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  • I did this about 2 years ago. Because the area I live in is so dry and dusty, I decided to add a heavy duty air filter to my lawnmower. The newer mowers were equipped with them, but my older one required a custom adaptor to fit the carburetor airhorn.

    I made this from aluminum billet on a drill press with a 5" milling vise. The 2" tube is epoxied in place. After spending about a week making this, it was pretty obvious that I really needed to buy a mill. Sometimes, ya gotta do what ya gotta do! Considering how crude my setup was, I think it turned out well.

    The airhorn:


    Adaptor, outside:


    Adaptor, inside:

    Comment


    • This shows the adaptor mounted on the lawnmower engine:


      The complete assembly with the filter installed:

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      • When easy jobs are a pain

        Did this this morning. Some Stainless steel rings for a customer.

        Here are the sheet blued out


        They wanted 3/4" exterior, so here are the two lines.


        Lined up in the lathe


        Part 1

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        • Part 2

          Voila inside cut


          The finished discs. They will be welded onto the round sheet metal you see in the picture.


          Rob

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          • Lightening motorcycle crankshaft

            Did this this week in preparation for getting my crank assembly balanced.





            Comment


            • ornamental turnings

              Hello

              this is what i do for fun.

              http://pagesperso-orange.fr/robert.bosco/modeleen.htm

              http://www.machsupport.com/forum/ind...ic,2120.0.html

              Marcel Beaudry

              Comment


              • Here are some aluminum plates we make for one of our customers.



                They are made out of the blank you see pictured above the finished part below. Blanks are 1" x 6" x 8.25" lg. 6061 Aluminum.



                They kinda look like giant snow flakes!

                Best Regards,
                Russ

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Wrustle

                  They kinda look like giant snow flakes!

                  Best Regards,
                  Russ
                  Very pretty, but what are they for?


                  Tim

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Timleech
                    Very pretty, but what are they for?


                    Tim
                    Thanks Tim! One of our customers builds forensic test equipment, and it's a component for one of their machines. We make a lot of different components for them, but this is one of my favorites.

                    Later,
                    Russ

                    Comment


                    • Mostly prototype work and small run parts that end up where I was laid off from. They're getting out of the having "custom made stuff". Here's some of yesterdays and todays "non custom parts".

                      Last edited by ERBenoit; 01-15-2010, 09:24 PM.
                      Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Wrustle
                        Blanks are 1" x 6" x 8.25" lg. 6061 Aluminum.
                        Neat to see the Kaiser name on the material, and even better to see the method for removing a lot of metal without turning it into a Frito.
                        Gene

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                        • thats pritty, looks lika a snowflake!
                          mark

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                          • Originally posted by topct
                            Neat to see the Kaiser name on the material, and even better to see the method for removing a lot of metal without turning it into a Frito.
                            Hi Gene,

                            I do these parts in my Haas VF-0. You can see them pictured below set up in the machine. I run them two at a time.

                            Parts are faced with a 2" face mill to clean the top surface and make it flat.

                            Then the profile is rough and finish milled, using a 500" Variable 3 Flute Carb EM., one cut .375" deep 7500 RPM 75 IPM. Then .750" deep same feed and speed. Then a finish pass full depth removing .01" per side.

                            Next the pockets are roughed all out, using the same tool but running at 5500 RPM and 38 IPM (taking full width cut) One pass .325" deep, then another at .650" deep. allowing .01" on depth and all the walls.

                            Then using a .375" Variable 3 Flute Carb EM running at 7500 RPM and 51 IPM I finish the pockets at full depth .660" deep.

                            Finally a .250" Carb 4 flute 90 degree chamfer mill is used to chamfer the part complete.

                            The whole process to machine the two pieces in one cycle takes 40 minutes.

                            Gives me some time to surf the net, and read interesting threads on the Home Shop Machinist!

                            Best Regards,
                            Russ

                            Here you can see two blanks loaded up ready to go. The .500" Variable 3 Flute Carb EM is in the spindle.

                            Comment


                            • What do I do in the shop??

                              Well today I knocked something off the roundtuit list. I have been meaning to make a die holder like the one on Bob Warfields CNCcookbook for a while now.

                              As luck would have it, I had a chunk of 1.5" hex brass for the main body and some very hard bronze for the arbour.



                              I was going to make a ball end handle for it but found that if I just screw the toolpost up against one of the flats on the hex and turn the chuck by hand it works very well.



                              So while I was at it I nocked off a longer shanked chuck key that will clear the headstock as I pull the chuck around with it.

                              Ernie (VE7ERN)

                              May the wind be always at your back

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                              • Well.. i'm certainly not in the league of most people here.. but I do have fun making chips on my mini-lathe, making custom sized pen mills for a local shop here in town. I also use my mill to make the flats.



                                Again.. nothing special, but its still fun for me. I'm learning alot by reading stuff on this site
                                a few more pics here:
                                http://www.ottawawood.com/lathe/

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