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My "new to me", not so new Worthington air compressor

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  • My "new to me", not so new Worthington air compressor

    Motor is only 1.5 horse 10.6amp.... but its single phase...Owner said that it will run the pump... Was in a shop setting used for spray painting...

    I have a 5hp Allis Chalmers motor that would probably work much better, but its 3ph.. have to work on that...

    I only paid $125 for it...




    Last edited by cuemaker; 10-17-2009, 10:29 PM.

  • #2
    Nice score. Did you plug it in yet?

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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    • #3
      Not yet..as soon as I got it home had to run to inlaws... Also need to run a 220 line to the garage... should get that accomplished tomorrow...

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      • #4
        Vessel Test.

        Originally posted by cuemaker
        Not yet..as soon as I got it home had to run to inlaws... Also need to run a 220 line to the garage... should get that accomplished tomorrow...
        WARNING!!!

        Hydro Test that cylinder before you use it!!

        Test to 1 1/2 times DESIGN Pressure

        It may be badly corroded inside.

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        • #5
          Well, it runs... The little 10.6amp 1.5hp motor had no trouble starting it up.... Bearings in the motor squeal something fierce...

          The fly wheel ran backwards I think.. the front scoop part of the blades of the fly wheel were running backwards, so the air blew away from the piston... Could this be why the little motor ran it so easily??

          Otherwise, only took it about 2-3mins (wasnt paying attention to time) to get to 65psi... then the noise became so bad I had to turn it off... will see how long it will hold at 65psi...

          Other notes, the tank says its a Curtis, made in 1946 in St. Louis, MO. Max WD is 200lbs, Max temp is 400deg F... Plus other info which I think are model numbers..

          So a few questions...

          1. Can bearings be replaced in a motor and is it difficult?
          2. Does it matter which way the fly wheel turns?
          3. I really didnt expect the motor to turn this.. could it be that backwards is easier than frontwards (sounds like a stupid question to me, but I am not very knowledgeable)

          Oh, and big thanks to Rockrat... gave me good advice.. Had to install a sub panel to get this all going....

          Thanks
          Last edited by cuemaker; 10-18-2009, 09:07 PM.

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          • #6
            Well, down to almost 55psi... found 2 leaks at pipe joints... easily fixable...

            No one can help me with my question?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cuemaker
              Well, it runs... The little 10.6amp 1.5hp motor had no trouble starting it up.... Bearings in the motor squeal something fierce...

              The fly wheel ran backwards I think.. the front scoop part of the blades of the fly wheel were running backwards, so the air blew away from the piston... Could this be why the little motor ran it so easily??

              Otherwise, only took it about 2-3mins (wasnt paying attention to time) to get to 65psi... then the noise became so bad I had to turn it off... will see how long it will hold at 65psi...

              Other notes, the tank says its a Curtis, made in 1946 in St. Louis, MO. Max WD is 200lbs, Max temp is 400deg F... Plus other info which I think are model numbers..

              So a few questions...

              1. Can bearings be replaced in a motor and is it difficult?
              2. Does it matter which way the fly wheel turns?
              3. I really didnt expect the motor to turn this.. could it be that backwards is easier than frontwards (sounds like a stupid question to me, but I am not very knowledgeable)

              Oh, and big thanks to Rockrat... gave me good advice.. Had to install a sub panel to get this all going....

              Thanks
              #1 Yes,you will have to remove both endbells and pull the bearings off the shaft.Be careful of the centrifugal switch which should be in the rear endbell.Those are usually made from Bakelite or other brittle plastic and don't like to be yanked,dropped,bumped etc.

              #2 Yes,there should be an arrow cast into the flywheel telling you the direction.The flywheel should rotate so the fan blades blow air over the compressor cylinders.Motor leads to swap should be 5&8 to reverse the motor.

              #3Probably,but it depends on what the HP requirement is on that model pump and what speed it is turning at.2hp may run it very well if your not expecting 175psi and 20cfm from it.

              It's a Frankenstien compressor,the tank is from a Curtiss compressor,the Pump is a Worthington and the motor is a Layingaround.

              The unloader is plumbed wrong(the line connecting both heads and the tank together)it should connect both heads and then on to an unloder valve on the side of the pressure switch.If there is no unloader valve on the switch simply connect the two heads with one piece of line and drill a #65 hole in the line.That will unload the heads after cutoff while not losing significant air.

              Is there a tank drain?

              I also don't see a check valve in the tank.

              With some work you'll have a jam up good compressor.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                You have a two stage pump, that is why the cylinders are two different sizes and they are not piped correctly.

