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Motorcycle cables fitting the ends ?

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  • Motorcycle cables fitting the ends ?

    Motorcycle cables fitting the ends ?

    I need to make some custom motorcycle cables to fit a different carburettor to my motorbike. I have the cable, but need to make some ends or nipples as they are also called. I can make the ends from steel, aluminium, brass or whatever is best. What is the best way to fit the ends to the cable? Should I use epoxy, solder, weld or some glue ?

    Would someone be so kind and share his techniques?

  • #2
    I haven't done one in a long time, but I used to solder the ends on. Be sure to thoroughly degrease the cable first.

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    • #3
      cable ends

      Make the ends out of brass and soft solder them on. That's the way I always do it. For brake cables you should use silver solder but watch the heat, gently does it or you will fry the cable. Peter
      The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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      • #4
        I've done many cables on British bikes. I had ready-made brass ends but you could also make your own to fit the holes in the levers if you don't have them. I would always counter-sink the holes a bit with a drill and, once the proper length was established, I would open the strands of the cable up with a center punch to keep the cable from pulling out. Once they are soldered that way, they will stay put.

        As mentioned above, you could use a silver solder on a brake cable to hold better although I never did that. You do need to avoid too much heat.

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        • #5
          you can cut the plastic from around an electrical connection block ..inside you find a ready made nipple perfect for the job .

          all the best.markj

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          • #6
            http://www.eurospares.com/graphics/cable8.jpg

            You can make a solder pot out of a 1" length of 1" OD steel tubing. Weld a bottom on it and a piece of random tubing/rod on the side for a handle and then cut up some solder and melt it up. As in the above recommendations from Flanders dip the assembled cable end in some liquid flux and then into the molten solder.

            One filling of solder will last you for dozens of cables.

            Waaaay easier than soldering guns/irons.

            Flanders has kits of cable ends and fittings and will also sell packs of replacements fittings if you use just a few all the time.

            cheers,
            Michael

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            • #7
              I never had any luck with soft solder, i always silver soldered them.

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              • #8
                If your cable is stainless steel as opposed to galvanized, you need a different solder or it won't stick. I found this out once.

                --Doozer
                DZER

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doozer
                  If your cable is stainless steel as opposed to galvanized, you need a different solder or it won't stick.
                  --Doozer
                  Interesting. It might be stainless steel.

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                  • #10
                    On the brake cable (that's the one that saves your life on a daily basis) I think I'd try to find a way to splay the wires of the cable after it passes through the retainer. On my old Bultaco I was sufficiently concerned that I used a reamer to taper the hole, passed the cable through, pushed a nipped off nail back the other way, then soldered it. No way was that going to pull through, and it didn't.

                    Hah - just read an earlier post suggesting the same thing.

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                    • #11
                      For soft solder on stainless steel, you need " Johnson's Flux"


                      You could Silver Solder , but I suggest using Oxy-Acetylene as it will get you
                      up to temp real fast , before the heat drains off to the cable. (1140 Deg F)

                      You could also consider "Stay Brite" a lower temperature silver bearing solder ( Not a Silver Solder , but a lead solder with silver !) (400 deg F)
                      Stay brite is a great solder. Welding suppliers have it in small quanities with about two ounces of liquid flux that works on SS.
                      Costs about 10 bucks.
                      My destruction test for one project showed it to be stronger than 60/40 lead based solder.

                      Rich

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dp
                        On the brake cable (that's the one that saves your life on a daily basis) I think I'd try to find a way to splay the wires of the cable after it passes through the retainer. On my old Bultaco I was sufficiently concerned that I used a reamer to taper the hole, passed the cable through, pushed a nipped off nail back the other way, then soldered it. No way was that going to pull through, and it didn't.

                        Hah - just read an earlier post suggesting the same thing.

                        ............................

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gnm109
                          I've done many cables on British bikes. I had ready-made brass ends but you could also make your own to fit the holes in the levers if you don't have them. I would always counter-sink the holes a bit with a drill and, once the proper length was established, I would open the strands of the cable up with a center punch to keep the cable from pulling out. Once they are soldered that way, they will stay put.

                          As mentioned above, you could use a silver solder on a brake cable to hold better although I never did that. You do need to avoid too much heat.
                          I'll go with the first paragraph. After looking after various racing bikes over many years this was my time honoured way.
                          Because in many cases even if you can get the cables you are dealing with set lengths and adjusters where they decide, not you it's hard to get a neat job as regards layout so I used to make all the cables even if we could buy them.

                          I even used to recable other riders bikes for the same reason. We even used to carry the various rolls of cable in the van to race meetings.

                          Never silver soldered any and I'd be wary because proper bowden cable is heat treated and raising the temp enough to melt silver solder 'may' affect the temper. All factory cables I have seen are all soft soldered.

                          .
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            Motorcycle cable making supplies.

                            http://www.flandersco.com/Additional...SectIndex.html
                            Non, je ne regrette rien.

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                            • #15
                              Damn Triumphs and Nortons

                              Ditto the soft solder, splayed cable and copper head solder iron. Also tinned the cable back some and drilled and tapped the brake /clutch nipple (at the lever end) to accept a small grub screw with the end ground flat. Solder the lot up. Carried spare grub screws and the Allen key to suit for those rare times that you needed a roadside repair and the cigarette lighter just wouldn't do the job correctly which was most times. Paring back the outer and feeding in the inner then torque up the grubscrew did the trick and lasted some time.
                              Ken.

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