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  • michael3fingers
    replied
    I needed a mounting fixture for my home made rotary table and my old plunger style indexing thing.

    I had an old 15 pound plate laying around,,,,,

    I drilled a 108mm pcd so I could bolt it directly to my lathe, then faced it off so I could spin it around and have a nice flat fit.


    then I made lots of swarfe


    I also put a 1 1/2 8tpi thread in the middle so I could mount it on my Hercus style plunge type indexer.

    I then put it on the indexer and mounted it on my cheap pedistal drill where I drilled and tapped a series of holes.



    TA DAAA

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  • darryl
    replied
    Here's a close-up with my IBM wrench in the background.

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  • darryl
    replied
    A few pics of what I've been up to lately. Not much shop time til today- work keeps getting in the way- anyway, this is a guide which fits between the flat ways on my project lathe. The carriage will eventually be bolted and pinned to this assembly. The mill table assembly will also get one of these, and so will the vertical mill head. In the center of the first pic is the chuck I made to hold the short threaded bits to both face them and to grind the hex on one end. It's adjustable for the length inside, so I was able to simply screw each threaded piece into it and have it stop at the right spot, leaving enough sticking out to face and grind on. This chuck mounts in the 3 jaw, with the setscrew indicating the orientation towards the master key for best repeatability. The short threaded pieces are adjusters, and they fit crosswise, two on each end of the main bar.


    A closer look at where the adjusters go- the main bar has two metal strips that will attach to the sides of it as shown, and these adjusters will be able to spread the ends of those strips away from the bar.



    Next couple pics- self evident, perhaps. One of the flat bars pulled away to show one of the adjusters with the wrench on it.




    That's a 7/32 wrench, by the way. It worked out that by turning off the threads for about an eighth of an inch of length, until the threads just disappeared, I could grind six flats and come to clean corners for the hex and fit that wrench. I polished off what burrs there were (very little) on the drum sander, and rounded over the edges on the faced end of the adjusters. They should bear against the flat strips with a decent area of coverage, and so should be a solid stud with which to arrange the tightness of the assembly between the lathe ways. I'll get a way to adjust the rotation of this assembly very slightly, as well as set the amount of play. I'll be able to adjust the crosslide for a perfect 90 across the ways- same for the mill table and the mill head.

    The two holes visible in the main bar are for socket head bolts which bring up a steel plate from below to keep the assemblies in contact with the ways, while giving enough play so they can slide. All the adjusters are reachable from the top of the lathe, so they will at least be handy to set.



    Something interesting with the toolpost grinder- I used a 3 inch diameter cutoff disc to do the grinding, fully expecting to have to dress the edge of it a few times and measure across the flats and alter my endpoints on the cross feed dial during the operation to produce 12 adjusters. On the contrary, from beginning to end of this process, I lost only about 2 thou off the edge of the disc, so only one minor adjustment required to get all pieces identical acrosss the flats. I used metric bolts to make these pieces from, and they were considerable harder than the grade 5 imperial bolts that they are roughly equivalent to. Perhaps this level of hardness is easier on the cutoff disc than softer steel, which I've found to wear the discs more quickly- or perhaps with the direct support so close to the chuck jaws, the adjusters couldn't vibrate against the disc in a bad way- not sure why it worked out this way.
    Last edited by darryl; 01-17-2010, 02:12 AM.

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  • vpt
    replied
    Great looking work guys!

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  • KillerMike
    replied
    Well.. i'm certainly not in the league of most people here.. but I do have fun making chips on my mini-lathe, making custom sized pen mills for a local shop here in town. I also use my mill to make the flats.



    Again.. nothing special, but its still fun for me. I'm learning alot by reading stuff on this site
    a few more pics here:
    http://www.ottawawood.com/lathe/

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  • dockrat
    replied
    What do I do in the shop??

    Well today I knocked something off the roundtuit list. I have been meaning to make a die holder like the one on Bob Warfields CNCcookbook for a while now.

    As luck would have it, I had a chunk of 1.5" hex brass for the main body and some very hard bronze for the arbour.



    I was going to make a ball end handle for it but found that if I just screw the toolpost up against one of the flats on the hex and turn the chuck by hand it works very well.



    So while I was at it I nocked off a longer shanked chuck key that will clear the headstock as I pull the chuck around with it.

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  • Wrustle
    replied
    Originally posted by topct
    Neat to see the Kaiser name on the material, and even better to see the method for removing a lot of metal without turning it into a Frito.
    Hi Gene,

    I do these parts in my Haas VF-0. You can see them pictured below set up in the machine. I run them two at a time.

    Parts are faced with a 2" face mill to clean the top surface and make it flat.

    Then the profile is rough and finish milled, using a 500" Variable 3 Flute Carb EM., one cut .375" deep 7500 RPM 75 IPM. Then .750" deep same feed and speed. Then a finish pass full depth removing .01" per side.

    Next the pockets are roughed all out, using the same tool but running at 5500 RPM and 38 IPM (taking full width cut) One pass .325" deep, then another at .650" deep. allowing .01" on depth and all the walls.

    Then using a .375" Variable 3 Flute Carb EM running at 7500 RPM and 51 IPM I finish the pockets at full depth .660" deep.

    Finally a .250" Carb 4 flute 90 degree chamfer mill is used to chamfer the part complete.

    The whole process to machine the two pieces in one cycle takes 40 minutes.

    Gives me some time to surf the net, and read interesting threads on the Home Shop Machinist!

    Best Regards,
    Russ

    Here you can see two blanks loaded up ready to go. The .500" Variable 3 Flute Carb EM is in the spindle.

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  • boslab
    replied
    thats pritty, looks lika a snowflake!
    mark

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  • topct
    replied
    Originally posted by Wrustle
    Blanks are 1" x 6" x 8.25" lg. 6061 Aluminum.
    Neat to see the Kaiser name on the material, and even better to see the method for removing a lot of metal without turning it into a Frito.

    Leave a comment:


  • ERBenoit
    replied
    Mostly prototype work and small run parts that end up where I was laid off from. They're getting out of the having "custom made stuff". Here's some of yesterdays and todays "non custom parts".

    Last edited by ERBenoit; 01-15-2010, 08:24 PM.

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  • Wrustle
    replied
    Originally posted by Timleech
    Very pretty, but what are they for?


    Tim
    Thanks Tim! One of our customers builds forensic test equipment, and it's a component for one of their machines. We make a lot of different components for them, but this is one of my favorites.

    Later,
    Russ

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  • Timleech
    replied
    Originally posted by Wrustle

    They kinda look like giant snow flakes!

    Best Regards,
    Russ
    Very pretty, but what are they for?


    Tim

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  • Wrustle
    replied
    Here are some aluminum plates we make for one of our customers.



    They are made out of the blank you see pictured above the finished part below. Blanks are 1" x 6" x 8.25" lg. 6061 Aluminum.



    They kinda look like giant snow flakes!

    Best Regards,
    Russ

    Leave a comment:


  • Marcel Beaudry
    replied
    ornamental turnings

    Hello

    this is what i do for fun.

    http://pagesperso-orange.fr/robert.bosco/modeleen.htm

    http://www.machsupport.com/forum/ind...ic,2120.0.html

    Marcel Beaudry

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  • chrisfournier
    replied
    Lightening motorcycle crankshaft

    Did this this week in preparation for getting my crank assembly balanced.





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