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  • Need datasheet

    Does anyone have a datasheet or can provide specifications for a really old J-K flip flop? While cleaning and sorting, I found 16 of them in my parts drawer. They are Motorola HEP583 J-K flip flops in the round metal package with 8 leads comming out of the bottom. Searching this site didn't help and the only thing I found on the web were places that sell them but had no specifications for them. All the datasheet suppliers I found on the web had no info on them, and none could provide a substitute. If I only had 1 or 2, I would toss them and buy new, but with 16 of them, I'd like to use them if possible, maybe for extending the range of a 555 timer or part of a stepper motor drive circuit. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
    Ernie

  • #2
    I think there must be an error in that part no. Doesn't come up as
    a J-K flip flop.
    ...lew...

    Comment


    • #3
      I cannot find that number in my old Motorola data books or cross references. Does that device have the actual schematic printed on the top of the can? If so then the pinout is indicated by the positions of the leads on the schematic.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
        I think there must be an error in that part no. Doesn't come up as
        a J-K flip flop.
        ...lew...
        I guess if yas have to ask......ya realy don't need to know.
        But I am curious, What are Ernie and You talking about?

        Electronicly uneducated Steve

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        • #5
          Hi Ernie:

          It's not much but I found this at datasheetarchive.com

          HEP583
          Single J-K Flip-Flop
          Motorola
          t(PLH) Maximum (S)=80n
          Vsup Nom.(V) Supply Voltage=4.0
          Status=Discontinued
          Package=TO-99
          Pins=N/A
          Military=N
          Technology=RTL

          I'm guessing you want a pinout, I'll check with the ubergeeks at work on Tuesday.

          Mike
          Mike

          My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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          • #6
            The top of the can has the capital letter M, just below that the part number HEP583, and just below that the number 6917. They all have the same info except that last 4 digit number is different on some of the others. None of them have a drawing on top. I remember my brother and I playing with them. They are HEP583, and they are flip flops. I thought they were J-K flip flops but I may be wrong, it's been about 40 years ago. While it would be nice to be able to use them, it wouldn't cost all that much to just buy modern dual in-line ones and be done with it. I was hoping someone might have some info on them. Thanks.
            Ernie
            Mike
            You replied while I was writing. Yes, a pinout would be what I need.
            Ernie

            Thankfull in LA.
            Last edited by Ernie; 11-22-2009, 01:50 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              So the capital M is probably the Motorola logo.

              The 6917 sounds like a date code. Manufactured 17th week of 1969, or maybe 1869.

              It's only worth your time to use them if you think it's cool. I'd probably try to sell them to the guys who still have stock! Somewhere, somebody needs them for spares.
              Mike

              My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

              Comment


              • #8
                The aren't worth using. And, yes, they were made in 1969. That is one of the very few standards that has survived unchanged. The date code is YYWW on chips. RTL is SLOW, has very low fanout and sucks power.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                Comment


                • #9
                  Evan
                  Thanks for your input. I think I'll wait and see if Mike comes up with any info on Tue. If not, I'll just toss them and use the newer stuff.

                  doctor demo
                  A flip flop is an IC chip used in logic or control circuits. It basically has 5 inputs and 2 outputs. The 2 outputs are "Q" and NOT "Q" and are normally opposits. If Q=1, then NOT Q=0. The main input is the C or Clock input which causes the output to toggle back and forth. The J and K inputs decide whether or not the output will toggle or stay latched. The Set input will force Q to 1, and the Reset will force Q to 0, regardless of the status of J and K. I was going to use them to drive the switching transistors in a stepper motor circuit.
                  Ernie

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ernie
                    doctor demo
                    A flip flop is an IC chip used in logic or control circuits. It basically has 5 inputs and 2 outputs. The 2 outputs are "Q" and NOT "Q" and are normally opposits. If Q=1, then NOT Q=0. The main input is the C or Clock input which causes the output to toggle back and forth. The J and K inputs decide whether or not the output will toggle or stay latched. The Set input will force Q to 1, and the Reset will force Q to 0, regardless of the status of J and K. I was going to use them to drive the switching transistors in a stepper motor circuit.
                    Ernie
                    Thanks Ernie, at least I know what You are talking about even if I don't understand the '' How''.
                    I shoulda stayed in school instead of getting that realy cool job for $1.85 an hour in front of a turret lathe

                    Steve

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I dropped out of UCB for a job fixing high end consumer electronics. It was very hard to resist $4.50 per hour in 1968.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have a pinout of the 8 lead can for a j-k flip flop. It shows pin 8 as the case, also calling that Vcc at 3.6v nominal. Pin 4 is ground, and the other pins not identified. That is an ECG number 9974 but is not shown as a replacement for the hep583 which I don't find listed. It is an 8 pin can, single j-k flip flop, so it might be a pin for pin- who knows. That's all I can find.

                        Hmm. Look it up as a ul923 and find the metal can package- I think they call it a to-5.
                        Last edited by darryl; 11-22-2009, 06:36 PM.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          In 1968, I was in Chicago, working my way through electronics engineering school as a TV repairman making house calls for $2.00 an hour. This was part time work and all of it was vacuum tubes.
                          Ernie

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                          • #14
                            Hi Ernie:

                            No luck on the datasheet. Seems nobody thought it was worth keeping. Maybe there's a message there.

                            Ken suggested you could figure it out with a meter to determine inputs and outputs, then trial and error to determine function.
                            Not sure if you'd already thought of that.

                            Mike
                            Mike

                            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for trying, Mike. I did consider trying to figure out the pinout using a meter but wasn't sure it was worth it. However, darryl's search came up with a similar flip flop, UL923. I searched for info on that one and found an article about somone who made a code practice oscillator with one, complete with a schematic. I was able to get the pinout for the UL923. I think with that, I can find out if the HEP583 is the same or close. I put so much time into this that I feel compelled to see it through. With some switching transistors, I can make a simple driver circuit to check out some stepper motors I've been collecting. They are small ones out of printers etc.

                              Anyway, thanks to all who tried to help.

                              Ernie

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