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  • Back Spot Facing Tools

    Does anybody have any words of wisdom for these tools? I have a repetitive need to bore a hole through 1" thick ring of 316L stainless and to be back spot faced on the ID. The 1" thick rings vary in diameter from 2.5" ID to 18" ID. The OD of the back spot facing would be .6" diameter and the depth would vary depending on diameter of the ring. Basically I need a flat on the inner ID of the ring.

    I am looking for ideas as far as manufacturers you like, tool styles, etc. I have looked at several and do not know what the advantages are of say Vermont Indexables, http://www.vermontindexable.com/tools.html, versus a Cogsdill, http://www.cogsdill.com/PDF/USCatalo...utBrochure.pdf

    Thanks in Advance,
    P/R

  • #2
    The old style spot facing buttons would be alot cheaper. If you are a business then you would justify the newer tools.

    I dont remember the correct name of the types I used.Just a round button style with cutting teeth like a chamfer tool but has a bore and a keyway.Simple.I will see if I can find one to show.

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    • #3
      How big is the hole? If the hole it big enough you can set a boring bar up to bore the hole and another to do the spot face on the back. No need to buy special tools to do it.
      It's only ink and paper

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      • #4
        "How big is the hole? If the hole is big enough you can set a boring bar up to bore the hole and another to do the spot face on the back. No need to buy special tools to do it."

        The hole is .375".

        I do not mind buying the tool since this will be a repeat job. I do not own a boring bar that would lend itself to leaving me a right angle shoulder if bored in reverse. Am I missing something here?

        P/R

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        • #5
          The advantage of the Cogsdill is that it can be done with a drill or milling machine without any other setup. The tool is inserted through the hole on the same axis as it was drilled, the cutter flips out and the relief is cut.

          With the Vermont, the tool must be used in a boring head. Either the tool is inserted and the boring head is dialed out to the diameter of the backface or the workpiece must be juggled back and forth to insert and retract the cutter.

          The Cogsdill is much simpler and quicker to use.
          Jim H.

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