Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

train wheel gages

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • train wheel gages

    i bought a lot of tooling and these were in the lot all i could find was they are for measuring steel train wheels. I dont know if they are old or not but figured they are since trains are not as common as they used to be.







    jason

  • #2
    Jason, cast iron wheels have been illegal for about 50 years. As a railfan I have a mild interest. Are they for sale?

    Comment


    • #3
      Take another look -

      That gage says cast or wrought STEEL wheels so it might still be in use somewhere.

      Comment


      • #4
        I though everybody has a few of those kicking around, if I knew they were sought after I would not have ''recycled'' so many.

        Steve

        Comment


        • #5
          To quote a supervisor I worked with here at the mine...

          "The wheel caliper is about $800 and the RR regulation book was $250."

          That I believe is the going rate for 2009 ,but don't quote me on that..LOL

          The real fun begins when you load everything into the 1930's Niles wheel lathe.
          NRA member

          Gun control is using both hands

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dilligaf
            i bought a lot of tooling and these were in the lot all i could find was they are for measuring steel train wheels. I dont know if they are old or not but figured they are since trains are not as common as they used to be.
            You make it sound like trains are a quaint relic of the past with few still in operation. Here in the US, trains are the backbone of our freight transportation network. Market share, Passenger transport and miles of track and even the number of rail cars are down from a century ago but trains carry more freight today than they ever have in the US. 10 times more. Rail traffic has increased substantially since the 1960s (47% increase in payload over the 17 years ending in 2007). Intermodal traffic has quadrupled between 1980 and 2007. More payload ton-miles are carried by train than truck. Rail carries more freight in the US than any other mode of transportation. Traffic was stagnant from about 64 to 1980, when railroads were allowed to lower their rates. There are about 140,500 miles of railroad track in this country. The peak track mileage was around 1916 at 254,037miles. Probably less siding and short branch lines since trucks tend to carry the "last mile". Around 1916, there were 40,000 miles of railroad bancrupt, during the great depression about 70,000 miles of railroad went into bancruptcy, and around 1979, railroads were on the verge of bancruptcy again even though traffic was actually still climbing as market share declined. Profits per ton are lower.

            In 2007, US railroads carried 1.771 trillion ton miles of freight. In 1916, this was apparently just 343billion.

            In 2006 and 2007, railroads hauled more freight than ever before — so much, in fact, that they began facing serious capacity constraints on parts of their networks. Rail traffic has fallen in 2008 and 2009 due to weakness in the economy, but experts agree that, over the long term, demand for freight transportation will rise sharply.
            http://www.aar.org/~/media/AAR/Backg...ay%202009.ashx
            Railroad billions of ton miles by year:
            1890 76
            1900 142
            1910 255
            1920 414
            1930 386
            1940 375
            1950 592
            1960 575
            1970 771
            1980 932
            1990 1091
            2000 1534

            http://www.aar.org/PubCommon/Documen...y/Overview.pdf
            http://www.american-rails.com/railroad-history.html
            http://home.netcom.com/~whstlpnk/tteusra1.html
            http://www.hks.harvard.edu/taubmance...lo_05_rail.pdf
            http://www.pbs.org/fmc/book/pdf/ch13.pdf
            http://www.trainweb.org/moksrail/adv...ays/coston.htm

            Now, in Europe, passenger rail is more common than here but freight rail has a much lower percentage of market share. I have been told, incidentally, that passenger rail has never been profitable in the US and that no national passenger rail system makes a profit. They are subsidized. Likewise Airlines and highways. "all forms of intercity commercial passenger transportation are money-losers-if you calculate all of their costs in the same way we calculate the costs of passenger trains." from The Myth of Passenger train Profitability

            --
            The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated -- Mark Twain

            Comment

            Working...
            X