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  • #46
    How about remounting to top slide further back?
    Don't know how much of a job that is as we can't see how it pivots underneath.

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #47
      Well I think someone already mentioned this but have you disassembled the quill to make sure that you have no more travel? There appears to be plenty of length there. A malfunction keeping you from full travel perhaps? Do you have the specs for the machine? What does it say for quill extension?

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      • #48
        Originally posted by John Stevenson
        How about remounting to top slide further back?
        Don't know how much of a job that is as we can't see how it pivots underneath.
        Like this John.



        I don't think that moving the topslide would be an option. I get by fine with the extention. I just have to make sure I start a drill hole with a spotting drill otherwise it wanders a bit with the deflection. Actually it kinda acts like a wiggler when I am fine tuning a center position in my 4 jaw.
        Ernie (VE7ERN)

        May the wind be always at your back

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        • #49
          Originally posted by dockrat

          I don't think that moving the topslide would be an option. I get by fine with the extention. I just have to make sure I start a drill hole with a spotting drill otherwise it wanders a bit with the deflection. Actually it kinda acts like a wiggler when I am fine tuning a center position in my 4 jaw.
          How about a drill chuck holder for your QCTP? You could mark the cross slide with a 'centre' position, or even arrange an indexing peg.

          Tim

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          • #50
            Tim....thats an option worth exploring as long as it could done accurately
            Ernie (VE7ERN)

            May the wind be always at your back

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            • #51
              Or even making a dummy tailstock that bolts to the end of the cross slide if you can wind it back far enough to be useful but stay out of the way when the tool is cutting.
              taper pin drilled and reamed thru the top slide so it always drops onto centre when needed.

              Also allows power feed drilling from a known centre reference, problem with using tool posts is that they may not be square to the lathe axis, rely on top slide position etc

              .
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #52
                Originally posted by John Stevenson
                Or even making a dummy tailstock that bolts to the end of the cross slide if you can wind it back far enough to be useful but stay out of the way when the tool is cutting.
                taper pin drilled and reamed thru the top slide so it always drops onto centre when needed.

                Also allows power feed drilling from a known centre reference, problem with using tool posts is that they may not be square to the lathe axis, rely on top slide position etc

                .
                If you look at my pic 'showing off' the quill travel on my lathe, in the background is the 'power drilling attachment' which is the same sort of idea. That one clamps into a Vee groove on either side of the cross slide, which allows it to be pushed well out of the way when not needed. Even without that facility it could be useful to you if there's enough cross slide travel.
                Indexing on mine is dead simple, there's a small block screwed to the underside, you wind it back on the cross slide until that block sits against a matching block on the saddle. I'll do a pic tomorrow if you wish, if my explanation isn't clear.

                Tim

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                • #53
                  tim pics are always good
                  Ernie (VE7ERN)

                  May the wind be always at your back

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                  • #54
                    It's a "goodie"

                    Originally posted by S_J_H
                    ahhh, I see that the BV25 lathe is also sold as a combo machine. That might explain the wide saddle and cross slide. The extra wide cross slide would surely come in handy for milling.

                    Steve
                    You are dead right Steve.

                    As the OP said, it is the same as my lathe - except that I bought it as a very good "3-in-1" machine. I junked the really good "round column" mill attachment as I have 3 other mills (1 x Sieg X3, 1 x Sieg Super X3 and a HF-45 - all vertical dove-tail column mills). The large flat - and very handy big flat top on the cross-slide is to take a very good tee-slotted de-mountable work table:








                    It is a very good lathe - very solid and accurate -but does not have a power feed nor a quick-change feed/screw-cutting gear-box but that does not concern me at all.

                    I have a few pics and comments to add to this thread as soon as I get the pics edited and up-loaded - hopefully in the next day or so.

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                    • #55
                      Why not do it the right way?

                      Why not just build a new tailstock using the base from the present one?



                      This allows you to up a size in MT taper, if desired, and more quill travel.

                      Then trash that puny headstock and replace it with a spindle with decent thru bore and non-threaded mounting so you can turn in reverse without worrying about the chuck coming loose.

                      TexasTurnado

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                      • #56
                        Or just save the hassle and buy a bigger lathe to get on with making stuff besides tools. Which reminds me, I've got a 1.5" tie rod awaiting my attention. It will need that spindle bore I purchased to easily cut, face and thread both ends...
                        Russ
                        Master Floor Sweeper

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                        • #57
                          Nice - very very nice indeed

                          Originally posted by TexasTurnado
                          Why not just build a new tailstock using the base from the present one?



                          This allows you to up a size in MT taper, if desired, and more quill travel.

                          Then trash that puny headstock and replace it with a spindle with decent thru bore and non-threaded mounting so you can turn in reverse without worrying about the chuck coming loose.

                          That's one helluva nice job TT. How well does it work?

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by oldtiffie
                            That's one helluva nice job TT. How well does it work?
                            No kidding!!! It impressed the hell out of me too.
                            Ernie (VE7ERN)

                            May the wind be always at your back

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by BadDog
                              Or just save the hassle and buy a bigger lathe to get on with making stuff besides tools. Which reminds me, I've got a 1.5" tie rod awaiting my attention. It will need that spindle bore I purchased to easily cut, face and thread both ends...
                              What? And miss all the fun and challenges of precision tool making? Nah, loved every minute of it..... This conversion will even handle your 1.5" tie rod job - bore is 1 5/8.
                              TexasTurnado

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by TexasTurnado
                                What? And miss all the fun and challenges of precision tool making? Nah, loved every minute of it..... This conversion will even handle your 1.5" tie rod job - bore is 1 5/8.
                                Hehe, even though your skill clearly eclipses my own, I do know what you mean. I've enjoyed tool making, rebuilding, AND using since I caught the bug.

                                Very nice indeed...
                                Russ
                                Master Floor Sweeper

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