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Where to find? T-Sloted Plate For Drill Press Table

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  • Where to find? T-Sloted Plate For Drill Press Table

    I'd like to find or have made a t-slot sub-table to lay on top of one of my drill press producion tables. I don't know were to start to look for this.

    Dimensions I'd need are roughly 12 1/2" x 17". Open to suggestions on orientation and number of slots. I won't be doing really heavy drilling or milling.

    Does anyone here make them?

    I'm looking forward to your suggesions and information.

    Thanks
    I'm in it for the parking....

  • #2
    Several options here. First, is to find a scrapped planer, radial drill, etc., remove the table, and mill the back flat. Second, is to machine your own -- not all that hard if you have a decent mill. Third, is to buy one new - but be prepared for sticker shock. Fourth, would be my recommendation. Buy a piece of flat stock - Blanchard ground if you need it truly flat but lots of other stuff could work including aluminum plate. Then, drill and tap it for threaded holes all over. This can work as easily as T-slots for holding work and fixtures down.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PeteM
      Several options here. First, is to find a scrapped planer, radial drill, etc., remove the table, and mill the back flat. Second, is to machine your own -- not all that hard if you have a decent mill. Third, is to buy one new - but be prepared for sticker shock. Fourth, would be my recommendation. Buy a piece of flat stock - Blanchard ground if you need it truly flat but lots of other stuff could work including aluminum plate. Then, drill and tap it for threaded holes all over. This can work as easily as T-slots for holding work and fixtures down.
      I hadn't thought about a drilled and tapped plate. That may be the easiest and cheapest solution. And aluminum should be fine for what I do as well.

      I could put my tapping head to use.

      Thanks for he idea.

      Ken
      I'm in it for the parking....

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      • #4
        Funny, I was just this morning reading about the very thing mentioned about drilling and tapping holes in a plate to be used on a mill table. Now what magazine was that......... Oh well, it was one of the three machining magazines currently available. Either Home Shop Machinist, or dang can't remember the name of the other one but it wasn't Digital Machinist.

        A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

        Patrick

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        • #5
          You could look for a scrapped press die set. The base would be at least 1" steel.

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          • #6
            Some years back, i fabricated a tee slotted plate for a man, Took a steel plate, milled slots across it, from proportion in machinery handbook, Then took steel bright strip, & drilled &countersunk for countersunk high tensile cap screws, set strips on top ofbottom plate in position to configure the bolt section slots of table &drilled &tapped bottom plate to apropriate position, This gave a servicible light plate.

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            • #7
              Don't forget helicoil inserts for your taped holes for long life. (especialy if you plan to use a softer metal like aluminum tooling plate)
              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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              • #8
                Sounds like a business niche an enterprising machinist could make money in.

                TMT

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                • #9
                  A homeless lathe faceplate looks astoundingly like a round DP table.

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                  • #10
                    I was in a similar situation awhile back. My 20" clausing has a smooth production table. I looked high and low for a T-slot table, all were too expensive for me. So I bought a piece of ground plate and some cold rolled rectangular bar and was gonna drill, tap, counter bore some holes and make one. Still have all the cut bars on the DP table. That was prolly two years ago. Why no T-table? I found a brand new walker electro-magnetic 12x24" chuck for a steal. I put together a power supply using a variable transformer, rectifier and some other parts. Now with a flip of a switch I can lock down my vise thats on the walker chuck. Then to reposition I flip the switch, move the vise then flip the switch to lock the vise. And it locks down solid. Never had it spin the vise yet. JR
                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                    • #11
                      Once you get that made you're very close to having an UPT:
                      http://www.modelenginenews.org/meng/upt/index.html

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                      • #12
                        This is a 3/4" X 6" X 10" steel table with a bunch of tapped holes that I use on my lathe for milling and boring. I was doing a line boring job in this photo. The boring bar is at the upper left and I am checking the hole for fit on the steel column (Unimat vertical column) in it.



                        It took a bit of work to tap all of them, but a lot easier than a bunch of Tee slots. It is not ground or scraped, but I did do a bit of abrasive lapping on my glass flat. It works quite well and may be as flat as most import mills. Of course, there is no reason why you would have to ADD a table to your drill press, you could just drill and tap the original table.

                        I once priced some slotted tables and to say "sticker shock" is really a gross understatement. You could buy a good quality X-Y table to install on the drill press for a lot less. Or just a one axis table if you want to save a bit. I saw some Palmgrem tables advertised today, in a flyer from KBC tools I think. They had both one (X) and two (X-Y) axis models. This would give you the ability to locate holes from coordinates, on a grid. And it would be a LOT cheaper than the slotted stock I priced. A LOT!
                        Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 11-19-2009, 01:33 AM.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          I just learned a new trick - had not used my staircase spacers that way. But I recall projects where wish I'd thought of it!

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                          • #14
                            kcleere,
                            You have a pm.

                            I nabbed a shaper table at the junkyard once. It could be cut up and machined to yield two 3 T slot tables roughly 13"x18"x2" or alternatively one table with 4 slots and one with 2. Slots are on 3 3/8" centers, and could take up to 3/4" studs.

                            Scott

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                            • #15
                              Nemmind the t-slot table, go whole hog and buy an X-Y table. it can be the cheaper import type (the others are insanely out of price range).

                              It will have t-slots, and naturally, the x-y feature comes in extremely handy.

                              There are a few brands of import table which all look alike, approximately 6 x 12 inches top size, three large t-slots. On sale they can be under $80, and, while not the most high quality, they do the job. You might need to do a mod or two to the handles
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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