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  • Headband type magnifiers?

    As you get older they become more necessary. I have several of the Optivisors head band type magnifiers but need to purchase some more. In the ENCO catalog I see that B & L has one and I have seen several import type in different places. I would appreciate any recommendations you might have.
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  • #2
    Boucher,
    Not available at Enco (don't believe) but I have a set of Miles Gilbert.

    http://www.opticsplanet.net/miles-gi...er-639552.html

    They have three levels of magnification which I find very useful and built in head lights

    EDIT: Not recommending that store, link just for information.

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    • #3
      Anyone here ever try surgical loupes?

      I have a head loupe that works great, just wondering why the docs prefer theirs and whether they'd be better.

      Best,

      BW
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      • #4
        I use the B&L headset http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...MPXNO=12387396

        very comfortable, nicely made, and easy to swap lenses in and out as need be.

        I also have / use these http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PMAKA=505-1931 at times, depending on how seriously I need to see something. mine is in 10x
        Last edited by Walter; 11-13-2009, 08:02 PM.

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        • #5
          I've used the OptiVisors for over 35 years. I like that their glass is damn near scratch proof. Mine are just as good as the day I got them except for the leather headband liner. I use the #3 mostly but also have the #5. I find that the #3 more then anything else acts as a "clarifyer" for me. They also shade my eyes from the overhead lighting and offer a degree of protection. I set mine so that I can peer out from under them without lifting my head. For all the more the OptiVisor cost over other brands I woudn't buy anything else.
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          • #6
            Same here

            Originally posted by Ken_Shea
            Boucher,
            Not available at Enco (don't believe) but I have a set of Miles Gilbert.

            http://www.opticsplanet.net/miles-gi...er-639552.html

            They have three levels of magnification which I find very useful and built in head lights

            EDIT: Not recommending that store, link just for information.
            Ken.

            I have the same unit as per your link - but without the light.

            It is very good indeed, but as the magnification increases the depth of field and width/diameter of field decrease as is expected. As my eyes are quite different to each other (accident) I some-times have to choose which eye to favour unless I wear my normal working/reading glasses and all is fine.

            I also have a small table lamp with a large circular fluorescent lamp surrounding the primary magnifying glass. That magnifier has a smaller stronger magnifying lens incorporated in it. It is not a good optical lens by any means but it works very well both as a magnifier and as a desk lamp.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BobWarfield
              Anyone here ever try surgical loupes?
              I tried quite a few, but couldn't find anything better than a lowly Optivisor. That is for those who wear high strength prescription glasses. And we're not discussing the price difference, of course.

              Naturally, you cannot compare complicated Zeiss optics with those pieces of plastic used by Optivisor, yet I prefer using the latter.
              Last edited by MichaelP; 11-13-2009, 09:10 PM.

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              • #8
                I tried a cheap import and find the Optivisor better. My ENT doc uses one as well, as does the local jeweler. And these guys are wearing them all day long so there must be something to be said for them.

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                • #9
                  I tried the optigrab, but after a while all I'm good for is looking at Evans 3D pictures
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oldtiffie
                    Ken.

                    I have the same unit as per your link - but without the light.

                    It is very good indeed, but as the magnification increases the depth of field and width/diameter of field decrease as is expected. As my eyes are quite different to each other (accident) I some-times have to choose which eye to favour unless I wear my normal working/reading glasses and all is fine.

                    I also have a small table lamp with a large circular fluorescent lamp surrounding the primary magnifying glass. That magnifier has a smaller stronger magnifying lens incorporated in it. It is not a good optical lens by any means but it works very well both as a magnifier and as a desk lamp.
                    Oldtiffe,
                    Yeah, sounds just like me, I use a similar desk lamp/magnifier ALLLLLL the time, very useful indeed.
                    The little lights on the head band unit are almost a gimmick, but not entirely, was thinking about incorporating a couple units like Evan built seriously though, a couple LED there would be a good thing.

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                    • #11
                      These are pretty cool: http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_nkw=dental+loupe

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                      • #12
                        Nothing against the Optivisors: I have two at work and one at home, but there is nothing magic in their lenses. Optically, they are exactly the same as the reading glasses sold online, at most drug stores, and even at Wal-Mart. I have also purchased several different strengths of reading glasses. I find which strength is best for each task and I just leave a pair at that work area. I have prescription bi-focals for distance and reading, but things like the computer screen and the lathe and mill are frequently at in between distances so they are out of focus in both halves of the prescription lenses. The reading glasses work quite well and I can get five or more pair for less than one pair of prescription glasses or two or three Optivisors. The only thing you need for this to work for you is that your two eyes are approximately alike and you don't have any other severe problems like astigmatism.

                        I even have a pair of home made bifocals that I made for use when I’m paying my bills. I cut two pairs of lenses in half and installed the top halves for the computer screen’s distance and the bottom half for reading distance. So I can almost instantly go back and forth between screen and the bill. They were not too high so I can look over the top of the lenses to see the TV.

                        I also have some of the types with large lenses and side shields for use in the shop to help prevent flying chips from finding their way into my eyes.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          In the same vein as Paul's comments the best deal I have found is to buy a cheap visor and refit it with a decent glass lens set. The visor cost ten dollars and a pair of welding cheaters made of real non scratching glass cost five dollars. They fit in place perfectly held with a little CA glue and give a much larger field of view.

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                          • #14
                            I second (or third) the recommendation on glass lenses like the Optivisor has.

                            My use is usually for fine grinding or other uses where abrasive dust is present. Nothing ruins a plastic lens like grits.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dp
                              Yep, search "(dental, surgical) loupe" and there are tons of them.

                              They're very expensive new. That's what I'm wondering about, but we have one individual saying the cheap visors work better so far.

                              Cheers,

                              BW
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                              Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
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