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.22 caliber extractor material question

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  • #16
    Beautiful work guys, it takes a dedicated kind person to build something that complicated and extensive.
    Rolland
    "Had I known then what I know now I doubt I would have started the project "

    you didn't quit though !

    Have done some case hardening but have read that the process can be repeated for additional depth, true or not, not sure!

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    • #17
      Looks great. I'm just getting started on building one. I figure 2-3 years as I'm not retired. I'm cheating and bought the carrier block and rifle plates from RG-G. I'm new to machining and figured that would save me time and tooling ($$).

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      • #18
        Originally posted by rolland
        I am going to recut some extractors and try the methods suggested. I "think" I did not get enough heat when I first tried the case hardening compound. I used a oxy/ace torch with a low flame.
        Thanks for the advise I shall muddle on.

        Had I known then what I know now I doubt I would have started the project I is really time consuming. Altho it will make a nice addition to the living room
        For case hardening, with Kasenit, I run the parts at a bright cherry red, with just overhead lighting in the shop, not the swing arm bench lights. I also quench by dropping/plunging the still red parts from about 2" above the oil...keeping them red right up to that point. If you take off the heat and have to move more than that, they start to cool, and may well be too cold to harden. HTH!
        David Kaiser
        “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
        ― Robert A. Heinlein

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        • #19
          Looking at my RG-G plans, I see ground flat stock in the materials list for the extractor. Then I see a note about using key stock included in the kit they sell.

          I could have sworn they called out O1 but I can't find that. Still, ground flat stock to me, means tool steel and O1 is what I bought.

          My build hasn't started yet, I'm putting the finishing touches on my machine room that is going to be my man cave this winter.

          I have the stock and tooling, but I'm having a hard time the time this year to do anything other than work this year. I've worked more OT this year than I have in over a decade. Not complaining given how the Michigan economy is at the moment.

          Clutch
          Last edited by clutch; 11-06-2009, 07:42 PM.

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