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Need Some Inspiration: Machine Tools and the Deep South

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Thanks guys! A lot of good ideas here. I think I should be able to come up with a decent paper on the subject

    Leave a comment:


  • Randolph
    replied
    I haven't seen any mention of the big foundries in Chattanooga, TN.

    Leave a comment:


  • steve45
    replied
    As previously mentioned, the oil & gas industry is big along the Gulf coast. So is fishing. So is farming--and we have other crops besides cotton.

    I find it interesting that someone from Illinois would be studying the South, that's good! I'm originally from Virginia, went to college in Indiana, and live in Texas. I sure had a lot of misconceptions about Texas before I moved here. We aren't hillbillies, we're rednecks--and we don't consider the term derogatory.

    If you have any questions, I'll be glad to help!

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  • john hobdeclipe
    replied
    Fastrack, however you decide to pursue this, when you're finished with the paper, we want to read it.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Almost forgot,Delta airlines got it's start down south originally as a crop dusting outfit.

    http://www.century-of-flight.net/Avi...20Airlines.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    According to this they did build some of the Saturn 5's at Marshall.
    Talked to my Dad today,as he recalls the first stage static examples were built in Michoud and shipped less engines and electronics to Huntsville where they were assembled,stacked upright and static tested.Once the design was approved production began at Michoud after which they were shipped directly to the Cape.That's as he remembers it was a few years ago now.

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  • Evan
    replied
    According to this they did build some of the Saturn 5's at Marshall.


    http://history.msfc.nasa.gov/saturn_apollo/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • ckelloug
    replied
    Huntsville no longer does rocket tests other than research. Some apollo and lots of earlier engines were tested here however. Mission control for some of the earlier missions was in Huntsville before politics shifted it to Texas.

    I worked briefly at Marshall here in Huntsville around 1999 as a contractor on a simulator for a large crane used at KSC. I came to the conclusion that modern day Marshall was about chair safety training and the issuance of coffee maker licenses. Ok, Ok, chair safety training is a Dilbert Cartoon but the coffee maker licenses are real

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Don't forget the marine shipping and oil industries (both on and off shore). I grew up in the New Orleans area and there were many machine shops servicing these industries. Likewise in Texas and other coastal cities. And some great salvage yards with warehouses just completely full of machine tools.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    It wouldn't surprise me if NASA is wrong. They erased the original telemetry and video tapes from the first moon landing too.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    Check the map I posted Darin. It is from NASA and the history of the Saturn 5.
    From Wiki

    The S-IC was built by The Boeing Company at the Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans, where the Space Shuttle External Tanks are now built. Most of its mass of over two thousand metric tonnes at launch was propellant, in this case RP-1 rocket fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer. It was 138 feet (42 m) tall and 33 feet (10 m) in diameter, and provided over 34 MN (7.64 million pounds force) of thrust to get the rocket through the first 61 kilometers of ascent. The S-IC stage had a dry weight of about 288,000 pounds (131,000 kg) and fully fueled at launch had a total weight of 5.0 million pounds (2.3 million kg). The five F-1 engines were arranged in a cross pattern. The center engine was fixed, while the four outer engines could be hydraulically turned ("gimballed") to control the rocket.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The first stage engines were tested at what is now Stennis Space Center,in Mississippi less than 20 miles from my current location.That's all five F-1 engines being tested in the video I linked to and it ain't Huntsville.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3sVuFjJlp4

    The F-1'S assembled and static tested in Huntsville along with some of the J-2 test firings,but not the 1st stage.

    I wasn't around for the Saturn V tests,but I have stood real close and watched two Shuttle main engine tests,it's the next best show to the actual launch.

    The new A3 stand being built at Stennis for the new Aries rocket.

    http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/...n_DSC_8168.jpg

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  • Firefly
    replied
    You could look into NASA Langley, Newport News Shipyard, Trafalgar Iron Works...

    Need I remind my fellow Southerners that the capital was in Richmond...

    And NASCAR was created in Virginia also...

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Check the map I posted Darin. It is from NASA and the history of the Saturn 5.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcruff
    The Saturn V rockets were built and tested in Huntsville at redstone arsenal. along with most of the rockets NASA has used.
    You must be thinking Mercury/Redstone rockets.The Saturn stages were assembled at the Michoud facility and the engines tested at what was then NSTL(National Space Technologies Labratory) in Hancock Co Mississippi which is now John C Stennis space center.They have also done all of the shuttle main engine testing since jump.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter S
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack
    I thought I'd like to work machine tools into mine, but I'm really not familiar with the "south" in terms of industry.
    Well, that should be brief . Was there any machine tool industry in the South? I don't think so, not any the 20th century anyway.

    Leave a comment:

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