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  • #16
    Originally posted by dp
    Cheese capital of the central coast. Used to go there for weekend breakfasts when I lived in Santa Maria. Always loved the drive from there to Santa Barbara over the inland route via San Marcos pass.
    That is a nice drive... I used to commute that 5 days a week. Now I work from home. I like that better

    Where'd ya go for breakfast?

    -Pete
    I just like to make stuff.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by keelan
      Short answer: You're Wrong. Longer answer, DNS forwarding would be an unnecessary complication. The page being served up was a default page (Fedora for a production server? Yikes.) A replacement for that default page would be all that was needed. Any DNS changes risk problems with cached records messing things up well after the maintenance is complete. Shaw's DNS servers are notorious for this.

      Someone had to light the Evan fuse

      All in good humor, my geographically semi-co-located fellow metal mangler.

      Anyway, glad it is back.
      Having worked for a number of large dot com's it is common practice to put a "by-pass" page in place to let the rank and file know there is nothing wrong with their set. A by-pass page is just a simple webpage that sez the site is stone cold dead, or words to that effect.

      Sometimes, though, there will be a server relocation that involves a new IP like when you move your site from Denver to Chandler. I try to overlap systems so this happens painlessly, but the object is to mirror the two sites, set the DNS TTL to a matter of minutes, turn on the new site, cut over DNS, let the new site start accepting connections, then shut down the old site and replace all pages with appropriate redirects to the new site. All usually within a matter of minutes for interactive - wouldn't do to have a new post on the old site. In this situation DNS is a major player. The bad news is some large ISP's re-write the TTL time of YOUR DNS and cache stale lookups. That prolongs any proper cutovers - for very large sites this is a problem. For MomNPop.com it's not such a big deal.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Pete F
        That is a nice drive... I used to commute that 5 days a week. Now I work from home. I like that better

        Where'd ya go for breakfast?

        -Pete
        Wish I could remember - was on the south side of the road, in town, and that's about all I can recall. It was 1970 when I lived there. I also used to stop into PeaSoup Andersen's in what, Buellton was it? The birthplace of Happea and Pea-Wee. Another happy Dane story.

        I used to like my commute when it was from the bedroom to the kitchen. I miss retirement!
        Last edited by dp; 10-21-2009, 01:58 AM.

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        • #19
          Short answer: You're Wrong. Longer answer, DNS forwarding would be an unnecessary complication. The page being served up was a default page (Fedora for a production server? Yikes.) A replacement for that default page would be all that was needed. Any DNS changes risk problems with cached records messing things up well after the maintenance is complete. Shaw's DNS servers are notorious for this.
          Short reply: you missed something. That page wasn't necessarily coming from the regular Village Press server.

          All of the major DNS providers include DNS forwarding as a part of the package. It's also included in most major server packages that provide DNS services. There is nothing complicated about it and the DNS occurs as per normal. Caching issues exist anyway both at the client side and on the WAN.

          Shaw's network configuration is both non standard and non optimal.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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