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Milling Machine table travel stops

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  • #16
    That red bit is made from 1018 steel. Its not going to bend. Remember, I'm the guy turning the handwheel---the tables not going a hundred miles an hour.
    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-04-2009, 08:08 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #17
      If it's not going to bend at least it will flex and alter any dead setting you have.
      Why not beef it up out of 1/4" or 3/8" plate, not like it's a space critical part.

      .
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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      • #18
        Originally posted by John Stevenson
        If it's not going to bend at least it will flex and alter any dead setting you have.
        Why not beef it up out of 1/4" or 3/8" plate, not like it's a space critical part.

        .
        Because its already made!!!!
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #19
          I have a little part I make hundreds at a time, and I need to mill off 3/16" of a 3/8" square steel piece and stop at a precise location each time. I tried using the stop on the power feed, but it just wouldn't repeat accurately enough, and virtually every clamp and block arrangement I tried would eventually move if I clunked into it enough times.

          So I set on making a pair of X-axis stops that would be really rugged, and I surprised myself with how often I find uses for them.

          Now, THIS stop I can hit really hard without losing a thou:





          This about that:

          http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/To...tablestop.html
          Last edited by Frank Ford; 11-04-2009, 10:17 PM.
          Cheers,

          Frank Ford
          HomeShopTech

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          • #20
            brian-
            "Because its already made!!!!"

            Seriously, scrap it and make one out of 3/8 stock.

            In my travels, I have seen many a man defend a bad decision, and even spend tons of money trying to engineer a work around. Sometimes one has to change gears and proceed with a different plan. Almost always, it is money well spent. Think of the old inefficient plan as a sunk cost, and take only from it the experience of what will not work. Sometimes it is all part of the process. Don't ever be afraid to scrap an old idea for a new and better one.

            --Doozer

            PS- Sweet Frank!
            DZER

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Doozer
              brian-
              "Because its already made!!!!"

              Seriously, scrap it and make one out of 3/8 stock.

              In my travels, I have seen many a man defend a bad decision, and even spend tons of money trying to engineer a work around. Sometimes one has to change gears and proceed with a different plan. Almost always, it is money well spent. Think of the old inefficient plan as a sunk cost, and take only from it the experience of what will not work. Sometimes it is all part of the process. Don't ever be afraid to scrap an old idea for a new and better one.

              --Doozer

              PS- Sweet Frank!



              I have to agree, when I saw the part made I immediately started thinking about how you might weld on some gussets to stiffen it up a bit.
              heck make it out of half inch and mill just the end down if you are worried about loosing travel.
              i
              --
              Tom C
              ... nice weather eh?

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              • #22
                Hi Brian,
                Great idea and I am sure it will save you alot of time. I also have to agree with the others, everything else you have made looks solid. I think you will have trouble with getting repeated results with that plate as it will flex being only 0.125" or 3.175mm.
                Dave.
                Last edited by Davo J; 11-05-2009, 04:12 AM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by brian Rupnow
                  Because its already made!!!!
                  No you have only made the MKI

                  .
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Stops look good, agree with others that the best stop is the biggest and toughest.

                    BTW, looking at pic #1, that milling vise is interesting. It is possibly the tallest, skinniest one I have ever seen.

                    Is it solid despite being slightly shorter than the Sears Tower?
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I am pleased with my "Tilt-a-whirl" milling vice. It holds parts securely, and it does give me the option of tilt and rotate, rather than messing with the angular tram of my mill column, which will tilt but then gives a world of hurt trying to get it trammed perpendicular again. as far as the thickness of the part---I think you fellows are all wrong!!! That being said, if I find it moves, or flexes, I will post that and will post that I have made a thicker one.----Brian
                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • #26
                        Bit by bit progress is being made. My lovely wife stopped and bought me a new bandsaw blade on her way home from work last night, (and then took me out for dinner!!!) . While I was waiting for her to get home I milled the slot in the 1/2" round rod, and this morning I made the front bracket and then assembled things so I could drill and tap the holes in the mill base for the bolts to hold the rear bracket in place. I had to make the front support bracket out of 2 peices, as I didn't have any 3/4" stock big enough, but that won't hurt the functionality. (In the picture, you only see one part of the front bracket----the second part will be basically a spacer. I have to run up to the hardware store now and buy a 17/32" drill and some 1/4" socket head capscrews.-----Brian
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #27
                          Just shows how wrong so many can be, NO ONE on the "Other" site has had the audacity to mention they think the .125" thick plate is too thin. No matter how long one has been in "The game", how many think their baby is the ultimate answer, and resist ANY suggestion that they may have overlooked a basic problem.

                          Rather than make it thicker, you could always weld a stiffening rib to the front face, so that when you hit the back stop, you don't manage to deflect the plate by a few "Thou" and ruin the job.

                          Regards Ian
                          You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                          • #28
                            Circlip--It is not my intent to go to war over the thickness of a plate. As I said in an earlier post, I THINK its okay as it is---And I did say that if I find it is too thin, I will make it thicker and let everyone know I was wrong. I do have 44 years of designing machinery and building professional quality hotrods behind me, ---and yes---I do get it wrong someimes.---But this time I don't think so. ---However---If you want to build one and use a thicker plate, then go ahead.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #29
                              Well boys and girls---its finished. Two days "frigging time" but it works, and it works very well. For all of you who thought my 1/8" mild steel plate was too thin----You were right!!! It worked, but it did deflect enough that I wasn't comfortable with it---so----I made another out of 1/4" plate, and it feels a lot more "solid" when the carriage hits one of the adjustable stops. I have ran the table full travel in both the X and Y axis, and nothing binds, interferes, or pinches my fingers. I think the operation was a success---Now I have to figure out something to do tomorrow-----Brian
                              Brian Rupnow

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                              • #30
                                You know Brian even if the stops didn't work you should be able to put
                                all those fancy drawings into a top selling book. :-) My build projects
                                are nearly always done on loose pages of scrap paper laying around
                                and have many little arithmetic calculations scattered all over them.
                                :-)
                                ...lew...

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