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  • I need an engraving pen

    Anyone use one of the Chicago Pneumatic pens like the CP710? Anything else you'd recommend? This is for marking tools and such in my shop, not a production environment. I have a bunch of new Starrett micrometers I need to put my name on.
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    NOT!
    Just for wrenches and things and marking some info on other items. No precision metrology equipment will be defaced by me.

    andy b.
    The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

  • #2
    For instruments I would recommend the Snap On 12V electric marking pen.
    My first choice would be one of the chemical etching kits. To me these are preferable to the carbide stylus type engraving.
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

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    • #3
      I have an older Dremel electric engraver and I like it a lot. I like the convenience of electric over air for tools like this.

      Here is a link to the new model.
      http://www.dremel.com/en-us/Tools/Pa...id=290-01+Tool
      Jonathan P.

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      • #4
        When I worked in the maintenance department at a bakery we had one of those electric engravers (I don't know if it was a Dremel or Snap-On or ???). It could barely engrave plastic. On things like Craftsman wrenches it would barely scratch your name into the surface.
        When I worked at the GE locomotive rebuilding facility they had an air engraving pen (I think it was an Ingersoll-Rand model). I think you could engrave diamonds with it. Yeah, it probably cost 20x what the Dremel electric model does, and it was like all things in the locomotive shop, built to be abused by guys who didn't care. I don't quite need the lifetime of engraving power a $500 I-R pneumatic pen gives me, but I don't mind paying a few dollars for something that will engrave at least chrome-plated Craftsman wrenches.

        Now maybe the new Dremel engravers work pretty good (the one I used was probably 15 years ago). So japcas and Boucher, were these newer models you guys used and did they really seem to be able to engrave things? I might be willing to try one if you guys have had some positive results.

        The chemical etching would be too much trouble for my use, and wouldn't work in several of the situations I contemplate using it. I have to admit, chemical etch does do a nice job, even on glass.

        andy b.
        The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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        • #5
          anyone seen these arc pens? ive been trying to source one for samples, we used to have one with a silver electrode but it died on me and i cant seem to fix it
          mark

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          • #6
            Originally posted by andy_b
            . I have a bunch of new Starrett micrometers I need to put my name on.
            .
            .
            .
            .
            .
            NOT!
            Just for wrenches and things and marking some info on other items. No precision metrology equipment will be defaced by me.

            andy b.
            That's unfortunate. If you have a lot of outside visitors and you want to keep them you will have to make them less desireable to own. A splotch of orange paint on part of everything you want to keep will protect it. No body wants it after it's "spoiled"
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
            Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

            It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Your Old Dog
              That's unfortunate. If you have a lot of outside visitors and you want to keep them you will have to make them less desireable to own. A splotch of orange paint on part of everything you want to keep will protect it. No body wants it after it's "spoiled"
              I worked with a guy who painted his tools hot pink. No one would touch them and he could spot them a mile away.

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              • #8
                my dad has an ancient electric engraver that works like a champ.

                iirc, there's no identifying information on it at all, but it's bright blue plastic with a white cord and power switch and the plastic molding of the plug is like 1/16" or thinner and scares the hell out of me to handle when plugging/unplugging the thing because i think the prongs are going to break through the insulation and shock me.
                -paul

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by boslab
                  anyone seen these arc pens? ive been trying to source one for samples, we used to have one with a silver electrode but it died on me and i cant seem to fix it
                  mark
                  We had one at a place that I used to work. It was a large transformer of some sort that converted 120vac to dc cut I dont know the output voltage or current. It worked well for marking but it would on occasion stick (similar to stick welding) and you would have to tip the "pen" left and right to break it free. It did make nice smooth lines if you were consistent on your motion and the tip was new.

                  I'll see if I can find its name.

                  rock~
                  Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                  • #10
                    I was looking at chemical etching yesterday at work to mark some P20 tooling we have at some suppliers. I was impressed by the systems out there. It looks like the way to go. One company has a stencil that can be made in one of those Brother label makers. Then the fluid and the electric current is applied.
                    It would seem to me that once you figured out the electrolyte the rest could be easy made DIY.
                    I imagine Evan could share more light on this. The power unit looks like its just a low voltage transformer nothing else.
                    Anyone used the chemical etch systems?
                    Dave

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                    • #11
                      Try phosphoric acid. When I accidentally touched the work piece to the SS pan in my epolish setup it burned a really nice liitle round hole in it instantly.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 50BMGBOB
                        I worked with a guy who painted his tools hot pink. No one would touch them and he could spot them a mile away.
                        I have some that are red and light purple. I always get teased about it, but so far no one has stolen any of them.

                        andy b.
                        The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          At the paper mill years ago, one of the millwrights painted his tools baby blue. Some turned up missing, he found them in an open toolbox that belonged to a contractor. When he retrieved them, the owner of the toolbox objected with his fist. Though Gus was short he was big around and all muscle. He dodged the guy's swing and caught him by the front of his shirt. According to the witnesses Gus hit the guy in the face three times and blood flew each time. When Gus let go the guy slumped to the ground and had to be carried out.

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                          • #14
                            Try this home made device.
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YagzeIZQeN4
                            Peter
                            I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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                            • #15
                              I have my Dads tools marked back in the 50's with the Snap On 12V Stylus. They are Very readable. I have paint marked my tools with Blue & Red paint to segergate tools to the correct truck. My wife has gotten so bad at borrowing tools and then trying to claim them that I have started marking hers with Pink paint but that is a battle that I am probably going to loose.
                              Byron Boucher
                              Burnet, TX

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