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  • OT - 1 in 3 laptops die in first three years

    Thought you find this interesting.

    TMT

    http://tech.yahoo.com/blogs/null/154921

    1 in 3 laptops die in first three years
    Wed Nov 18, 2009 1:31PM EST

    So your new laptop computer died in inside of a year. "I'll never buy a computer from [insert manufacturer name here] again!" I've heard the protests time and time again.

    Yeah, maybe you got a lemon, but no matter which brand you bought, you truly are not alone in this situation: An analysis of 30,000 new laptops from SquareTrade, which provides aftermarket warranty coverage for electronics products, has found that in the first three years of ownership, nearly a third of laptops (31 percent) will fail.

    That's actually better than I would have expected based on my experience and observations on how people treat their equipment.

    SquareTrade has more detailed information (the full PDF of the company's study is available here) on the research on its website. But here are some highlights about how, why, and which laptops fail:

    > 20.4 percent of failures are due to hardware malfunctions. 10.6 percent are due to drops, spills, or other accidental damage.

    > Netbooks have a roughly 20 percent higher failure rate due to hardware malfunctions than standard laptops. The more you pay for your laptop, the less likely it is to fail in general (maybe because you're more careful with it?).

    > The most reliable companies? A shocker: Toshiba and Asus, both with below a 16 percent failure rate due to hardware malfunction.

    > The least reliable brands? Acer, Gateway, and HP. HP's hardware malfunction rate, the worst in SquareTrade's analysis, is a whopping 25.6 percent.

    None of the numbers are overly surprising. As SquareTrade notes, "the typical laptop endures more use and abuse than nearly any other consumer electronic device (with the possible exception of cell phones)," so failures are really inevitable.

    Want to keep your notebook running for longer than a few years? Ensure your laptop is as drop-proofed as possible (use a padded bag or case, route cords so they won't be tripped on, lock children in another room), and protect it as best you can from heat and dust.

  • #2
    The most reliable companies? A shocker: Toshiba and Asus, both with below a 16 percent failure rate due to hardware malfunction.

    > The least reliable brands? Acer, Gateway, and HP. HP's hardware malfunction rate, the worst in SquareTrade's analysis, is a whopping 25.6 percent.
    Hmm. Asus manufactures laptops for HP.
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    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Evan
      Hmm. Asus manufactures laptops for HP.

      Perhaps HP specs a lower quality than Asus does in-house. Man, wouldn't that be a kicker. The Chinese/Tiawanese know what quality levels they can produce and make their in-house stuff better than the crap they subcon. As I have said many times, if I am going to buy cheap Chinese junk, I'm going for the cheapest and not the name brand.
      Then again, is dear old Carly still running HP?????

      andy b.
      The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

      Comment


      • #4
        Not all surprised, pack all you can in a very small space and guess what it gets HOT and what doesnt electronics like .... well HEAT.

        Plus the fact that when the laptop is open the screen makes a nice handle to pick it up by.

        I will stick to a nise big case PC.

        Peter
        I have tools I don't know how to use!!

        Comment


        • #5
          well they are harder to clean the dust and fluff out..most people wouldn't ...and i suppose if you used one like my PC 24/7, it would be less than a year before failure.

          i have to clean my CPU every 3-4 months ..luckily i have a probe monitoring it ......so i know exactly when it needs cleaning ..in my case when it goes over 48c.

          cleaning is a simple job on a pc .....i would imagine it wouldnt be that simple with a laptop.

          all the best.markj

          Comment


          • #6
            We've got 4 laptops and 5 desktops (2 Workstations) here, all but 2 are from Dell, the others are a Macbook Pro and a Toshiba laptop.

            The oldest Laptop is a Dell Precision M60 laptop workstation, bought back in early 2004 when they were *stupid* expensive. It still works very well despite having travelled to Singapore, New Zealand, and numerous trips around Europe.
            I wouldn't hesitate to recommend Dell to anyone.

            Peter

            Comment


            • #7
              Brand names are not a good way to make a buying decision when it comes to electronics and in particular computers. Rebranding is extremely common in the business and it will vary by model #, not by product line. Unless you have specific information on a particular model of a particular manufacturer you cannot depend on the brand on the product as an indication of who made the product or what quality level it is.
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              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Evan
                Brand names are not a good way to make a buying decision when it comes to electronics and in particular computers. Rebranding is extremely common in the business and it will vary by model #, not by product line. Unless you have specific information on a particular model of a particular manufacturer you cannot depend on the brand on the product as an indication of who made the product or what quality level it is.
                You can't resist it can you?

