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  • Vertical Bandsaw autofeed

    Last week when I was cutting some stock on my vertical bandsaw, I was thinking---"Gee---I wish I could just leave this and come back when its finished cutting, like I can my power hacksaw!!!"----This got me thinking---How hard would it be to rig a bandsaw autofeed. Hey--I do this kind of stuff for a living!!! So---Last night as I lay in bed, struggling with my insomnia. this is what I dreamed up. Very simple, but rather elegant. An arm, an adjustable position weight, and a couple of pivot points, I've shown a 1" thick x 3" wide x 6" long plate as the "Pusher" plate. One hardstop would be factored in to keep the pusher plate from cutting itself in half on the saw blade.---Brian


    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 10-24-2009, 10:08 AM.
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Brian, that sure looks to be an elegant solution. Now work out all the details for all of us who have 14" Rockwell/Deltas or their clones, (mine is a Busy Bee Something or Other,) and you will be voted "Mekanikal Injuneer Deziner of the Yeer!" I just spent two hours at the "screamin demon" chopping up old barbeque castings to small chunks to feed a crucible and I SURE could have used an auto feed. Duffy
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Duffy
      Brian, that sure looks to be an elegant solution. Now work out all the details for all of us who have 14" Rockwell/Deltas or their clones, (mine is a Busy Bee Something or Other,) and you will be voted "Mekanikal Injuneer Deziner of the Yeer!" I just spent two hours at the "screamin demon" chopping up old barbeque castings to small chunks to feed a crucible and I SURE could have used an auto feed. Duffy
      Duffy---that design is just like pantyhose--"one size fits all!!!" My bandsaw is an old "Jet" that I bought from a retired carpenter.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #4
        Looks to be even more simplistic then Grob's solution of wire, pully, and weights.

        How ever as the weight nears the bottom of the swing it will have less horizontal force to apply to the work piece. Perhaps a small automotive presurized gas shock simular to the ones they outfit on the hood or trunk lid of newer cars. The pivot point could slide on the arm just as your weight does to adjust the amount of force applied

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JoeFin
          Looks to be even more simplistic then Grob's solution of wire, pully, and weights.

          How ever as the weight nears the bottom of the swing it will have less horizontal force to apply to the work piece. Perhaps a small automotive presurized gas shock simular to the ones they outfit on the hood or trunk lid of newer cars. The pivot point could slide on the arm just as your weight does to adjust the amount of force applied
          Joe--with the limited amount of travel that the pusher bar makes, the horizontal weight arm never gets any farther from horizontal than what you see in the picture, even at a full depth cut.
          Brian Rupnow

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          • #6
            Saw Feed

            Check out the chain and cable system as used on the old DoAll band saws. Your system does not provide a constant pressure on the blade. Hoe do you lift the weight to start a cut?

            JRW

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            • #7
              Brian,
              Am I missing something ? How do you factor in different lengths of cut ? say you have a 6" deep cut to do in a plate and it overhangs the bed in the start position.
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #8
                Originally posted by brian Rupnow
                Joe--with the limited amount of travel that the pusher bar makes, the horizontal weight arm never gets any farther from horizontal than what you see in the picture, even at a full depth cut.
                Yep - I based my assumptions off my experiences with a Grob 36" vertical saw. Not all saws are quite that large.

                Are you going to incorporate a fence in the design ?

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                • #9
                  Guys--I'm probably not even going to build it. It was just an idea that I had. Sometimes a good visual representation of an idea will spur others into the knowledge that "Hey--Thats pretty simple--I could build something like that!!!".
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    Perhaps I'll go ahead and build one of these, just to see how well it works. Yesterday when I was building the "Table travel stops" for my milling machine, I had to sacrifice an old slide hammer I'd made about 35 years ago when I was doing a lot of custom auto body work to get the 1/2" shaft I need. I still have a piece of the 1/2" shaft left, and the slide which is a nice chunk of 2" diameter 1018 mild steel x 6" long---perfect for the "weight" part of the mechanism.
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • #11
                      Redesign time---I didn't like the way things stuck way out past the front of the saw table.--This tucks it in a lot tighter, and the "weight-arm" is on one side of the bandsaw only---still thinking---

                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • #12
                        I built a constant pressure auto feed on my bandsaw a few years ago. I used an air cylinder with 12" stroke to push the saw into the work that is held in a stationary vise. It's kind of a pricey system but has worked flawlessly from day one. By the way the saw is used for one operation only.

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                        • #13
                          Still very limited on the size of material that can be fitted inbetween the blade and the pusher when it's right back.

                          .
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            I built some rails on the side of a bandsaw table and then had a weight driven auxillary table ride on the rails. The table was a piece of 1/2 inch aluminum with 1/4-20 NC holes on a 2 inch grid. You could bolt all kinds of stops and clamps ect all over it. A great way to set up for multiple part runs.

                            I now use a Roll-In with the head moving and the material clamped in a vise or fixtures on the table. The first thing I did when getting the saw was drill and tap a pattern of 3/8-16 NC holes. I use mill hold downs, angle iron or whatever to build fixtures. I even have a fixture for cutting circles so I don't have to fight the cutting torch kerf.

                            I think Bryan's idea would work well on small length cuts ie. bar stock, angle ect. An addition would be a clamping system for cutting round bar.

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                            • #15
                              Our Powermatic 20" bandsaw had a power feed dealy on it. Consists of a 'V' shaped pusher that has notches in each leg of the 'V'. The pusher is connected to a cable arrangement that has a weight attached and a foot pedal to lift the weight. As far as I can determine, its purpose is to push the part into the blade, but not to guide it, you are supposed to do that yourself. I removed it when we got the saw, as it'd be in the way for woodworking and even much metalworking.

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