Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hillbilly engineering "gitn' 'er done"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hillbilly engineering "gitn' 'er done"

    Inspired by all the comments re the log splitter posted elsewhere, here's some links to some unique approaches to solutions to problems farmers have faced over the years....

    The tillage power problem..
    need 3x the power? just hook 3 tractors together!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPU033UqaR4

    Need to entertain Jr? How about tractor pulling?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQK2B...37DCC3&index=3

    There's more... a home built trencher? Will dig 2.5 times deeper than a ditch witch and was built 70 years ago...



    Need a water well? build a well house, then a mini spudder to put inside it- you'll have a well by spring!


    If you want a real scare, google up hydraulic post pounder. They're still very popular and as barbaric as the splitter posted. They typically use a hammer weighing hundreds of pounds running on guides, lifted by a small, long stroke cylinder controlled by a large size spool valve. They'll pound the end of a wooden post to splinters beside your ear if the ground is too hard or the post hits a rock (very common in some areas)
    Last edited by camdigger; 11-25-2009, 11:34 AM.
    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

  • #2
    More hillbilly engineering.... Still gettin er done...

    If you don't care for hydraulics, there's the mechanical version run off the PTO.

    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

    Comment


    • #3
      Commercial engineering wasn`t too user friendly either. Anyone recognize this..



      These were in every shop in the neighborhood at one time. Real finger eaters with all that open gearing
      Last edited by camdigger; 11-25-2009, 12:35 PM.
      Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

      Comment


      • #4
        Fence post drivers aren't as barbaric as you might think. You can still buy new ones. Among others, Jet makes at least one.

        How else are you going to put in a mile of fencing with posts in the ground nice and tight? You can't get 'em that tight by digging holes for them.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Dan

          I`m very familiar with post pounders. I`ve personally put in thousands of posts with their assistance and using a big maul. They are efficient and quick, but an unguarded, several hundred pound hammer free falling less than 3`from the operator`s ear, and you`re telling me they`re not barbaric. Just try to get that past the OSHA hand wringer crowd.. Agriculture by and large, operates under a different level of scutiny to say the least.

          There are alternatives, but more $. For example, there`s a newer style vibe unit around.
          Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

          Comment


          • #6
            So what is the yellow thing? Looks like an air coupled reduction shaft.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nope. Ask a steam fan.

              As another clue, the steel safety fence is 4`high.
              Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

              Comment


              • #8
                I suppose our definitions of barbaric differ.

                IMHO, yep, they're plenty dangerous just like many, many pieces of farm machinery. Barbaric? Not in my opinion. They are a simple, elegant solution to performing a difficult task.

                When I first heard of them I was amazed that 12' long, 8" diameter fence posts could be pounded into the ground for 4'. What a neat invention. Simple and effective.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dp
                  So what is the yellow thing? Looks like an air coupled reduction shaft.
                  It is a Baker fan with a shroud.
                  Jim H.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I didn`t say they weren`t effective, nor that they weren`t currently and widely available, nor that I`d never use or used one.

                    They are not, however, without their inherent hazards.

                    It`s even possible to smack yourself on the head with the mast if the unit has all hydraulic tilts...

                    For those unfamilar with post pounders, here`s a link.
                    http://www.wheatheart.com/category.a...CSZ4hlV4VUlgN3

                    There`s even a video.
                    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JCHannum
                      It is a Baker fan with a shroud.
                      And a propellor driven airplane....has what shrouding ?

                      Oh please O.S.H.A. don't read this...

                      Farm machinery, in particular is meant to be "guarded" by
                      keeping some distance away. Shielded p.t.o. shafts
                      are helpfull, and choppers and shredders are shielded
                      for flying "out of the machine", not "sticking fingers
                      into machine".

                      Post pounders are popular here in grape country, a simple
                      guard could be fashioned over the ram, (the pinch point)
                      but the post being pounded is the variable, and could
                      explode (as written above), so maybe a simple "blast shield"
                      could be fashioned for the operator.

                      Punch presses....now there O.S.H.A. changes it's tune.
                      They wan't those guarded so you cannot get into
                      anything, no matter how hard you try.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JCHannum
                        It is a Baker fan with a shroud.
                        Ding, Ding, Ding! We have a winner!

                        An early dynomometer for steam engines and other assorted tractors. The different flat pulleys are for assessing different HP ranges. Here's what they look like in use....

                        Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have never seen one with a shroud before.

                          Abner Baker was an innovator in steam engineering. He manufactured traction engines, invented the Baker Reverse gear as well as the Baker fan. I am sure there were quite a few more innovations that can be attributed to him.

                          He is a local man, the AD Baker Company was located in Swanton, Ohio, about ten miles from here. Remnants of the original buildings still exist.
                          Jim H.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I put in about a 100 posts with the Wheatheart model this summer. It is an awesome machine with a ton of features and safety features. The ground really shakes when the 660# hammer comes down.

                            Looking at the old post pounder I cringed at all the ways things could go terribly wrong. The good thing is that it's better than a "widow maker" - a 14# post maul.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=JCHannum]I have never seen one with a shroud before.

                              QUOTE]

                              I didn't know they came any other way
                              Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X