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Pinging Mr. Rupman----Ping-Ping---------

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  • Pinging Mr. Rupman----Ping-Ping---------

    Been thinking, one more time-----about reverse engineering a pecan cracker-sheller. Can buy a 'kinetic' model for about $335, but what the hey?

    Looking for unique ideas powered by a hand crank, small motor, etc, just for the fun of it. Design has to attract the grandkids. Anyone here have an idea or two, been down that road, looked at a homemade cracker somewhere? Share me--------

    Pecan pie with ice cream, in time for the holidays.

    G

  • #2
    Guido---If you were looking for me, Damn it man, get the name right!!!
    What the heck does a Pecan cracker look like.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #3
      Guido,


      Found this on google http://www.bamabots.com/kinetic_kracker.htm
      Mansfield, Ohio

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      • #4
        Post some pics of what you are looking for, the link above only showed one grainy image. Reverse enginering is fun.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Guido
          Been thinking, one more time-----about reverse engineering a pecan cracker-sheller. Can buy a 'kinetic' model for about $335, but what the hey?


          G
          Guido; there is a pretty simple lever one here
          http://texaspecans.com/cart/index.cg...t=Nut+Shellers

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          • #6
            The toughest nut I've ever known is a macadamia nut and it takes a rugged tool to pop them open. Here's an example, easy to reproduce:

            http://www.tjsnutcrackers.com/

            But my fav is an anvil, a two-pound hammer, and a doughnut ring of foam to hold the nut.

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            • #7
              One of "our" magazines had an article a couple of years ago that featured a screw-type nutcracker. I built 3 or 4 of the things, and they work very well. Quick to build also, albeit not the fastest thing to operate. I used a 1-14 thread, brass lathe-turned screw, and a nice big knob on the end of the screw. If I can find mine, I'll post a picture.
              Or maybe someone else has a pic.

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              • #8
                I have one of the lever operated ones around somewhere.
                But it doesn't work as well as another one I have that's rubber band powered.
                This link shows one similar. See the "inertia nutcracker here:
                http://www.4thebestpecans.com/inertia_pecan_cracker.htm

                My version of the inertial model will truly yield perfect pecan halves when used right.
                And, it's fun to use, tho a little messy. But I doubt that you'll find one that doesn't make something of a mess.
                Last edited by lynnl; 11-06-2009, 09:36 PM.
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jdunmyer
                  One of "our" magazines had an article a couple of years ago that featured a screw-type nutcracker. I built 3 or 4 of the things, and they work very well. Quick to build also, albeit not the fastest thing to operate. I used a 1-14 thread, brass lathe-turned screw, and a nice big knob on the end of the screw. If I can find mine, I'll post a picture.
                  Or maybe someone else has a pic.
                  i think i remember that. didn't the guy build a bunch of them for Christmas gifts? i'll have to look through my stack of old issues.

                  andy b.
                  The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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                  • #10
                    He may have made them for gifts, I don't remember.

                    They're quite easy to make, especially as I had a 1-14 tap on hand. I've gotten a fair amount of brass rounds from the scrapyard, so I made the screws from them. IIRC, I turned a plain round portion of the end of the screw and shrunk the knob onto it. Milled some flutes on the periphery of the knob, also on the base of the outfit. Also, I think the original had a blind hole where you placed the nut, I changed that to a through hole.

                    They looked nice and work great.

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