Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Storing brass pieces

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Storing brass pieces

    Any ideas for storing brass parts? Problem is I can make multiples and store them, but exposed to the air they'll tarnish. I want them to look fresh/bright & straight off the lathe. Lacquer or other clear coat is not an option. I can smear them with grease, but that's another step involved with cleaning them. Otherwise, maybe storing them in a container of odorless mineral spirits? Any other suggestions?

    Thanks,

    Gary
    Gary


    Appearance is Everything...

  • #2
    Store them in a sealed container. Tarnishing is cause by pollutants in the air so if it is sealed they won't tarnish.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

    Comment


    • #3
      glycerine bath works [in the lab anyway]
      mark

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Evan
        Store them in a sealed container. Tarnishing is cause by pollutants in the air so if it is sealed they won't tarnish.

        Im interested in this also, as well as some polished aluminum parts also. Would putting something in the container help? Wd40, silica......
        Feel free to put me on ignore....

        Comment


        • #5
          Aluminum develops an instant clear oxide coat when exposed to air and that protects it from further changes. Silica gel won't hurt but if the container is really sealed it won't make a difference either. You can buy canister sets for cheap that have rubber gaskets and that should do the job well.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

          Comment


          • #6
            Tarnishing is caused by contact with air. Not necessarily pollutants unless you call oxygen a pollutant. But even finger prints can cause tarnishing. There's a couple of good metal polishes that will last quite a while on exposed brass. Flitz, Collinite and ZoopSeal are a few. But as with anything good, be prepared to open the wallet.

            Or you could store them in a vacuum canister.

            Comment


            • #7
              Check out the cortec products
              http://www.cortecvci.com/index2.php
              You just might find what you are looking for.
              John L

              Comment


              • #8
                Tarnishing of brass is normally the result of exposure to sulphur compounds in the air. Most brasses do not tarnish from exposure to just oxygen. We have no significant sources of pollution here and if I polish brass it stays polished for years.

                This plate hasn't been cleaned in a year and the only reason it needs cleaning at all is because we cook with natural gas.

                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                Comment


                • #9
                  Get one of those vacuum sealers used for food, they have all sizes of bags. I use one to seal spare parts on my sailboat and equipment that does not get used that often. Works great keeping salt air away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Frequently used for gun storage are the heavy plastic bag inhibitors, they protect for 3 years buy emitting a vapor that protects all metals from corrosive effect of airborne pollutants including salt.

                    KleenBore is what I sold but there are others.
                    Example KleenBore # is RIL210.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Argon

                      If you have a container that truly seals you could even displace the air with argon for that stay fresh look. I do this with various finishes and it works very well.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        An obvious answer, and only suitable for smaller parts- zip loc bags. Roll the air out and seal. For long parts- I don't recall right now what it was for or where to get it- there was a roll of plastic bag material that you'd cut to length and seal both ends. Seems to me it was available at a restaurant supply place- maybe it was for sausages?. From my weakened memory- it was about 2 or 3 inches wide. Good for round tubes or bars less than 2 inches diameter.

                        Wasn't there also a CO2 dispenser that you could displace air with for storing foodstuffs-
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Perhaps you could dip the parts in hot wax.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            maybe im crazy/forgetful here, but if its the sulphur.. And brass not corrode under water, Why not just store your brass under water? Assumeing your water is low in sulphur, or you just buy some heavily filtered/purifyed water..

                            Maybe a sacrafical anode might help if it still corrodes under water?

                            Excuse any ignorance on my part this really isent my subject, Just had an idea...
                            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              How about shellac?

                              White polish/French polish just wipes on and will come off again with alcohol.
                              Paul Compton
                              www.morini-mania.co.uk
                              http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X