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  • Milling Machine table travel stops

    My imported milling machine (Busy Bee CT129) has a provision for setting "stops" on the left/right travel of the table (shown in highlighted circles). I find them very handy, and use them a fair bit. The only problem is that the machine has no provisions made for travel stops on the Y axis of the table, front to rear. In my continuing saga of trying to keep myself occupied until I get some "real work" I have decided to design and build some "adjustable stops" for the Y axis travel of my mill.
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    This mill is a good value for the money it cost, but it had the most mickey mouse table locks for the X axis that I have ever seen. They were a lever type made out of plastic, and were long enough that they hung down and interfered with the Y axis travel. After managing to break both of them off because of their poor design, I built a new lock "handle"out of brass and installed it in the right hand hole, but left the left hand hole empty. Whenever I add to a machine, I like to use a machined surface as my "mounting point" so I decided to use this vacant threaded hole, and add a second tapped hole below it.

    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-04-2009, 02:10 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #3
      As in all things, I decided to model it in 3D cad before I started cutting any metal. The red colored bracket is attached to the face of the Y axis slide, using the two threaded holes previously mentioned. The yellow bracket is a support which gets mounted to the front of the mill base. It supports the grey round rod (1/2" diameter). This round rod runs from the front to the rear of the base, where it is held by a second bracket. The blue "adjustable stops" are threaded 1/4"-20 and the 2" long socket head capscrews which pass though them seat in a slot which is milled in the 1/2" round rod. The rod is pinned in the yellow bracket so that it can not rotate. This serves to keep the blue "adjustable stops" at the correct angle for easy access.The red bracket doesn't actually touch the 1/2" rod----it has a 17/32" clearance hole though it. The model shown here shows the table at its maximum travel towards the operator in the Y axis. Everything clears the handwheel quite well, as I hate pinching my fingers when I am turning a handwheel.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #4
        Here it is shown with the table at "mid travel" in the Y axis. The two "adjustable stops" are shown clamped to the grey round rod in a couple of arbitrary positions that I selected. You can see how the red bracket bolted to the face of the Y axis slide will stop when it contacts the adjustable stops. In this model you are able to see the green colored rear bracket which is mounted to the machine base as well.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #5
          This model shows the table at its maximum travel away from the operator. The brackets supporting the rod and the length of the rod itself are designed so that when the table is at its maximum travel in either direction in the Y axis, there is still 11/16" clearance between the red plate and the brackets. The blue "adjustable stops" are 5/8" wide. I put the slot in the grey rod for two reasons----One as mentioned, to hold the "adjustable stops" at the most convenient angle, and Two--so that any burrs raised by tightening the 1/4" socket head capscrews won't mes up the outer surface of the 1/2" rod.
          Brian Rupnow

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          • #6
            Here is a "close-up" that shows it a little better.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #7
              Nice design brian.
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                Well, on the bright side of your 'forced retirement' -- you keep churning out all these neat designs, gadgets, gizmos, etc for the rest of us
                If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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                • #9
                  Could have done with something like this on that crap Bridgeport the other day, took me ages to find the right length spanner to jam between the table and the column.

                  .
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #10
                    One down--------
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • #11
                      How Bridgeport did it..
                      Rather simple, at bottom of page:
                      http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/page7.html

                      If you did not want to cut a T slot ...2 L shaped pieces, could be screwed to a thin backplate to make fab easier...

                      Think I will make a profiler attachment for mine...
                      Last edited by Bguns; 11-04-2009, 02:59 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Another part made-----the rear support bracket for the 1/2" round rod. I would have had the front bracket made too, except my poor old band-saw blade has gotten so dull that I could chew the bracket out of 3/4" plate faster than the saw will cut it. ----Had to phone the missus and grovel and whine so she will stop and pick up a new blade for me on the way home from work.
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #13
                          These aren't going to be much use if you don't have a CT129 mill from BusyBee, but since I had to make them for myself anyways, I'll post them just in case----



                          Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-04-2009, 08:07 PM.
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by brian Rupnow
                            Here is a "close-up" that shows it a little better.
                            Shouldn't the red bit be a bit heavier it looks like it could bend if you run up hard against it.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bguns
                              How Bridgeport did it..
                              Rather simple, at bottom of page:
                              http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/page7.html

                              If you did not want to cut a T slot ...2 L shaped pieces, could be screwed to a thin backplate to make fab easier...
                              I like it, thanks a lot.

                              Some one gave me two of these stops off a surface grinder that have micro adjustment on them, can't remember who, may have been Peter Neil off this board ?



                              The hex nut clamps the stop and the knurled nut nips the micro sdjustable bit up.




                              Would be easy to make similar items as the chances of finding another set are virtually nil. These are very rigid, when used in conjunction with the DRO they are very repeatable.

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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