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  • Steadyrest Question

    My Jet lathe has a steadyrest with solid bronze (I think) supports. I've seen other steadyrests with bearings instead of solid supports.

    What are the advantages or disadvantages? Obviously the solid ones need constant lubrication.

    Thanks, Dennis

  • #2
    As usual, there are pros & cons to both -- a bearing will pick up shavings under it as it rotates around the piece and can cause irregularities in finish, -- the brass will push these shavings out of the way and eliminate this....
    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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    • #3
      The bearings are less forgiving of chips. They'll try to squeeze between the bearing and the work, and that'll develop a lot of force. That alone is enough to discourage me from using them. I've always been pleased at how well the bronze tips work on my Jet lathe.

      Roger
      Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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      • #4
        If you don't want marks in the work you can use a 1" wide strip of emery cloth with the cloth side next to the work and under the fingers and clamped in the split of the steady rest. Shoot it with oil and snug the fingers and keep the chips out of the steady rest with a piece of cardboard over the work.
        It's only ink and paper

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Carld
          If you don't want marks in the work you can use a 1" wide strip of emery cloth with the cloth side next to the work and under the fingers and clamped in the split of the steady rest. Shoot it with oil and snug the fingers and keep the chips out of the steady rest with a piece of cardboard over the work.
          Slick trick!

          I've always used the bronze tipped steady rests and never had any trouble with them, except once when I got distracted and forgot to keep it lubricated. You only do that once!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Carld
            If you don't want marks in the work you can use a 1" wide strip of emery cloth with the cloth side next to the work and under the fingers and clamped in the split of the steady rest. Shoot it with oil and snug the fingers and keep the chips out of the steady rest with a piece of cardboard over the work.
            Excellent! Thanks!

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            • #7
              Another disadvantage of the roller tipped rest is that if you apply too much pressure, they will roll up a ridge on either side of the rollers as they reduce the diameter of the workpiece.

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              • #8
                My TOS has hardened steel wear pads on the steady.

                Yes I know that's what I first thought when I saw them but if you keep then lubed they work very well and polish the work as opposed to scouring it.



                That's at least 30 years of hard work with rotors up to 1 tonne in weight on them and never been touched up.

                .
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                • #9
                  Steadyrest

                  Back when I was in the shop and using a steadyrest regularly I ran a coolant hose through a hole in the side of the steadyrest and kept a nice stream of coolant (not so much that it splashed, but enough to keep all the pads wet) and never had a bit of problem. Have seen them made with bronze and Cast Iron tips. Liked the cast iron ones the best.

                  The roller type are a real pain to set - to loose and the part moves, too tight and you burnish a nice ring into the part. Hard to find a happy medium...

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