pricey but they work. The lures are made from plate aluminum and Eastern White Cedar. They are built to last.

                    I agree about the difficulty of beating the price of mass produced flies but it is another crystal clear example of 'You get what you pay for!'

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                    • #11
                      There's another problem with making things in the USA. INSURANCE! Make that $25 caliper and if someone pokes themselves in the eye with it, they sue you for a bazzilion dollars for not having adequate instructions or safety notices.

                      Here in Texas, we just passed a referendum that limits punitive damages to $750k. That's a start. Maybe "suits" won't be in such a hurry to file FAT or IDIOT damages.

                      Ken

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                      • #12
                        Jason: you say "Competing is on thing, but when the playing field is not level (cheap labour there), that's a different story. I see industialized nations becoming more of a 3rd world country in the future, as countries like China grow in power!"

                        The USA has become a sort of 3rd world country or colony. When a country sends it's raw materials to another country for processing and return, it is almost by definition, a 3rd world type country.

                        There are only a few wealth producing activities, agriculture, mining, manufacturing, and , most important education. I may have missed a few, but things like transportation, hamburger flipping, lawyers, politicians are just recirculating the money. We have lost so much Ground on manufacturing and education that I fear for our way of life.

                        Steve


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                        • #13
                          Funny how some people want to blame the hourly worker for the jobs going overseas. I mean, hey, we should be glad to work for peanuts while the execs sit on their asses for millions a year. I mean, who are we? We're just the ones who do the work and make up the companies and keep the execs employed.
                          Why the hell should we expect a good wage for a job well done? One of the big problems is the pay differential between the highest paid hourly worker and the top execs at any given American company. The execs play golf, have martini lunches, and screw the secretaries, while getting millions a year plus million dollar bonuses. They then have the gall to tell us that we expect to much and they just can't afford to keep manufacturing here in the states.
                          I quit buying Husky and Stanley tools about 3 years ago, when I found out they were back to having them made in Mexico, China, and Taiwan. They get the tools made overseas for a fraction of the cost of making them here, but do they pass the savings on to the consumer? Hell no. They charge as much if not more for then now than they did when they were made in the USA, even though the quality and manufacturing cost are much lower.
                          I have always supported buying only those tools that are made in the USA, partly because we make the best tools for the best price, and partly because it keeps jobs here in the States. Yes I have bought products made in China over the past 13 years, and NO I have not been very satisfied with the quality. It seems harder and harder to get a decent quality anything anymore. Seems everything is now a Cheaply made Chaiwanese or Mexican POS.
                          BTW, I never minded paying more for American or Canadian quality. A good product that cost more is still a good product. A cheap POS is still a POS and will cost you much more through replacement costs.
                          Sorry about the longwinded rant. I sure get sick of people blaming the workers for what corrupt politicians and greedy businessmen do. Guess I'll go and see how hard it is to shove that camel through the eye of a needle.

                          Guess this is what happens when lawyers and greedy rich bastards run a country.
                          What a shame to watch this once great land go down the toilet.

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                          • #14
                            Jaymo, sometimes we have no choice but to buy non-USA made products.
                            If your vehicle is a 1985 or newer, chances are there's more foreign parts in it than "Made in USA" parts. Do we buy Toyota? They're assembled here but the parts are not made here. Most Chevy, Ford and Chrysler's are assembled here but most parts are NOT made here. Check the list of origins on the window sticker. Chances are, it's longer than the options list.
                            Go to any store and try to find "Made in USA" products. The pickens are slim. You can't even go grocery shopping and walk out with all USA products.
                            There's just no way to be completely American and live the way we do. Many products are not there.

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                            • #15
                              You can start by not even entering a Wal-Mart.

                              If you go in, and randomly sample 100 items throughout the store, and if you can even find 10 made in USA I will be very surprised.

                              I think they deliberately have a "no USA products" policy. If not political, it is economic.

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