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I had a nightmare.

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  • I had a nightmare.

    Last night I dreamed I was drilling through some aluminum on my mill, clamped directly to the table... and I dreamed I drilled a 1/4" hole right into my table
    but then I woke up and everything was ok.

    Should I see a psychatrist? Or just buy a 1/2" thick sheet of tooling plate to perminately attach over the table of my mill? :P
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

  • #2
    Someone butchered mine up......
    Feel free to put me on ignore....

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    • #3
      You'll do it sometime. Then you'll remember not to after that.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Black_Moons

        Should I see a psychatrist?


        You just need to get out more, way more...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Black_Moons
          Last night I dreamed I was drilling through some aluminum on my mill, clamped directly to the table... and I dreamed I drilled a 1/4" hole right into my table
          but then I woke up and everything was ok.

          Should I see a psychatrist? Or just buy a 1/2" thick sheet of tooling plate to perminately attach over the table of my mill? :P
          Put a 1/2" thick piece of plate glass on the mill table. You won't drill through that.

          andy b.
          The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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          • #6
            I bought a used mill/drill and the table had MANY divots. It was still flat and works fine. I assumed that ANY used machine looked this bad, but I guess this one was used by an anvil breaker. In any case, I wish it was perfect, but it isnt, and I just ignore the itty-bitty dimples. Duffy
            Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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            • #7
              Parallels?

              Guys...just set the work up on some 3/4" parallels, with a clamp on either end. You still have to be sure that there are no parallels under where you want to drill but it will keep the holes where they belong, in the work. I usually use 4 parallels, one on either end and one on either side of where the hole is to be drilled.

              Just a side note. Using strap clamps with a jack screw in the tail end, be sure to put a piece of scrap between the screw and the table or you will end up with some not-so-nice dimples in your table.
              Jim (KB4IVH)

              Only fools abuse their tools.

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              • #8
                When I am drilling through a piece clamped directly on to the mill table, I always make sure the drill bit is centered on a T-slot if I'm drilling a half inch hole or less, other wise I use some thing for parallels to give me a cushion. Those cheap a** chinese 1-2-3 blocks work very well for that!
                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                • #9
                  Mdf is so useful--- screw a piece onto the table and drill away until the piece is so buggered up you can't keep a workpiece flat on it anymore. Then replace it. Most of the time I don't bother to screw it down, unless I need it to work as a fence as well. Ordinary wood screws work well to control edges for multiple drilling ops and for special holding ops.

                  I haven't drilled into my table for years now.

                  Works on the milling machine as well. If I can't place a workpiece so a milling cutter can go into a t-slot, I'll just cut a build-up from mdf and sandwich it between the table and the workpiece.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    That is what parallels are made for. To hold the work above the table so you can drill and mill through with out hitting the table.
                    Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                    http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                    http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Black_Moons
                      Last night I dreamed I was drilling through some aluminum on my mill, clamped directly to the table... and I dreamed I drilled a 1/4" hole right into my table
                      but then I woke up and everything was ok.

                      Should I see a psychatrist? Or just buy a 1/2" thick sheet of tooling plate to perminately attach over the table of my mill? :P

                      i did that for real. . . now i have a place for the drill to actually go incase i need to drill directly on the table. sure is nice and shiney in that spot. .

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                      • #12
                        Consider buying two Kurt type vises for your mill. With the jaws at the extreme ends of the vise you can clamp most everything and usually find some "air" for any drilling operation.

                        The great advantage of this is you can start dreaming about new tools rather than damage to old ones.

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                        • #13
                          Black_Moons, I feel your pain about the dream, sometimes they come true.

                          With that said I never drill anything flat on my mill table period.

                          The man I bought my mill and lathe from was a super good machinist and worked at Oak Ridge during WWII. He bought a brand new mill and lathe in 1984. His wife is a German born woman, high strung and hot headed. Well, she helped him in his home shop in the basement and one day she was drilling a plate on the table and when she lifted the plate there was a 3/8" about 1/4" deep in the table. She got to cussing in German and going wild and he left the basement and waited for her to calm down. She never drilled a hole in the table again and she used that mill as much as he did. I have left the hole for sentimental reasons.

                          When I bought them and got them out of the basement about 11 years later they still looked like new but had gotten a lot of use. Getting them out of the basement was a great feat and taking the mill home in the back of my Ford Courier was interesting.
                          It's only ink and paper

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                          • #14
                            We used tooling plates on the Cincinnati Milacron where I used to work. Made them in house out of 2" plate. One day the new guy that knew it all...we'll call him "Ben" cuz that's his real name, failed to remove some old offsets from a program he had never ran before. Well, the new plates being 2 inches thick raised the Z origin by 2 inches. He cut a full 12" diameter circle in one and half way around the other before he bothered to notice. Actually after Blanchard grinding the plates they came out about .095" shy of 2 inches. The table below the tooling plates still bears the scars.

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                            • #15
                              I'm with Lane on this one

                              Use that mill to make a nice matched set of Heavy 6" x 1 1/2" x 1/2" parallels. Find some one here on the board close to you with a surface grinder and grind them in together.

                              I use mine all the time

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