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Did ya ever wonder----

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  • Did ya ever wonder----

    What a fork truck looked like with its dress off??? I picked up a contract on Tuesday---Went down to London and picked up a fork truck, brought it home in pieces, and reverse engineered it this week.--Which is to say, I disassembled it all, measured all the pieces, and created "To Scale" 3D solid models of it. What you see here is 3 eight hour days and one "travel day". On Monday, I will begin to design a "New Improved" version, re-using some of the existing drive parts, with a completely new chassis. I love this stuff!!! After spending most of the past year reading fiction novels and creating "Make work" projects, damn, its nice to be doing some real work!!!

    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    I'd love to have a small fork lift.Due to space,to take heavy things off of delivery trucks,I got a 1500# lifting table similar to the one you've shown,except that mine has small wheels,and isn't going to roll with a load on it. I can get a heavy item off a 55" high truck,though,and get it down to near ground level,though. From there,I can get it into the shop with what we call Johnson bars,wheeled dollies with long wooden handles and a stout shovel nose. They will lift 5000#. I keep a pair of them.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by brian Rupnow
      What a fork truck looked like with its dress off??? I picked up a contract on Tuesday--


      damn, its nice to be doing some real work!!!
      Congrats Brian,
      It's been so long since I had a really "good" business day that I almost forgot what one is, but, not entirely, so I know that this make one very happy.

      Nice job, no....very nice job on the modeling, all that engine modeling kept you sharp though.

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      • #4
        So here we are at 72 hours and counting---Another 8 hours and all the detail drawings will be done and sent to the fabricator to start building.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #5
          Hmm, I like that as I always wondered what kept that type from tipping over with a load on the forks. I see you have added ballast, I guess it's ballast.
          It's only ink and paper

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Carld
            Hmm, I like that as I always wondered what kept that type from tipping over with a load on the forks. I see you have added ballast, I guess it's ballast.
            Carl--Yes, the red you see is 2000 pounds of steel plate to act as a counterweight. The yellow rectangle in the center is the battery pack. Between the battery pack and the front of the chassis is basically dead space. By making the chassis as long as possible, the weight of the counterweight can be reduced.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Carld
              Hmm, I like that as I always wondered what kept that type from tipping over with a load on the forks. I see you have added ballast, I guess it's ballast.
              And Batteries and lots of them. dual purpose.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by brian Rupnow
                So here we are at 72 hours and counting---Another 8 hours and all the detail drawings will be done and sent to the fabricator to start building.
                Brian, how much mor capacity did You add and how much manuverability did You loose?
                I have an old electric lift ,but it is called a stacker and it has front wheels pallet width apart that stick out farther than the forks. Kinda klunky, but I only paid $75 and that included delivery.

                Steve

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                • #9
                  Doctor Demo---Those are difficult questions. In terms of capacity, a 2.5" bore cylinder with a 3000 psi. pump is capable of 14,700 pounds of thrust. On a single stage mast, there is a 1:2 mechanical disadvantage, so the lifting capacity will be cut in half to 7,350 pounds of theoretical lift. (Since there is an inverse ratio between lift capability and stroke, a 24" stroke cylinder will lift a single stage mast and forks 48".) On a 2 stage mast, there is a 1:4 mechanical disadvantage, so that same cylinder will lift only 14700 divided by 4 =3675 pounds, however the forks will lift 96" with the 24" stroke cylinder. Yes, manouverability is cut down when the truck body gets longer, but you need much less counterweight to counterbalance the load. As the lever arm (distance between the pivot of the front wheels and center of the counterweight" gets longer, the counterweight can become lighter to have the same net effect. Most of the design parameters are outlined by the end customer, in terms of how much weight must be lifted, how high, and how long a truck body the customer can live with. The reality of this situation is that I designed an entire new mast and chassis, and only used the drive package and steering from the unit that I reverse engineered.
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    Brian, Thanks for the reply . It was not My intention to get You to reveal confidential information, I was just curious about the lift's new and improved lifting cap. I might have to consider doing something along those lines so I can get rid of the front wheels on Mine. I can't put anything on a rack or machine table unless the floor is clear at palet width. I have to put stuff on the mill from the end of the table 'cause the base of the mill gets in the way, same with the lathe.

                    Steve

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                    • #11
                      So if you have a load raised high, is forward/backward velocity limited?

                      Also, if they turn the steer wheels to an angle far from straight forward, is there restrictions on velocity?

                      Clutch

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by clutch
                        So if you have a load raised high, is forward/backward velocity limited?

                        Also, if they turn the steer wheels to an angle far from straight forward, is there restrictions on velocity?

                        Clutch
                        No-------------------
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #13
                          I keep thinking that if I tried hard enough, I could tip it.

                          Someone else might not have to really try. We no longer depend on functioning brains in a manufacturing setting.

                          I've always liked the sign, "This machine has no brain, use your own". I think posting that would make a tort lawyer salvate.

                          I'm not trying to bust your chops on this, but few realize just how dangerous a lift can be. Generally low paid people operate them with management pushing them to do more in less time.

                          Clutch

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                          • #14
                            Brian,

                            I gotta ask seeing as there is that amount of free space, is there a good reason to not add one more battery? I know these things are pretty decent for what they run on, but that added capacity would, I (god forgive me) assume, be very nice to have. Or is that out of your scope of practice so to speak?

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                            • #15
                              Clutch--I've been designing machines for 44 years. Most, or perhaps all of them would quite willingly and impartially kill or maim people who operated them in a careless manner. Perhaps Ned Lud had it right!! I'm sure you have heard about the Darwin award. I used to set on "Safety Review" boards which dealt with how safe machines had to be in order to pass "Health and Safety" standards, so that they could be placed in the same work space as human beings. After one memorable occasion when a "plant safety officer" demanded that all machines must have guards on the underside, in case someone were to lay on their back on the plant floor and reach their hand up into the machine while another person was operating it, I opted out.
                              Brian Rupnow

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