                The Dells we have are a Dimension 8200 (bought 2000), Dimension 8400 (2)(2004), T7400 Workstation (2) (2008), Precision M60 Laptop (2004), & Precision M4300 laptop (2008).
                I've had about 15 Dell machines , going back to a 'System 210' 80286 back in 1988, all have performed faultlessly.

                And unless the God of Everything knows better, all were made by Dell and not re-branded.

                Peter

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm wondering if there is a connection?, I'm picking up fairly new (to me anyways) non working LCD monitors for for free or next to free. The oldest one was only about three years old. They were not totally dead. The screens all flashed briefly and then remained black.

                  I managed to open the first free one I came across and after taking the cover off the circuit boards the first thing I noticed was three caps on what I guessed as being the power supply with bulging tops. I replaced them and bingo the thing came back to life.

                  The next two had the same problem. The monitor I am using is a 22.5in ViewSonic. I paid $10 for it.

                  All of the bad caps were the same exact value and brand, yet the three monitors were all different brand names.
                  Gene

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                  • #10
                    It don't add up. If 20.4% of failures are due to hardware malfunctions, and 10.6% are due to accidental damage, what are the other 69% of failures due to? Evil Thoughts? The Revenge of Nemesis? A "hostile work environment"?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think 31% was the total failure rate of all laptops covered by them, which means the other 69% are/were still working.

                      Peter

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by topct
                        I'm wondering if there is a connection?, I'm picking up fairly new (to me anyways) non working LCD monitors for for free or next to free. The oldest one was only about three years old. They were not totally dead. The screens all flashed briefly and then remained black.

                        I managed to open the first free one I came across and after taking the cover off the circuit boards the first thing I noticed was three caps on what I guessed as being the power supply with bulging tops. I replaced them and bingo the thing came back to life.

                        The next two had the same problem. The monitor I am using is a 22.5in ViewSonic. I paid $10 for it.

                        All of the bad caps were the same exact value and brand, yet the three monitors were all different brand names.
                        there is a whole website called badcaps.net

                        they say that a few years ago there was a asian company putting out many millions of these caps ...that failed in short time .

                        all the best.markj

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          An asian company was claimed to have sold a bad batch of electrolyte to several major capacitor manufacturers - so the story goes - and that caused what are by now very familiar problems, most commonly on motherboards from quite a few sources. But that was about ten years ago. It's supposed to be ancient history.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Peter Neill
                            The Dells we have are a Dimension 8200 (bought 2000), Dimension 8400 (2)(2004), T7400 Workstation (2) (2008), Precision M60 Laptop (2004), & Precision M4300 laptop (2008).
                            I've had about 15 Dell machines , going back to a 'System 210' 80286 back in 1988, all have performed faultlessly.
                            What Peter said. Thinkpads were bullet-proof until Lenovo (China) bought them, and now they're a crap shoot.

                            But I've since switched to the Dell Latitudes (after two debacles with Lenovo ThinkPads) and the Dell's have been great. They're very solidly built. Not very elegant or thin, but there's definitely a trade-off between chic and durable.

                            I bought my Wife an HP laptop last year, and the clam-shell on the screen has split down the middle and is falling off the LCD
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lazlo
                              What Peter said. Thinkpads were bullet-proof until Lenovo (China) bought them, and now they're a crap shoot.

                              But I've since switched to the Dell Latitudes (after two debacles with Lenovo ThinkPads) and the Dell's have been great. They're very solidly built. Not very elegant or thin, but there's definitely a trade-off between chic and durable.

                              I bought my Wife an HP laptop last year, and the clam-shell on the screen has split down the middle and is falling off the LCD
                              I have one sitting here on my desk, unused. Installing XP turned out to be impossible and Vista second choice. After an hour of screwing around trying to get it to work I closed the lid. The result is here it sits, brand new, unused.

                              My MacBook Pro has been all over America in the tour pack of my Harley, several flights to Hawaii, Texas, and California, and road trips in the Jeep to eastern Washington. I've upgraded the disk to 320G, ram to 2G, and replaced the keyboard when it got a spill. The OS has been upgraded from Tiger to Snow Leopard without a hitch, the virtual machine software gives me XP and Linux. Just wish I knew when I bought it that the Core 2 Duo was about to be released!

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