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  • OT Made in USA

    Went to the local Looking Or Wandering Everwhere for Something store last week to gather supplies for a fiberglass project. As I walked to checkout I tallied up and all five items were quality made and made in the US! Try that at Wally World. I pointed it out to the clerk and thanked her for supplying American-made stuff.

    The same day I went into a local bearing supply store to get a bearing for my Makita drill (made in Japan). It had soldiered on for 15 years bulldozing large bits and 3" deck screws till the front bearing wore out. Sure enough it was easily repairable.

    However, when I got the best bearing they had (SKF) it was made in India. I asked for a bearing made in the US and he said they didn't have any and most of the time they were made in Chech, Romania or elsewhere. He got pretty pissy with me until I explained that every bearing made elsewhere was somebody's job lost in America and that next time it might not be their job, it might be his. We got along okay after that.

    My modus operandi is to buy quality and buy American if you can. My guess is that if 300 million Americans started asking for good US-made stuff, there wouldn't be any lost jobs.

    Dave A.
    The quality is remembered long after the price is forgotten

  • #2
    Any idea how many foreign made parts are in your Made in USA products?
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      If the value of the dollar continues to slide we will see more products being made here.

      Vernon

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      • #4
        OT made in USA

        This is not only a USA problem Evan it is a Canada problem too. Buy from your own country first and foremost. Take care of yourselves first. Jobs, Canadian or USA that is the bottom line.

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        • #5
          Complex assemblies

          Evan,
          Your implication is well taken.
          The VIN number on my Tundra indicates it was "made" in the US. On closer evaluation many of the drive train parts, etc, were "made" in Japan.
          The term "made" is losing its significance. More precise would be "assembled" "manufactured" and so on.
          For simple materials, such as vinyl tape, "made" would probably be sufficient.

          Dave A.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by koda2
            Went to the local Looking Or Wandering Everwhere for Something store last week to gather supplies for a fiberglass project. As I walked to checkout I tallied up and all five items were quality made and made in the US! Try that at Wally World. I pointed it out to the clerk and thanked her for supplying American-made stuff.

            The same day I went into a local bearing supply store to get a bearing for my Makita drill (made in Japan). It had soldiered on for 15 years bulldozing large bits and 3" deck screws till the front bearing wore out. Sure enough it was easily repairable.

            However, when I got the best bearing they had (SKF) it was made in India. I asked for a bearing made in the US and he said they didn't have any and most of the time they were made in Chech, Romania or elsewhere. He got pretty pissy with me until I explained that every bearing made elsewhere was somebody's job lost in America and that next time it might not be their job, it might be his. We got along okay after that.

            My modus operandi is to buy quality and buy American if you can. My guess is that if 300 million Americans started asking for good US-made stuff, there wouldn't be any lost jobs.

            Dave A.
            The quality is remembered long after the price is forgotten

            Unfortunately, it's no longer possible to find American-Made goods in U.S. stores anymore, even a small percentage of the time. Nice sentiments and good luck in the future.

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            • #7
              Canada doesn't manufacture most of they goods it uses. It buy the majority from the USA. We are the USA's best customer and the USA buys more from Canada than any other country. If the "Buy American" legislation isn't amended it will have some very serious unforseen consequences for both countries. The politicians don't seem to recognize that and probably think that the US buys most of it's products from China. Bush though that Mexico was the largest trading partner. If Canada is cut off from exporting goods at the previously and still in effect NAFTA rates then Canadian companies will go bankrupt. This will greatly increase the price in the USA of a wide variety of goods which will add serious fuel to the inflationary fire. It will also cause American companies to go bankrupt as Canadian companies stop buying American.

              The biggest problem right now is that the US labour unions have the current politicians in their hip pocket. They would rather set their ass on fire than agree to cross border trade no matter what it may cost in the long term.

              Good Luck.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                I used to think that the "buy American" crowd was old fashioned, but I am starting to feel the same way.

                I still buy a lot of imports -- who doesn't ? -- but I give preference to Made-in-USA when the price is within my budget. Drill bits are a good example.

                I have a few questions for the "buy American" guys ? Should Canadian machinists buy only Canadian tooling ?

                Am I supposed to stop buying German chainsaws?

                Should I sell my Swiss micrometers?

                Should we boycott all products made in the UK ?

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                • #9
                  Boycotting products will result in a trade war. Nobody wins a trade war. British Columbia alone exports 5 million cubic metres of raw logs to the US each year. There is a great deal of pressure here to stop that. It won't take much to push the government to restrict such exports and if we do it will cost perhaps 10,000 jobs in the US for that item alone.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    "My guess is that if 300 million Americans started asking for good US-made stuff, there wouldn't be any lost jobs."

                    As soon as we're ready to pay for American labor and for the costs of business-choking environmental regulations, etc, there will be American-made products.

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                    • #11
                      I always purchase a North American made product first if available. Most Asian products the quality of the material can be poor and the workmanship varies. Importers likely look for the lowest price first with little thought about quality.
                      There are a couple other things I wonder about, one is the shipping costs, mainly fuel as these big freighters that traverse the Pacific ocean measure their fuel consumption in tons per hour.
                      Do they go to Venezuela to fill up where gasoline is 5.9 cents a litre, diesel would be about the same price.
                      The second is why are there no trade quotas and tariffs on some of these imported goods. Canada and the U.S. have a trade agreement that protects both sides. We wont be able to buy their products when we no longer have jobs


                      Terry

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TxBaylea
                        If the value of the dollar continues to slide we will see more products being made here.

                        Vernon
                        Only if you still have the facilities / machinery and the skill set to run it.

                        .
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          why are there no trade quotas and tariffs on some of these imported goods.
                          1. Because we like inexpensive stuff.
                          2. If we put any serious tariffs on China they'll call in our debt and cream our economy. Oops maybe we shouldn't have sold our souls for inexpensive plastic Chinese crap.

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                          • #14
                            Just having returned from an 8700 mile cross country trip, I have a new understanding of Made in America.

                            We went through Waterloo, Iowa, home of John Deere. It's a town that looks worn out. Too many of the homes are vacant, left behind with the 1980s loss of some 13,000 manufacturing and food-processing jobs, a loss from which the city will never recover. In spite of the museum-quality collection of classic middle-American residential and commercial architecture, Waterloo's broken windows, dark apartment buildings and empty factories hint at an America that has more problems than anyone celebrating the flag at Mt. Rushmore would want to think about.

                            Throughout New England we saw the closed mill buildings, some of which have been converted to other uses -- boutique apartments, artists lofts, or just hangouts for transients and graffiti artists. In Greenfield, M.A., once a center for America's industrial strength, the 19th century Greenfield Stamp & Tool building now houses only memories of it's original tenant.

                            But we also toured the Starrett factory (which I reported on elsewhere on this forum) and the Stickley furniture factory in Fayetteville, N.Y. In both places we saw proud workers creating quality products, the cars of 600 employees in the parking lots of each. And we thought about those 600 jobs and the benefits they brought to their holders as well as the chain of other people who are directly or indirectly affected. And it gave me a new respect for the people who make things and the importance of supporting their efforts. When I see that Starrett indicator priced so much higher it's Asian counterpart, I'll remember the quality I saw being put into it, and I'll also see those workers who are earning a good wage, supporting their families and contributing to the American economy, and I won't complain about the price when I write my check.

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                            • #15
                              I'm old enough that anything I buy at Wally World is going to outlast me. The nearest store is so far away as to nullify any enthusiasm I may have to shop there. Never been in one for the purpose of shopping, but I really don't care about the country of origin as a factor in that market segment. It's all junk - Wallmart's junk is just more affordable.

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