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  • #16
    Originally posted by Your Old Dog
    TMT, if you make the common bowling ball vice mount keep in mind if you want to anchor it for heavy duty projects you can cut a hole about 10% smaller then the ball in your workbench, lay a piece of suede leather over the hole and then drop the ball in. This also works with the rubber tire if the tire is big enough to allow the ball to sink in a little. The leather makes the ball much stickier especially if you use powedered rosen on the leather first. I have an engravers ball vice and used the leather trick when working on long actions as an engraver. It worked pretty well.
    Thanks for the suggestion.

    I would be building a base with the hole in it and then mount the base on the bench.

    I have cut too many holes in the past and have found that they needed to be different (smaller, different location, etc.) to cut one in my many benches. ;<)

    TMT

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    • #17
      I would be tempted to try to mount one of the "pelican vise" heads on top. The mount of the head to it's normal base is really just a round stub that is maybe 2" in diameter. The vise swivels on this and locks to it when the vise is tightened. Frank Ford has a great page on his site showing some of the original pelican vises and some of the current knock off's available today. This one is from Grizzly:

      http://www.grizzly.com/products/Parrot-Vise-/H3302

      The down side to this is that the pelican vises are designed to swivel on thier own and then the movement from the ball might mean that you would have to lock the work with the vise sitting upright and then tilt it. In any case, whatever you may choose for a vise head, you want to keep weight reasonable and the vise head low-profile or the weight of the vise plus the work will make the whole works tippy.

      Paul
      Paul Carpenter
      Mapleton, IL

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gary hart
        Might want to look at engravers vise for some ideas.

        Made from plans in James Meek's book "The Art of Engraving"



        Some accessories made by copying designs shown in catalogs.

        ..and I am interested to see your engraving!
        "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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        • #19
          Gary, nice looking work
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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          • #20
            Thanks for nice comments. This engravers ball was started by a friend and when he became terminally ill he sold it to me. Felt obligated to do a nice job and was much happy how the vice turned out. I have only tried a little bit to engrave and I have seen a chicken scratching do nicer work then I can. So no engraving pictures. gary

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            • #21
              Originally posted by pcarpenter
              I would be tempted to try to mount one of the "pelican vise" heads on top. The mount of the head to it's normal base is really just a round stub that is maybe 2" in diameter. The vise swivels on this and locks to it when the vise is tightened. Frank Ford has a great page on his site showing some of the original pelican vises and some of the current knock off's available today. This one is from Grizzly:

              http://www.grizzly.com/products/Parrot-Vise-/H3302

              The down side to this is that the pelican vises are designed to swivel on thier own and then the movement from the ball might mean that you would have to lock the work with the vise sitting upright and then tilt it. In any case, whatever you may choose for a vise head, you want to keep weight reasonable and the vise head low-profile or the weight of the vise plus the work will make the whole works tippy.

              Paul
              That vise is a Chinese copy of the old Versa-Vise that Brownells used to sell. I wore one of the Versa-Vises out probably six years ago, and got one of the copies, since the manufacturer ceased production. Brownells copied it too, and sell their made in USA copy as the Multi-Vise for $300 retail. I've got one of them, too, and the Chinese copy is almost as good as the original, with the Brownells version a distant third. IOW...save yourselves some grief, the offshore version's better than the American one, in this case at least!
              David Kaiser
              “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
              ― Robert A. Heinlein

              Comment


              • #22
                TMT, you didn't indicate what your uses were. An idea to make it versatile would to a flat say about 5" in diameter on the bowling ball.
                Make an adapter plate and bolt a vise to the adapter plate and then bolt the adapter plate to your bowling ball.
                The bowling ball will rotate and tilt. Thinking might be nice to have the work close to center of ball for a more ridgid set up.
                You could have extra adapter plates. Maybe one drilled and tapped with series of holes for hold downs. Maybe another with pitch for holding work. Maybe another for a different type of vise.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by gary hart
                  TMT, you didn't indicate what your uses were. An idea to make it versatile would to a flat say about 5" in diameter on the bowling ball.
                  Make an adapter plate and bolt a vise to the adapter plate and then bolt the adapter plate to your bowling ball.
                  The bowling ball will rotate and tilt. Thinking might be nice to have the work close to center of ball for a more ridgid set up.
                  that is kind of what i'm thinking of doing. i guess i should pick up a bowling ball and work on it over the winter.

