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Machinable Liquid Aluminum?

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  • Machinable Liquid Aluminum?

    A machinist has suggested repairing some waywardly drillled holes in a drill press table by applying liquid aluminum and then surface grinding the table. I had never heard of this approach.

    Does anyone know if this stuff sets up that well to be able to be machined?

    Thanks...
    I'm in it for the parking....

  • #2
    I've used a line of products by DevCon, that could be used to fix divots in a drill press table. Kinda like JB Weld.

    Link: http://www.mcmaster.com/#devcon-meta...poxies/=4i1d70

    As to surface grinding the table, that seems like overkill.


    Rex

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    • #3
      Liquid Aluminum?? I've never heard of it either.... might be interesting.

      Far as the "swiss cheese" table, its hard to imagine anything better than that old standby "J B Weld" in the original formula, the black & white mix, (I havent been too impressed with J B's clear 'epoxy' stuff) the grey mix machines and grinds darn nicely. But surface grinding a DP table? a bit of overkill....
      If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rode2rouen
        I've used a line of products by DevCon, that could be used to fix divots in a drill press table. Kinda like JB Weld.

        Link: http://www.mcmaster.com/#devcon-meta...poxies/=4i1d70

        As to surface grinding the table, that seems like overkill.


        Rex
        I have used this alot, it works good but grinding the table like said would be a case of overkill. File it down and run a rough hand stone over it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bill Pace
          Liquid Aluminum?? I've never heard of it either.... might be interesting.

          Far as the "swiss cheese" table, its hard to imagine anything better than that old standby "J B Weld" in the original formula, the black & white mix, (I havent been too impressed with J B's clear 'epoxy' stuff) the grey mix machines and grinds darn nicely. But surface grinding a DP table? a bit of overkill....
          I'm not sure if he's surface grinding or fly cuttint but it was by request. I restore old drill presses and other machines. This particular table is a large production table on a Delta 17" built in 1946 and the table was pretty much covered with little pits that could be expected with 70 years of use. The table is 3/8" thick so here's plenty of meat there to machine.

          The flat top on the DP base was he same way and I had it machined and it looked like new. I'm also restoring an Atlas 73 drill press from the late 30s and the table and base flat are also getting machined.

          Thank you for the replies....
          I'm in it for the parking....

          Comment


          • #6
            There are several table patching epoxies you can buy -- the Aluminum-filled epoxy from Devon and the Moglice guys make one that's filled with cast iron dust.

            I'm curious how good they look?

            Like the others have said, you don't need to surface grind it. In the normal Devcon directions, they show you several ways to get the surface smooth: skreeting it with a wet spatula while it's still curing...
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              "Liquid aluminum" ends up being pretty shiny.

              I've had decent results saving the saw filings from cast iron and mixing them in a high concentration with JB Weld. Used them just a bit ago to repair some porosity in Hossfeld bender dies.

              I keep a small bottle of cast iron "sawdust" and fill it up whenever I happen to be cutting cast iron on either my horizontal or vertical saw. Also keep a bottle of regular steel saw filings, which are a bit brighter.

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              • #8
                Nar......... let it be, and slap an x-y table on it to cover them.

                I've done not one thing about these on the 7 foot tall DP I bought and fixed several years ago.

                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lazlo
                  There are several table patching epoxies you can buy -- the Aluminum-filled epoxy from Devon and the Moglice guys make one that's filled with cast iron dust.

                  I'm curious how good they look?

                  Like the others have said, you don't need to surface grind it. In the normal Devcon directions, they show you several ways to get the surface smooth: skreeting it with a wet spatula while it's still curing...
                  I'm curious how it will look as well. I'm supposed to get it back today or Monday and perhaps I'll post a pic.
                  I'm in it for the parking....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J Tiers
                    Nar......... let it be, and slap an x-y table on it to cover them.

                    I've done not one thing about these on the 7 foot tall DP I bought and fixed several years ago.

                    That's quite a smile there....lol I agree an X Y is the thing to have. I restore these old Atlas Compound XY's as well....
                    I'm in it for the parking....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I had a 1/4" hole in my old Craftsman Drill Press that was about 1/4" deep. I cleaned it out and used JB weld to fill it. I finished it off with a sanding block and some 240 wet or dry and oil and after it darkened again, you really almost can't see it. JB is pretty good stuff and it's nearly as hard as the cast iron.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J Tiers
                        Nar......... let it be, and slap an x-y table on it to cover them.

                        I've done not one thing about these on the 7 foot tall DP I bought and fixed several years ago.

                        ]

                        It looks like You almost got two tables for the price of one J.T. .

                        I have never understood how anybody can butcher a machine like that, a little ding or ''oops'' maybe but not line drilled!

                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Lab-metal

                          Lab metal (product name) is machinable. 1 part, no mixing...gob it on & let it set up. Can be drilled,milled,tapped & filed....."it even removes those unsightly liver spots"
                          Do a web search---the only drawback is finding it in the small cans.

                          (sorry, I couldn't resist the liver spot thing)

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                          • #14
                            My drill press table has been abused just like JTiers'. So JB Weld will fill these divots then? The JB Weld I've seen lately has iron in it already - a magnet will pick up the tube.

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                            • #15
                              I have always considered drilling of a table accidently is a sign of a poor craftsman.

                              One of the ways you can determine the professionalism of a shop is to inspect the tables of their manual machines like drill presses and BPs.

                              The more the holes, the more likely the quality of their workmanship will be subpar.

                              TMT

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