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Another whatsit.. possibly aircraft engine related

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  • Another whatsit.. possibly aircraft engine related

    This odd gizmo has been kicking around for a while, unidentified.

    The taper is an MT2, no tang, no drawbar thread.

    It is labeled P&W, with USAC marked on it. Might be related to the machine tools or to engines, I have no way to know.

    The parts rotate to about a 45 deg angle either way, and clamp with the thumbscrew

    Otherwise just as you see it. It obviously had some particular purpose, and I'm just plain curious what it was. Someone should know.





    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    Back spot facer??

    --Doozer
    DZER

    Comment


    • #3
      A chamfering tool. you can bore with it too if you want to dick around.

      Comment


      • #4
        Looks like a heavy duty adjustable paint scraper! Whatever it is it appears to be well made.
        Jim

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Doozer
          Back spot facer??

          --Doozer
          That was going to be my guess too. Doesn't look like it would cut where it would need to though.
          Stuart de Haro

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          • #6
            Chamfering tool maybe, that makes sense. I wondered if it was something like that, couldn't really think of anything else that needed a MT2 shank and would have those parts.

            The only problem with the chamfering tool idea is that the clamp arrangement doesn't look nearly secure enough to hold it in any particular position, it's just a thumbscrew on a thread no bigger than maybe 8-32. It would have to center itself by the cutter shape, and the total force would have to be taken by that screw shank.

            Back spot facer I don't think works. Those must have some way to take off the cutter and replace it easily with the shank through the part. usually just a pin on the driving shaft and an "L" groove arrangement in the cutter. And this won't hold the blade right for that anyway.

            Somebody probably knows exactly, and has actually used one of these. I don't think it was a shop made special, but I suppose it COULD have been made from a drill, if the flutes and tang were cut off, and all the markings (except for "P&W") were on the cut-off part.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Comment


            • #7
              Possibly some sort of angle transfer / layout / set-up tool?

              Comment


              • #8
                It was used for cleaning up the valve seat bowl area on packard marine engine cylinder heads. Next time come up with something hard.
                Non, je ne regrette rien.

                Comment


                • #9
                  J T,

                  Held together with a thumbscrew? - I think you need a woodworking forum

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Peter S
                    J T,

                    Held together with a thumbscrew? - I think you need a woodworking forum
                    I suppose you DID miss mention of the "P&W" and "USAC" marks then.

                    The set-up tool idea is possible. I had originally thought of a grinder tooth stop holder or something like that, but after I noticed the taper was an MT2 that sort of dropped-out of contention.

                    What sort of set-up?
                    Last edited by J Tiers; 11-30-2009, 09:57 AM.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't think that anything with P&W is related to aircraft, or even engines in general. I forget the history, but P&W machinery and the engine plant are 2 separate entities with a common name.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hmmm...I have something very similar with the P&W marks on it to and I always wondered what it was originally for. It has an MT3 (with a drive tang) and a straight portion of shaft sticking out the other end in similar proportions. I think I remember a flatted portion on the end of that straight section too, but the one I have was evenly cut away on both sides as I recall. No holes though so I never figured out what if anything went on the ends. I was thinking more of gauging tooling or a setup fixture. Maybe something like a piece to go into a tailstock and then clamped in the chuck jaws for quick tailstock alignment. I think I recall some circumfrential scarring on the shaft like maybe it could have been a part of a tailstock mounted die holder (missing a mating piece that holds the die and is a slip fit on the straight shaft.

                        I will try to remember to take pictures and reply tonight.

                        Paul
                        Paul Carpenter
                        Mapleton, IL

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          J T,
                          you really need to start getting the tools *WITH* the instructions

                          Dave

                          ps, I have no idea what its for, but look forward to finding out.
                          Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by small.planes
                            ps, I have no idea what its for, but look forward to finding out.
                            Me too!

                            If it hasn't shown up as anything definite by now, we're probably tapped-out.

                            P&W....... yes, might be the machines folks or the engine ones....... The source was someone who worked at McDonnell Aircraft (he's long gone, so I can't ask). That overlaps both, aircraft (he didn't always work there) and machinery.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Took a look in a old Pratt&Whitney Small Tools book No.13 I have,
                              Nothing even close.

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