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Not OT, but probably off my rocker

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  • Not OT, but probably off my rocker

    I had an idea a couple of weeks ago, and it's been bugging me a little since then. Say you wanted to make a model boat prop- what would be wrong with using spoons for the blades? Sure, you'd have to cut the tang off and machine an arc on the remaining part so it can be attached to a hub, and rig a holding device so they can all be machined the same. You'd save yourself from having to form the scoop shape, and extending the idea slightly, you'd also be able to create a cw or ccw rotation prop. You'd be limited in the pitch you could produce, of course.

    Am I nuts or a genius? I'll start the voting- 1 for nuts.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Probably work if you could align the setting angle of the spoon curvature to the helicoid corresponding to the prop pitch you desire.

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    • #3
      Not nuts

      Not a perfect aerofoil shape, but better than carving from scratch without 4 axis mill...

      Props are complicated

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propeller#Marine
      Last edited by Bguns; 12-05-2009, 06:37 AM.

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      • #4
        Uhhh, Maybe we grew up with diffrent spoons, but I don't see spoons making a good prop surface.. Knife blades maybe.. spoon handles.. maybe.. But spoons?
        http://images.google.ca/images?hl=en...-8&sa=N&tab=wi
        None of those look very spoon like

        this side on view shows they are nearly flat.. the general 'area' is the same and you maybe plan to flaten out the spoons and just did'nt mention it..
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          a prop is just a double(triple, quadruple) start screw.

          in theory you could get there on a lathe


          using a spoon is just the wrong way to go about it.

          heres some old pictures of the finish maching of a race boat prop

          time to get a univeral mill



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          • #6

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            • #7

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              • #8
                here is a link to making a pattern for a prop casting ,

                http://industrialshapeandform.com/bl...ller&submit=Go

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                • #9
                  What sort of model boat prop? More to the point, what sort of model boat? There is a big difference between a tug boat and a hydrofoil.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by darryl
                    I had an idea a couple of weeks ago, and it's been bugging me a little since then. Say you wanted to make a model boat prop- what would be wrong with using spoons for the blades? Sure, you'd have to cut the tang off and machine an arc on the remaining part so it can be attached to a hub, and rig a holding device so they can all be machined the same. You'd save yourself from having to form the scoop shape, and extending the idea slightly, you'd also be able to create a cw or ccw rotation prop. You'd be limited in the pitch you could produce, of course.

                    Am I nuts or a genius? I'll start the voting- 1 for nuts.
                    It would work. I've seen some pictures somewhere where the person hammered spoon shapes out of flat brass, trimmed them to shape, and soldered them to a hub.

                    You are not nuts.
                    Gene

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                    • #11
                      I don't know what kind of boat. The application could be as an impeller for a water power system as well. Some of those things look kinda scoopy, like spoons.

                      Not one of my best ideas, ok.

                      Gene, thanks for the kind words. You don't know me- I am nuts.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        While I wasd trying to make a go-devil out of a weedwacker motor everybody said you needed to get a trolling motor prop to get all the power out the little motor. Well, one of the person just took an eight inch piece of two inch by 3/32 piece of stainless and twisted it in a vise and it worked very well. Go for it.

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                        • #13
                          Boat props are not spoon shaped---But---You could make a great impeller for a Pelton wheel!!!
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • #14
                            I made a prop for my grandsons RC boat by making a hub and cutting three slots in it at the angle of the blade at its root. The blades were cut from brass shim stock shaped by hand then soldered into the slots in the hub. It worked.
                            Good luck
                            John R

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                            • #15
                              I don't see why it wouldn't work for a model boat. For the nay sayers, remember the key words, "model boat" and unless he is entering it in a scale contest it would do the job.

                              He could only use a portion of the spoon and maybe reshape it some but it will do the job.
                              It's only ink and paper

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