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  • OTMT Super 3X Mill

    Do any of you folks own/use one of these mills? I'd like to get some in-put from you as I am in the market for a small dove-tail column mill. Of course, I'd like a Bridgeport or Clausing, but the Shop ceiling is too low to handle one. TIA

  • #2
    Just had a couple of the new models sent over as demo machines, far , far better than the original ones they turned out, in fact the original ones were total rubbish, we had two and scrapped both. When I say scrapped they were sold on in a stripped state to two people who wanted the castings for CNC conversions.

    Anyway the new machines can be recognised by a screwed locking devise in the right hand side of the head that allows the head to lock in the vertical and not rely on the scale.

    Spindle is powered by a 1000w 3 phase brushless motor with encoder feedback to the spindle board and it does have bangs of grunt at low revs.

    See this test of drilling a 1" hole at 150 rpm

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOj2oUOIuLk

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      If your shop ceiling is to low, There are other 'large sale' mills to consider, like the RF or IH mill. https://www.machinetoolswarehouse.co...2&bestseller=Y
      is an IH mill. they also have an RF45 clone for a little cheaper.

      Warning they do still need a decent ceiling height if you wanna use the stock stand and have all the Z travel on the mill (the motor sticks up a foot at the top of the Z) but you can make a custom 'short' stand and just do your milling on a short stool (or convert to CNC)


      Nice hole test though.
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        Thanks,
        The first test which hasn't been uploaded to Youtube because the damn guard got in the way was of the swathe you can see on the test piece.

        Basically we were testing what was on the maker plate and it says drill up to 25mm [ we cheated with 25.4 ] Face milling up to 50mm.

        For the face mill I tool a brand new 50mm face mill out of stores and bolted the plate to the bed, slag offcuts and all.
        Speed was set to 720 rpm depth of cut was set to 1mm and seeing as it wasn't my machine or tooling I cranked this thru as fast as I could.

        Sounds a bit severe and brutal but you can bet someone will try it, went straight thru, revs dipped to about 700 then spun back up to 720 as the encoder clicked in.

        Plate says it can tap up to M12 which is quite course, about 1/2" x 13 UNC but we had a problem in that we were struggling to hold the tap and didn't have a collet chuck for the tap at this point. All it wanted to do was spin the tap shank.

        Dropped back to 7/16" UNF and it went straight in and backed out again, I'm not wholly convinced it will do M12, new tap, soft material OK ? but steel and a less than new tap, I don't think so.

        .
        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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        • #5
          Thanks, fellows, I still have a lot of thinking to do about it!

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          • #6
            The Sieg "Super X3" mill - a comment and comparison

            Originally posted by Al Messer
            Do any of you folks own/use one of these mills? I'd like to get some in-put from you as I am in the market for a small dove-tail column mill. Of course, I'd like a Bridgeport or Clausing, but the Shop ceiling is too low to handle one. TIA
            Hi Al.

            I have both the "standard" Sieg X3 mill:
            https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pr...stockCode=M153

            and the Super X3:
            https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pr...stockCode=M155

            I bought the X3 to be converted to CNC - which has taken a while but is not too far off - delayed for several reasons, none of which are related to the machine or the CNC kit.

            I was so impressed with the X3 that I bought the Super X3 recently (it has been unpacked and needs the packing grease etc. removed. I've run it and it is superb too. I want it as a smaller "manual only" mill.

            I had an excellent mill attached to my 3-in-1 machine, but as I no longer need the milling attachment (it is in the trailer now - going to the dump this week-end). It frees up my lathe so that I can fit the taper-turning attachment to it.

            I also have a HF-45 mill as well - so all in all I have three vertical dove-tail mills that seems to cover the discussion and your requirements thus far. The HF-45 is a very good mill and is robust and accurate with plenty of "head-room".

            The X3's are pretty well provided for in the "head-room" department as well.

            The X3's have a 2mm (~0.080") pitch lead-screw on "X" and "Y" with a 1mm (~0.040") rise/fall per turn on "Z" (the column dove-tail).

            I fitted the power feed to the "X" feed on my X3 and will be changing it over to the Super X3. The "Z" feed is a bit time-consuming but I am used to it. A power drill connected to the "Z" hand-wheel or drive will help a good bit in that regard.

            Both Sieg X3's are really solid machines for their size - they are a small mill after all.

            The reason I bought the X3 for CNC conversion was that the tilting (left-right) head was not needed nor was the DRO on the quill as the quill is locked for CNC-ing as the "Z" drive does all the vertical work.

            I bought the Super X3 for "manual" as I like the tilting head for the very few times it is needed. The speed control is excellent - step-less from 100>1900RPM.

            The X3 will have a "speed-doubler" kit fitted as well so as to take the speed up to 4,000RPM.

            Both mills have plenty of power/"grunt" through-out the full speed range.

            The X3's will take a 6" rotary table and a 10" x 7" tilting angle plate as well (the 7" x 5" is really too small).

            They are excellent small mills.

            If you require, I will post some pics of the X3 with a scale rule as well as the rotary table and the tilting table on one of them. I will do that later in the week-end - if you require.

            In the meantime, here is the X3 CNC-ed with the kit that is to be fitted to mine. The developer (here in OZ) makes all his own stuff (other than bearings, ball-screws etc - of course) at home on his CNC-ed X3. My kit is the top-of-the line with the 6" "Vertex" rotary table as the 4th. axis.

            Here is the web site:
            http://www.cnckits.com.au

            http://www.cnckits.com.au/product_mx3.php

            http://www.cnckits.com.au/specs_mx3.php

            http://www.cnckits.com.au/photos_mill.php

            http://www.cnckits.com.au/videos_promica.php

            I tried not to post that list as a "bragging rights" post but as a "demo" of what the X3 (and the Super X3) are capable of.

            I hope this helps.

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            • #7
              Might I recommend you save the milling attachment for someone else who wishs to pay shiping/handleing to recive it insted of throwing it out?
              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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              • #8
                Gone

                Too late.

                It was probably air-bourne on its way into the dumpster as you posted.

                It was pretty heavy and I dismantled it into "chewable bites".

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