                Patrick

                Also what the 2S is on the plate.
                From all the views we see the motor should be running CCW.
                Last edited by HSS; 10-18-2009, 11:10 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wierdscience
                  The unloader is plumbed wrong(the line connecting both heads and the tank together)it should connect both heads and then on to an unloder valve on the side of the pressure switch.If there is no unloader valve on the switch simply connect the two heads with one piece of line and drill a #65 hole in the line.That will unload the heads after cutoff while not losing significant air.

                  Is there a tank drain?

                  I also don't see a check valve in the tank.

                  With some work you'll have a jam up good compressor.

                  I thought it was plumbed weird.. but wasnt sure..My pictures show everything that is there. Also, I have no clue what parts you described, I do better with that thingy there needs to go over here, etc. Or at least a definition of my parts...

                  No tank drain but would like one.....do they have to be welded in?

                  Check valve... While I am not sure, I thought it was the thingy on the end under the plastic box (pressure switch?)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cuemaker
                    I thought it was plumbed weird.. but wasnt sure..My pictures show everything that is there. Also, I have no clue what parts you described, I do better with that thingy there needs to go over here, etc. Or at least a definition of my parts...

                    No tank drain but would like one.....do they have to be welded in?

                    Check valve... While I am not sure, I thought it was the thingy on the end under the plastic box (pressure switch?)
                    Okay,the tank drain usually threads into a threaded bung located on the bottom of the tank.There definately should be a bung there or at very least a hole tapped for pipe thread.

                    The line running from the HP(smaller) cylinder to the tank is where the check valve should be.It will thread directly into the tank and the line should connect to it.It should look like this-

                    http://www.wholesalecompressorparts....pt-p-3728.html

                    The thing directly bottom from the pressure switch is the pop-off valve AKA saftey valve.It's installed very wrong.Those should never be installed upside down like that,they fill up with crud and cease to function.They should be installed vertical or at least horizonal.
                    Last edited by wierdscience; 10-18-2009, 11:18 PM.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It looks to me that they were sending air from the 1st stage (big cylinder) to the tank and to the second stage at the same time. I guess they didn't need as high a pressure as the pump was capable of. You will have to change that or you will need 2 check valves. Also the intercooler is connected between the high stage and the tank to help cool the air before it enters the tank.

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                      • #12
                        Okay plumbing in general.

                        The fittings on the left side below the compressor pump should be removed and the large hole plugged like the one on the right.Those two big plugs are actually inspection ports.

                        The fitting in the end of the tank where the pressure switch is now should be the service port(where the air is tapped off for use.)

                        The top port where the line heads into the tank.That should have starting at the tank a check valve MNPT on the tank side FNPT on the pump side.Then a NPT cross.In the top of the cross should go the air line from the compressor head.In the two branches of the cross one should have the pressure switch and the other the saftey valve.

                        Pressure gauge can be mounted anywhere after the service port that is convenient for you.
                        Last edited by wierdscience; 10-18-2009, 11:29 PM.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What about the tee in the 1st stage head?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wierdscience
                            Okay plumbing in general.

                            The fittings on the left side below the compressor pump should be removed and the large hole plugged like the one on the right.Those two big plugs are actually inspection ports.
                            Ok, understand that.

                            Originally posted by wierdscience
                            The fitting in the end of the tank where the pressure switch is now should be the service port(where the air is tapped off for use.)
                            Ok, so remove the pressure switch, move to as you describe below..

                            Originally posted by wierdscience
                            The top port where the line heads into the tank.That should have starting at the tank a check valve MNPT on the tank side FNPT on the pump side.Then a NPT cross.In the top of the cross should go the air line from the compressor head.In the two branches of the cross one should have the pressure switch and the other the saftey valve.
                            Ok..let me re-describe to make sure I understand.....Remove the junk that is there. Starting at tank, install a check valve, then a cross. The air comes in from the compressor head to the top of the cross. On the arms of the cross go the pressure switch and on the other side the safte valve (a new one?)

                            Originally posted by wierdscience
                            Pressure gauge can be mounted anywhere after the service port that is convenient for you.
                            Kind of lost me on the last one...install it on the end of the tank where I would plug in the hose's??

                            Also, checked the arrow, for sure running backwards....would it be easier to switch the motor and the compressor heads ?

                            For sure not holes on the bottom of the tank, anywhere.. all smooth

                            Is everthing else plumbed ok?

                            Thank you so much to both of you for helping..

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                            • #15
                              Yeah the plumbing has been hacked pretty bad.
                              Good advice so far to correct this problem.

                              Just wanted to add that looking at the third photo, and looking at the angle of the pulley/flywheel fan blades, the direction of rotation should be clockwise as viewed from the pulley side.

                              Shouldn't the unloader valves be at the top of each head?
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

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