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  • #16
    For my home shop, it's drawers and more drawers. Lots of little plastic drawers for stock screws and other new items:


    Those all have labels announcing what's inside.

    End mills go in flat drawers so they can be seen easily:




    Salvage hardware in jars? No way. I tried that for a little while, but soon discovered that the jars were a way to put the stuff away where it would never be found or even remembered. Too many different things to sort out. So, that stuff goes in very shallow wide drawers where it's easy to rummage through:



    Now, in the guitar repair shop where we really have a lot of salvage, the drawers go on for basically ever:
    Last edited by Frank Ford; 10-31-2009, 04:18 PM.
    Cheers,

    Frank Ford
    HomeShopTech

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    • #17
      Not exactly on topic, but I came up with a way store my sheet sandpaper last night. I purchased four new packs and then looked at the unorganized pile from the past 40 years. Yes, I do have some sandpaper I bought that long ago. Anyway, I had been using some of these accordian folders for various temporary filing needs and it hit me that sandpaper is basically the same size as standard paper. Sooooo...



      About 100 sheets of sandpaper, neatly organized by grit size in one folder. It is not full: there's room for at least twice that much. The folder has 13 slots so I was able to store sizes from 50 through 2000. I guess when I get more or feel the need to sort by types of paper, I will just buy another folder or two.

      Bonus feature: sand paper tends to curl up and become difficult to use if stored loose. Ask me how I know. But the folder should keep them all flat.

      Second bounus feature: it will be a LOT easier to see just how much I have of each grit/type. So I won't run out or buy the same type when I don't really need it.
      Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 11-01-2009, 08:25 PM.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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      • #18
        TMT, I have a lot of pvc pipe that I salvaged, wall thickness between 1/16 and 1 1/4 inches. Lots in 1/8 wall thickness. What I have done is cut lengths that will fit side to side in the oven, then jisawed a line across the length. Heat in the oven then flatten between boards. That becomes my raw material.

        So long story short, I used the 1/8 thick stuff and sawed it into squares that fit the downspout tubing, rounding the corners to suit on the sander. While sanding the corners, I also sanded a chamfer on the top four edges of what will become the bottoms.

        Next is to wipe some pvc cement around the bottom inside of each tube, then press that tube down over the bottom. The cement is sort of wedged into place around the bottom, and what cement is left showing is left to dry. I could probably do ten containers in the time it has taken to describe this process.

        I've just taken some pictures. Seems the batteries in the camera now are holding their charge long enough to let me use the camera intermittently without finding it always dead. The pics should be here soon.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #19
          My method of storage

          Everything in its place and everything all over the place.
          Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

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          • #20
            Paul, I don't think I have ever heard of that sandpaper tip before. Makes a person shake their head (me anyways)and ask themselves "Why didn't I think of that!"
            Very neat!
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • #21


              New style of snap in peg board drawers with a shelf style lid.


              Parrot toy parts storage

              small parts behind the bench lathe and mill
              Glen
              Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
              I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
              All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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              • #22


                Here's a look into one drawer, showing the bottom with containers in it, and two sliding trays above.

                Here's one container






                If I got lucky with Photobucket, this should be another view of this drawer with the trays moved a bit.
                Last edited by darryl; 11-01-2009, 10:04 PM.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #23


                  This should be another view of the container.

                  Here's the other drawer I set up the same way. I keep lots of the special purpose milling cutters in here.
                  I know they shouldn't be laying touching each other, but I do take care not to smash them together.

                  Note the blue handles- I'm getting a lot of mileage out of that 800 lb piece of pvc water main that the city
                  didn't think I could pick up out of a ditch. They said if I could get it out of there I could have it. Ha.


                  This picture shows the general idea of how I sanded the tops of the containers. Not shown
                  in this picture is the jig I used to line the containers up and keep them at the right angle for
                  the sanding operation.



                  Of possible interest, but not related to this project, is the blue plastic pulley and that small width belt
                  that drives the sanding drum. I built this thing many years ago and it gets used everyday. I haven't once
                  had to adjust the motor to take up any slack in the belt, and it doesn't slip. I had no idea how long the pvc
                  pulley would last, or if the belt and pulley combination would prove troublesome. It hasn't. Note that my
                  sanding belt is worn out- these are ordinary belt sander belts, but I'd like to replace it with a zirconia one
                  if I could ever find one in this size.
                  Last edited by darryl; 11-01-2009, 10:22 PM.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #24


                    More parrot toy parts storage

                    nuts ,bolts and screws

                    Library card catalog. drawer units from old sewing machine desks,
                    Glen
                    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally Posted by tattoomike68
                      Im going to do it too once I get organized.


                      Where have I heard that before


                      Originally posted by Ken_Shea
                      Where have I heard that before

                      I plan on getting oragnized someware in the years 2011 to 2017 , not sure yet. cant rush things you know.

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                      • #26
                        If you don't get it together by 2012, why bother?
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore
                          About 100 sheets of sandpaper, neatly organized by grit size in one folder. It is not full: there's room for at least twice that much. The folder has 13 slots so I was able to store sizes from 50 through 2000. I guess when I get more or feel the need to sort by types of paper, I will just buy another folder or two.
                          That's awesome...plus you can keep 1/4 sheets and small pieces easily organized so you aren't always cutting up a new sheet!

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