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"Need Help With an old Line boring Tool"

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  • Carld
    replied
    Yep, the older line boring and cylinder boring machines are labor intensive and mostly used only for special jobs where the customer is willing to pay the difference or nothing else will get the job done.

    As to the resale value of the line boring machine, it's what every someone is willing to pay. Put it on ebay as a buy it now or as a reserve bid because it may not be worth as much as you think it is.

    It's old school but still used by some. I have an old Kwik Way boring bar that only a small specialty shop would use but it has history with me and I will keep it. As for making money with it, well, I used it once for a customer since the 10-12 years I have had it.

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  • v860rich
    replied
    I don't know if there is any value as a collector item, but I do know it will do a very good job align boring an engine block. The one I'm familure with will work on mains or cam bores.
    Most present day shops would not use this as it's labor intensive to set up.
    The shop that used to do my race engines used this type setup on my blocks when we would add splayed main bearing caps.

    THANX RICH

    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

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  • camdigger
    replied
    Originally posted by flyboyziel56
    Also I noticed in the view of the patent the year was 1943!!. I was off a few years. Wonder if this thing is worth anything restored???
    HMMMM?????
    Line boring has been around a long time.

    A line boring setup might be worth something if you can prove it works and that it's complete.

    There's applications in manufacturing specialty equipment and in repair for line boring equipment. There's more than one thread hereabouts re line boring applications. Not all repair workers torch out and weld in new, some build up worn bores and line bore to true. Another one o' them "horses for courses" deals. Even the weld 'em up dudes resort to line boring to align stuff because the welders have a "by guess and by golly" control over distortion, and swivelling bearing blocks ain't gonna cut the mustard in the application at hand.

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  • flyboyziel56
    replied
    Doug you were right on!!!!! That's it!!!. I just took a look at the patent and it's identical to what I have. Also I noticed in the view of the patent the year was 1943!!. I was off a few years. I don't know how to post pictures on here but I do have an account on photo bucket. I'll try to post some pictures there and let everyone see the machine. I feel very lucky to have such wonderful people on here with a wealth of information that can steer you in the proper direction. I was a little confused on one of the posting earlier about someone telling me to build a piece of metal and weld in in to a hole?????, and not to line bore anything because it would take food away from someone or something like that????. Anyway thanks again doug as for now thw mystry is solved. Wonder if this thing is worth anything restored???
    HMMMM?????

    Leave a comment:


  • Carld
    replied
    flyboy, have you tried calling them? I have got info by calling where the internet was no help or even email. Call them and ask for the oldest engineer or salesman there. Sometimes they have stuff in house they can copy for you.

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  • vmil3
    replied
    Hi flyboyziel56,
    Kwik Way Mfg was very similar to the Ammco boring bar. You can get a look at the U.S.patent for the Ammco boring bar US pat. #2401838
    Here's the link.
    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/2401838.pdf
    I would like to see pic's of what you have if possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    a few tricks to remember......

    Dont let some jackass weld a hole closed with some sort of hard wire/rod then want you to machine it.. (tell them to screw themselves)

    I can go on but here is how to line bore without a machine.,,, lathe out the bushings and make new pins, ,,, blow away the worn out crap with a torch and weld new stuff in. I dont care if you have to torch plate 2"+ thick.

    Not everyone can torch and weld but if done right its like new real fast. some slow ass boring machine even if you can make it do the job to a butthair will be slow and the boss man will send people home and thier kids wont eat.

    some jerk with a welder, torch and a a lathe with roll in and fix a problem in short order. (even make all the holes greasable and better then new)

    My point is stuff like loader and backhoe buckets and many farm machine parts are not worth the cost of some line boring machine, they want parts done today.
    If you have some fancy printing press job for it then yea, use the line boring machine.

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  • v860rich
    replied
    Please post some pics.

    THANX RICH

    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Don Young
    replied
    The automotive line boring machine was used to bore the cast-in-place babbitt main bearings in early engines. I know Ford Model T and Model A engines used that type of main bearings and I think nearly all auto engines were built that way up until the 1930's. It's a valuable piece of equipment for antique auto engine rebuilders.

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  • doctor demo
    replied
    Line boring bars and cylinder boring bars are two different animals.
    Having said that, somebody could probably cobble up a way to use either one for other than it's intended purpose. I would hate to try to use a line boring bar to bore an engine cylinder unless it was a large single cylinder .

    Steve

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  • x39
    replied
    This type of machine is also used to bore and bush pins on heavy equipment in the field, which might explain the smaller range of sizes than one would normally find in an engine cylinder. Could be a nice money maker.

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  • flyboyziel56
    replied
    Yep they sure are!!, Problem being is that is ALL they do is still brake lathes!!!. Maybe a few shapers???. But no luck so far

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  • Carld
    replied
    Isn't Ammco still in business? Have you tried them? I think they still make brake lathes.

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  • flyboyziel56
    replied
    Saltmine I appreciate the response!!. I can't say weather or not it's that particular machine you are speaking about!. I can say it sounds like that kind of machine process though!. There are 2 legs in the box that seem like it would fit a flat surface or bolt down to it, then there are half moon things that look like it slides through the bar about 1/2 a dozen or so. Then there are centering cones, and a lot of extra stuff. Sure wish I had at least a parts break down of this thing. As for boring gas cylinders out, I would have thought the cylinders themself would have been bigger then 1.25 to 3.25???

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  • saltmine
    replied
    Yeah, that sounds like the boring bars that truck mechanics used to line bore diesel engine blocks in the field with. A few machine shops used to have them, too... The only problem is there are almost no machinists left who know how to use them. Most auto parts store machinists are outside their comfort zone with anything more than turning drums and rotors, and automotive machine shops usually farm out their work to professional machine shops these days......

    AMMCO used to manufacture a boring bar that you could use to bore engine cylinders while the engine was still in the car...Unfortunately, it wouldn't do V-8's...you had to pull the engine for that.

    I still remember when I was a little kid. My Dad drove a gasoline tanker for Skelly Oil Company in the Midwest. Unlike today's truck drivers, he was responsible for the truck's care and maintenance. My Dad and my Uncle Butch pulled the cylinder head off of his White cab-over one Saturday and called a guy to come out and re-bore the cylinders of the huge six-cylinder gas engine (well, it was HUGE to me) The guy showed up, and went about measuring the cylinders, then he set the boring machine on the block, and centered it over the bore, clamping it down with several of the truck's head bolts. It took him all day to bore out all six cylinders .020". I think my Dad paid him something like $50 for the job....But him and my Uncle Butch had the White running for Monday morning.....To say the least....I was one facinated kid.

    Leave a comment:

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