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  • V-Block vice fixture

    Every once in a (rare) while, I have to stand a round part on end in my mill and do "something" to the end of it.---And up untill today, I didn't have any real good way of holding onto a round part standing on end. I am still waiting for some "real work" to come into my engineering office, so today I decided to make a V-block that would fit into my Tilt-A-Whirl vice. I hate to admit it, but it took me the entire day to make this, and fortunately I had a peice of 2" thick scrap aluminum plate around. I designed the 3 V's to accomodate any diameter rod from 1/8" up to 1 1/4" diameter. I stuck a peice of 5/16" round brass in the fixture, just for "show and tell". The fixture is a "good fit" over the fixed jaw in my vice, and can be lifted off without having to tighten or loosen the bolts holding the rear clamp bars in place.

    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    That looks like the business thanks for showing.I like the way you made several v's.Wow well done could you show how you cut them ?Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #3
      Alistair---I stood the part in my vice at 45 degrees and milled the notches with a 1" diameter end mill. I laid out lines on the piece of aluminum and milled to the lines.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #4
        Great! Thanks Fred

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        • #5
          Wow once again you do great work Brian thanks pal.Alistair
          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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          • #6
            Very nice!

            Personally, I either stand a regular V-block on end, or get out my 5C collet blocks.

            I like the way you keyed the softjaw so it is located relative to the fixed jaw.

            Cheers,

            BW
            ---------------------------------------------------

            http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
            Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
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            • #7
              Nice work, but a few words of caution.. loading the 'side' of your vise like that is bad for it, it puts stress on whatever alignment methods it has if not directly on the screw. allways try and center your work with the screw.

              Second I think its best to have your work located agaist the fixed jaw, and your jig against the movable jaw.

              90 degrees is a good angle for its ability to also hold square peices diagionaly, but other angles can be used as well, ie 60 degrees, holds bigger round peices without having such a deep cut or wraping around smaller peices so much.
              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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              • #8
                Why wouldn't the simple solution (as already suggest by others) of dropping a V-block into your mill vice have sufficed? Was there some advantage to your shop made block that we missed?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe
                  Why wouldn't the simple solution (as already suggest by others) of dropping a V-block into your mill vice have sufficed? Was there some advantage to your shop made block that we missed?
                  There was a tremendous advantage to doing it the way I showed. I didn't have a store bought V block. I have only had about 3 months steady work this year. I had a big chunk of 2" thick aluminum plate setting around doing nothing, and I'm setting around doing nothing------Need I say more???
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    I like it, Brian. Nice and simple. I also wondered about the off center loading and was reminded of a device I saw in a very old book on Google. It is a thick piece of steel, about jaw height and width, flat on one side, slight convex curve on the other, horizontally and vertically. The convex side goes against the moving jaw and pivots as needed. It holds the work and also the other side of the softjaw and evens the forces across the vice.

                    Maybe you should be writing a book in your spare time - if you add up all the pages you've contributed here you have a couple good chapters going!

                    Edit: That vice aid I mentioned reminded me of another thing that looks similar.

                    http://rj3sp.blogspot.com/2009/10/rattleback.html

                    Except it's a toy and has too much taper for the vise, it otherwise looks quite a bit like it.
                    Last edited by dp; 10-28-2009, 11:44 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Good job Brian, but dang you, now there is something else I would like to make, tooooo much good stuff going on here on HSM. Wish I was like you, start a project and just complete it, I seem to have a attention span of a three year old, especially when not getting paid for it.

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                      • #12
                        great job brain, i only got one sudjestion and its a good one, take it to a cnc shop and ask them how much to do a run of say 1000 of them but in hardened steel then start selling them on ebay,and other places, when yu can makes soemthing that nice and functional its worth and investmet for profit, iam sure there would be a market the only thing i would alter would be per haps a flat back so it would fit any vice and make a set ,, call them the ultimate V plates and run a horazontail v as well throught the middel of the plates so then you can go verticial and horozontail.

                        i have vice that has a 1 sided V thats runs both directions and i gota tell ya its hte handiest vice i own and i dont hae to fiddle with my v blocks only thing is they made the V block only on 1 side of the vice but it does work but if it had both sides then it would be more functional for other things so when i need adouble v i put my big vice on and use my v blocks any how

                        Again man great job keep up the good work,

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                        • #13
                          One of the favorite tools I have used over the years is a V block on perhaps a 60 degree angle that was about the same width/ depth as the vise. I think it lacked enough on the width that you could use a little top mounted vise stop with it. It was good for any kind of large diameter, and because of the thickness, you could hold thin work with it (i.e. a 3" diameter plate 1/4" thick).

                          Your v block looks like it should work well for you- I gave up trying to hold round pieces in a vise, or even round pieces in a v block clamped without vise pressure on them (using the little v block clamp)! After you do this long enough you accumulate a few of those blocks that suffered a "whirlybird"!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by reggie_obe
                            Why wouldn't the simple solution (as already suggest by others) of dropping a V-block into your mill vice have sufficed? Was there some advantage to your shop made block that we missed?
                            I have a whole bunch of round parts that need a set of holes on a
                            bolt circle. A "V" block like this will make it possible to repeat the
                            location of the parts so the hole pattern will be identical without
                            re-zeroing the DRO each time. I'm in the process of making one
                            right now. We have at least 4 sizes of V blocks but this still a very
                            worth while addition. I am going to put a clamping screw on one
                            end of it to firmly locate it since the jaws of the Kurt don't extend
                            enough to grab the thickness like the "original". :-)
                            ...lew...

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                            • #15
                              Lew,

                              Use soft vise jaws (aluminum) and bore them to accept the parts. Can't get much better as far as locating and holding securely.

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