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  • OT - LHC Operational

    After all the talk about the LHC lately, I just thought I'd point out that a beam was succesfully circulated all the way around on 11/20/09 at roughly 12:15 central time. By about 5:30 pm central time, the second beam was rotating the opposite direction and in RF lock. (I think I've converted my times correctly ... )

    Expect 450 GeV beams to begin colliding by the end of this week. This will allow us to work out any bugs and calibrate the detectors. Later, the beams will be ramped up in energy, possibly as high as 5 GeV each before shutting down for scheduled maintenence.

    Here are some displays of beam splash events in ATLAS:

    http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/publi...AY/events.html

    <edit> I hear there were some folks from the BBC in the ATLAS control room this evening for beam number 2. I expect they will have the story soon.
    Last edited by Fasttrack; 11-21-2009, 02:59 AM.

  • #2
    Group hug!

    Comment


    • #3
      Lhc

      What goes around comes around.

      I had to go to Wikipedia to find out (be reminded?) what "LHC" was/means:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LHC

      Comment


      • #4
        My lights just went dim. You guys ramping that thing up?
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

        Comment


        • #5
          It will be interesting to see what turns up. The usual pattern in this sort of research is that something will be found that doesn't fit well or at all.

          I remember well the time I spent with my father at the Berkeley National Lab. I would wander down to the scanning lab where students made a small amount of money laboriously examining tens of thousands of images of particle collisions taken using the liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and film cameras. They were looking for particles that didn't spiral the right direction in the magnetic field and/or had the wrong energy level for the track they made.

          A bubble chamber works by using liquid hydrogen under pressure that has been "heated" to a critical state where the very slightest additional energy input causes it to turn to a gas for a few microseconds. When a particle interacts with the hydrogen it leaves a path of bubbles behind it and that was captured with high speed cameras.

          The energy level of the particles was determined by the density of the bubble trail. When anything at all out of the ordinary was seen then you had to count the number of bubbles using a projection microscope. It was mind numbing work.

          It was at that time that an entire zoo full of particles were turning up. The Bevatron had been recently completed which was then the most powerful accelerator extant. One billion electron volts of energy with a very high beam density. I once saw them dump the beam through a window straight out the door into the hill side. In broad daylight it made what looked like a science fiction depiction of a death ray, which it most certainly was. It ionized the free air like a brilliant purple flash bulb leaving an after image of a 20 or 30 foot long bar of energy.

          This is how the Bevatron looked. All that concrete is shielding to absorb the synchrotron radiation that occurs when you accelerate particles around a curved track.

          Last edited by Evan; 11-21-2009, 08:36 AM.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Evan
            I once saw them dump the beam through a window straight out the door into the hill side. In broad daylight it made what looked like a science fiction depiction of a death ray, which it most certainly was. It ionized the free air like a brilliant purple flash bulb leaving an after image of a 20 or 30 foot long bar of energy.
            In the early days at the laser cutting company they had no way of measuring the power of the laser beam, they knew how to tune it and focus it but if it wasn't cutting correctly they had no way of knowing if it was the beam itself or the downstream optics.

            This was very early days and the main guy wasn't an engineer but a full blown scientist. His method was to fire the beam at the cinderblock wall of the building and count down to see how long it took for the cinderblock to melt and run down the wall !!

            After a few of these 'experiments' the hole got to be about 4" deep and I pointed out there was a public car park on the other side, so immediately a new wall of 5 blocks stacked one on top of each other was put up with the top block sacrificial .

            That 'power meter' lasted ages until a new larger machine forced a factory move.
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



            Comment


            • #7
              I thought the earth was to implode when that was turned on. Aw crap, I guess I lost my bet.

              While I have only a general idea of the machine and what science will come from it, it is exciting to see its creation. Will it allow us to have a "Mr. Fusion" and generate electricity in our basements soon?

              rock~
              Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Evan
                One billion electron volts of energy with a very high beam density. I once saw them dump the beam through a window straight out the door into the hill side. In broad daylight it made what looked like a science fiction depiction of a death ray, which it most certainly was. It ionized the free air like a brilliant purple flash bulb leaving an after image of a 20 or 30 foot long bar of energy.

                Sure, you have photos of bears and tractor carts and log splitters, but no photo of the death ray. What good is that????

                About the best I saw was out at Penn State when they would fire off the laser that bounced off the moon. It was a greenish beam that went straight up and wasn't very kind to inquisitive moths.

                andy b.
                The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Evan
                  It will be interesting to see what turns up. The usual pattern in this sort of research is that something will be found that doesn't fit well or at all.

                  I remember well the time I spent with my father at the Berkeley National Lab. I would wander down to the scanning lab where students made a small amount of money laboriously examining tens of thousands of images of particle collisions taken using the liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and film cameras. They were looking for particles that didn't spiral the right direction in the magnetic field and/or had the wrong energy level for the track they made.

                  A bubble chamber works by using liquid hydrogen under pressure that has been "heated" to a critical state where the very slightest additional energy input causes it to turn to a gas for a few microseconds. When a particle interacts with the hydrogen it leaves a path of bubbles behind it and that was captured with high speed cameras.

                  The energy level of the particles was determined by the density of the bubble trail. When anything at all out of the ordinary was seen then you had to count the number of bubbles using a projection microscope. It was mind numbing work.

                  It was at that time that an entire zoo full of particles were turning up. The Bevatron had been recently completed which was then the most powerful accelerator extant. One billion electron volts of energy with a very high beam density. I once saw them dump the beam through a window straight out the door into the hill side. In broad daylight it made what looked like a science fiction depiction of a death ray, which it most certainly was. It ionized the free air like a brilliant purple flash bulb leaving an after image of a 20 or 30 foot long bar of energy.

                  This is how the Bevatron looked. All that concrete is shielding to absorb the synchrotron radiation that occurs when you accelerate particles around a curved track.
                  Isn't it funny,the smaller the object being studied the larger the machine needed to study it
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sure, you have photos of bears and tractor carts and log splitters, but no photo of the death ray. What good is that????
                    Well, I did get a new laser recently. This isn't photoshopped.

                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The old bubble chambers were something else, alright! Here is a picture I snapped of the 15 foot primary chamber that was used at Fermilab for many years.

                      Typically, these had a great big piston in the bottom that would compress the gas (usually hydrogen - in this case hydrogen and neon) as the beam arrived, causing it to become super-heated. It would make loud "booming" noises as the piston operated, shaking the ground. The magnetic field was 3 tesla, so you had to be careful about taking metal anywhere near the bubble chamber while it was operational. There was, of course, a serious fire hazard with all the hydrogen. All the electronics were continously flushed with dry nitrogen to prevent sparking - this was a very serious concern since the muon detectors were kept at about 2000 volts.


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