                  andy b.
                  The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by gary hart
                    TMT, you didn't indicate what your uses were. An idea to make it versatile would to a flat say about 5" in diameter on the bowling ball.
                    Make an adapter plate and bolt a vise to the adapter plate and then bolt the adapter plate to your bowling ball.
                    The bowling ball will rotate and tilt. Thinking might be nice to have the work close to center of ball for a more ridgid set up.
                    You could have extra adapter plates. Maybe one drilled and tapped with series of holes for hold downs. Maybe another with pitch for holding work. Maybe another for a different type of vise.
                    Thanks for posting this.

                    I am looking for ideas as to the mount to place on the bowling ball "joint" so it is an universal mount for different vises and fixtures.

                    This is a good idea...has anyone implemented it?

                    The devil is in the details.

                    TMT

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Color me stupid, but what on earth would you use a vice like that for??? As far as a socket is concerned, make a wooden box big enough to have about 2" clearance on the ball on all 4 sides and the bottom and deep enough to come about 5/8 of the way up the ball. Make a thin cardboard partition to divide one side of the box from the other. Coat the ball, the inside of the box, and the cardboard divider with 3 or 4 coats of paste wax to act as a release agent (Don't polish the wax after applying it) . Fill the box to the top with "fiberglass entrained polyester bodyfill" (the long haired type). Let it set for a week.---Tear the sides of the box.---A good tap and a bit of compressed air around the edges will seperate the "socket" into two halves.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #26
                        Well, this thread got me thinking. I have a Versa vise that I broke a couple of years ago, and migged back together. It's workable, but really only suitable for positioning work rather than heavy holding. So to make it more useful for welding and the like, I scrounged up a bowling ball, a piece of 1 1/2 inch stock, and rummaged around in my barn until I came across a couple of sheet metal flanges of unknown origin, and a little wrought iron tripod ring also of unknown origin. Together, they end up making a quick and dirty bowling ball mount for the vise. I left the stalk long, because I'd rather have the reach than the stability. The flanges can be adjusted for tightness. I might modify it some time either with springs on the bolts, or with one bolt replaced by a cam lock - perhaps a bicycle quick release skewer - so it can be locked into position. [IMG][/IMG]

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                        • #27
                          Here is a heavy duty welding and positioning vise.
                          monster ball vise
                          Glen
                          Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                          I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                          All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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                          • #28
                            Thanks PTSideshow.

                            That Monster Ball Vise I REALLY like. Definitely going to have to make something like their floor model for myself one of these days!

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by bruto
                              Together, they end up making a quick and dirty bowling ball mount for the vise. I left the stalk long, because I'd rather have the reach than the stability.
                              How much would the reach be reduced if the vise was mounted next to the ball? If you have something 12" long and want to clamp it upright, just clamp it at an angle and rotate the ball.

                              andy b.
                              The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by andy_b
                                How much would the reach be reduced if the vise was mounted next to the ball? If you have something 12" long and want to clamp it upright, just clamp it at an angle and rotate the ball.

                                andy b.
                                Probably so, but with the plates I used, the ball does not rotate terribly far over. Ideally the hole in the top one would be a bit bigger, so it would sit further down on the ball, but this is a 100 percent "found objects" exercise. So the long stalk, combined with the long jaws, sticks out far enough to hold something vertically with its end on the floor when the vise is mounted sideways, and also gets a bit more height when horizontal. Aside from that, I didn't want to cut the nice piece of round stock I used unless I have to.

                                I'm sure there are better ways of doing all this if one takes time and effort. this was a quick evening time-waster. I have a few more old bowling balls, so I may try a few other things when there's nothing better to do. I like the idea of milling a flat on top of one.

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