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Another whatsit? probably aircraft related.

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  • Another whatsit? probably aircraft related.

    just as per the photo, the beveled sleeve retracts, but all that is exposed is a short plain cylindrical plug. No retainers, no features whatever.

    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    Those are Farenheywurst ejector pins widely use in base assemblies of the mainframes of Acme industrial chassis.
    mike
    Bricolage anyone?....one of lifes fun games.

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    • #3
      Those are knuter valves.

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      • #4
        At first glance they allmost look like clecos, the sheet metal binding system..

        http://www.zenithair.com/kit/tools/cleco18.jpg

        You press down on the plyers, the plug extends and shrinks, you retract the plyers, the plug retracts and expands, locking the sheet metal in place (you pre drill a hole through two sheets to be binded togethor)

        But thats just my random guess...
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Black_Moons
          At first glance they allmost look like clecos, the sheet metal binding system..
          Yeah, that was my thought also, some sort of clamp, cleco or otehrwise. But these have nothing that would actually hold anything, no pop-out retainers etc. I'd have guessed some sort of alignment tool, but I have no clue what would have needed the beveled sleeve.

          The splined part at the opposite end from the sleeve looks as if it fits some sort of driver tool.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            Anhydrous nangling pins - for a Rockwell International, Turbo Encabulator.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVZ8Ko-nss4

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            • #7
              Hole burnishers for precision fit fasteners such as Hi-Loks.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Actually, I have found out elsewhere that they are inserters for 'Keenserts".

                The splines engage the "KEES" to screw them into the tapped hole. Then you turn it over and you whack the end to bang down the "KEES" and fix the insert in position.

                Completely non-intuitive, but apparently true

                http://mdmetric.com/prod/insert/keenserts.pdf
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  After looking at the directions, it makes sense. Funny how that works sometimes.
                  Mike

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