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Skookum lathe table 3

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  • Skookum lathe table 3

    Up and running!


    I opened the gear box lid to check for sand, bits of Cheng Shin tires, and mice etc. Gotta say, I'm impressed with the parts in there. No plastic gears and the oil bath looks like it works.

    I faced some brass and parted off some stainless steel standoffs. I'm pretty happy with it right now.

    Mike
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

  • #2
    Let me be the first to say very good looking table its very heavyduty looking nice job,,,what kind of lathe is that???

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    • #3
      That lathe is from Busy Bee Tools. I have the same one. Its a Chinese import, but quite a nice lathe.---Brian
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #4
        Same here

        I have the same lathe - it came as a very good 3-in-1. Milling head was very good but I removed it to fit a taper-turning attachment.

        The lathe is - as others have said - very good.

        Low speed is a bit too high but OK.

        No quick-change (aka "Norton") gear-box or power feeds, but I prefer to hand-feed anyway. Changing the gear train for screw-threading is not a problem.

        It is accurate and robust - but it is NOT a production lathe - but is pretty well ideal for a small>medium HSM shop.

        Comment


        • #5
          Ok, now I've seen all three posts on this lathe and the bench. Nice job. Now to beautify that wall-- Personal preference of course, but there's no other raw surface that I dislike to see as much as chipboard. Particle board comes close though. I have a piece of white coroplast behind my lathe, and besides covering the raw gyproc it brightens the area as well.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            Covering that wall is a good tip, expect the wall behind your lathe to slowly get coated in cutting oil, especialy near the chuck.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              Not knowing you, I'd have thought this a simple lift up onto your table. Of course, my thumbs no longer like me turning in screws with hex L keys from the no leverage side. 52 and falling apart too fast for my taste.

              Was there a reason you couldn't just lift it on your own or get you and a bud to lift it? Just curious.

              Now for the important stuff. Whatcha going to make?


              Clutch

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              • #8
                i dont think one person could lift that lathe onto the bench. However, there is a couple holes for a 3/4" bar that makes it really easy for 2 people to move it around.

                When i moved mine, two of us carrier ot out of the back of the truck, halfway through the house, down the stairs and across the basement with only stopping once.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by darryl
                  Ok, now I've seen all three posts on this lathe and the bench. Nice job. Now to beautify that wall-- Personal preference of course, but there's no other raw surface that I dislike to see as much as chipboard. Particle board comes close though. I have a piece of white coroplast behind my lathe, and besides covering the raw gyproc it brightens the area as well.
                  I hear you guys. I'm already looking for places to put stuff and will likely cover the Aspenite with 1/2" plywood and shelves and places for chuck keys and center drills and...

                  I had plans for drawers underneath but I need to make chips now!

                  Mike
                  Mike

                  My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dragons_fire
                    i dont think one person could lift that lathe onto the bench. However, there is a couple holes for a 3/4" bar that makes it really easy for 2 people to move it around.

                    When i moved mine, two of us carrier ot out of the back of the truck, halfway through the house, down the stairs and across the basement with only stopping once.
                    WilliamG suggested I buy those bars and I did. I used one of them to lever the headstock over. I'm pretty sure 3 guys like me would have got hurt trying to muscle it even with the bars.

                    Thanks again to William for pointing out the casting holes. That saved some grief.

                    BTW
                    I'm really happy to have joined this forum. You guys are REALLY helpful. and quick to respond.
                    I'll try to help too but all I've done so far is help convince Ernie to chuck out his RTL (junk).

                    Mike
                    Mike

                    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by clutch
                      Not knowing you, I'd have thought this a simple lift up onto your table. Of course, my thumbs no longer like me turning in screws with hex L keys from the no leverage side. 52 and falling apart too fast for my taste.

                      Was there a reason you couldn't just lift it on your own or get you and a bud to lift it? Just curious.

                      Now for the important stuff. Whatcha going to make?


                      Clutch
                      Couldn't budge the sucker.

                      Gonna make swarf.

                      Already started!
                      Mike

                      My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Black_Moons
                        Covering that wall is a good tip, expect the wall behind your lathe to slowly get coated in cutting oil, especialy near the chuck.
                        I just put a piece of Plexiglas behind my lathe to keep the oil off the wall. I would guess any oil-resistant surface would work just as well.

                        andy b.
                        The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A couple of times I've made shallow shelves on the wall behind my lathe to keep often used things readily visible. I'd recommend a lexan cover to keep the parts in and the swarf out. I also want as part of that to have a dedicated set of drill bits, allen wrenches, etc that will stay with the lathe.

                          The first set of shelves was black with a black back. After I moved the lathe to a different location, the shelves are black also, but the back is white. When I get around to re-doing it, everything will be white, and will have a couple of lexan or plexiglas doors, full width but each only about 8-12 inches high and hinged on their bottoms. This way they will not have to swing out to open, and they can hang straight down or nearly so when open, so I'm not going to bash my head on a corner.

                          I have a shallow box of shelves between the drill presses, and they open the normal way, like kitchen cupboards. I don't really like that now, though the doors do double duty by holding more parts.

                          One other thing- where my lathe was previously, I had an overhead light, but it was a bit dark behind the lathe. Partially because of the shelves. I installed a light under the shelves and that made a good difference. It doesn't shine out at me, just lights up the area behind the lathe. In the new location, I hung the light so it would shine more light towards the back than I would have thought appropriate. It's sort of filling in the shadows, and even though you don't go looking around the back side of the lathe so much when you're working at it, it's easier on the eyes when you're staring at the cutting tool.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Gonna make swarf

                            Up and running!

                            Congratulations Mike, no sweeter words than 'up and running'.

                            Great looking bench ....!!

                            B2227L lathe owners are growing in numbers and rightly so.

                            Enjoy Mike
                            Veteran - I served our country because it was the right thing to do.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great job on the table Mike! Please, before it's oil soaked and too late, get a couple coats of sturdy grey paint on it...or a color to match the lathe.

                              Easy for me to say 'cuz I rarely get my projects to the painted stage either but man, now's the time.
                              Milton

                              "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                              "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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