Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

an interesting tool

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • an interesting tool

    Made by the George Terry Co of buffalo NY.

    The head can be set at any 90 deg position, and maybe at the 45 deg, I am not sure about that.

    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    They look very useful tools,specially that angled head .What will you use it for ?Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a similar right angle close quarters drilling tool, in a Mac (auto tools) branded case. However the drill bits in it are fixed solidly to the 1/4-28 thread. Yours may be its grand daddy.

      Yours also seem to be replaceable with regular bits when they break -- which seems to happy pretty regularly with the smallest sizes.

      McMaster has threaded shank drill bits if you want a few additional sizes.

      Does yours break apart so it can be used as a right angle tool as well? Or is it just for drilling around an obstruction (probably aircraft related)?
      Last edited by PeteM; 11-14-2009, 01:01 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have not taken it apart yet..... I suspect it does right angle only with an offset, but I don't know yet. I am actually a little afraid to take it apart, afraid something will go "sproing" and disappear into the distance as it tumbles down a floor drain etc......

        it actually came with a lot more solid, one-piece threaded drills, but they have a larger thread, which fits aircraft countersinks. This has a much smaller thread.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #5
          Dental instrument?

          Cool drill man

          Tim

          Comment


          • #6
            It looks to be similar to a tool they used to use in the aircraft industry to drill rivet holes and drill out rivets....in tight places.

            I would imagine it would come in quite handy on a restoration job.
            No good deed goes unpunished.

            Comment


            • #7
              Looks like it was originally for the aircraft industry. To drill rivit holes in tight places.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers
                I have not taken it apart yet..... I suspect it does right angle only with an offset, but I don't know yet. I am actually a little afraid to take it apart,
                I'm curious how the offset mechanism works. I have the multi angle attachment for the Bridgeport, and it uses a spiral bevel gear, so you can tilt in in any direction.
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Common for aircraft work, generically referred to as "Terry Angles" (whoodathunkit). Just a simple miter gear setup, no reason to avoid disassembly. Not super durable so use it only for those jobs where nothing else will do.

                  Don't loan it out, it will come back (if it comes back) broken.

                  http://www.terrytools.com/about.html
                  Last edited by dfw5914; 11-14-2009, 05:45 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    its some kind of giant dentist tool/torture impliment, if my interviwer showed me that he could have my PIN number at the drop of a hat, victor frankinstiens neck bolt drill!
                    Where can i get one!
                    mark

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      McMaster-Carr used to sell something like that. We bought one when we broke a 6mm water pump bolt off on a Dodge Caravan engine. Didn't have enough clearance to drill it out with a conventional drill.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        These things might look clever - but has anyone tried using a right angle head electric drill? They are surprisingly useless! It is difficult to apply any force to do the drilling. The place where you would like to apply the force is often inaccessible. I am guessing a piece of timber to use as lever might be a useful option. "Not as useful as you would think. TM"
                        Last edited by Peter S; 11-15-2009, 06:30 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Peter S
                          These things might look clever - but has anyone tried using a right angle head electric drill? They are surprisingly useless! It is difficult to apply any force to do the drilling. The place where you would like to apply the force is often inaccessible. I am guessing a pice of timber to use as lever might be a useful option. "Not as useful as you would think. TM"

                          Yep - a lever helps alot. Sometimes the right angle attachment is the only way.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I took it apart, as I see someone advised was not hard.....

                            Not entirely true, as most of the threads are left hand, and the collar in the picture is RH + LH for tightening.

                            Definitely an aircraft type tool. Not only does it overall scream that in design, particularly the close copy of a countersink tool as far as drill mounting, but there is no way you could decently sterilize it.... And its too big for anything but equine dental work or the like.

                            Came in a lot of stuff that included A/C countersinks and holders, and a bunch of other stuff.

                            What I paid was already low, and I got a Fluke 75, (no biggie), a 150A current probe and one of those clamp-type thread cleanup tools that works on almost any thread. Oh, and another Starrett 1" long-range indicator (ho hum).

                            I figure that after the current probe and the thread cleaner, everything else was free.... I was almost being paid to take it away.

                            I couldn't turn down a cool tool like the "Terry angle", could I? I bet that was first used at Bell Aircraft.. since Terry was in Buffalo. Seems like Bell was up there somewhere, maybe another was as well.

                            Exploded view after cleanup

                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Back to an old question early in the thread -- looks to me like it might be possible to dispense with the right angle portion and use the threaded collar, the last bevel gear, and its retainer to get a simple right angle drive??

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X