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Elmers #33 Mill Engine---Kind of---

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  • Elmers #33 Mill Engine---Kind of---

    I have decided to build Elmer Verbergs #33 mill engine--Kind of. I modelled it as per Elmers drawings yesterday, and although his version is very pretty, there are many things that can be simplified without compromising the way the engine works. My smallest fastener that I "stock" is #5-40 shcs., so the engine has been modified to accomodate them. I am working with a box full of scrap aluminum "shorts" from one of my fabricators, so the plans have been modified to suit the peices I have. My smallest end mill is 1/8" diameter, so again, the plans will be tweaked to work with that. Since I have to create detail drawings to work with, I will post them here as usual in case any of you chaps care to build it too. I hope you follow my build, and I hope we have fun.---brian

    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 12-09-2009, 07:56 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    There's a cylinder in there somewhere!!! I started with a piece of 1 1/2" plate, cut it to 1 1/2" square, set it up in the mill to add a center hole to each end, and drilled one corner for a 3/16" rod which is my drive key when turning between centers. I left one end of it square to act as a reference surface for milling the flat sides on the cylinder. I'm not certain that this is the correct way, but its one of them "Figure it out as I go along" things.

    Brian Rupnow

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    • #3
      Brian- Have you ever thought of running your engines off of vacuum?
      I was thinking of using engine vacuum from the manifold of an automotive engine to use one of these small steam engine designs to run windshield wipers. I have an old truck with vacuum wipers, and it sure would be neat to use a small steam engine to drive them. If 30" of vac = 15 psi, then one of these engines would need to be able to produce enough torque to power the wipers at say about 8 psi.
      Just thinking out loud.

      -Doozer
      DZER

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      • #4
        Vacuum is the cheap mans reverse.
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          I had a little confusion going about the air inlet and outlet tubes, so this picture shows the "corrected" version. Doozer---these engines will work on either suck or blow.
          Brian Rupnow

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          • #6
            They will sort of work with vacuum, but it must pull through the exhaust port, it will not reverse the engine's rotation.
            Jim H.

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            • #7
              So, here we are, set up in the mill and milling the flat areas on the cylinder body.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • #8
                Machining the valve ports---
                Brian Rupnow

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                • #9
                  This is my new chamfering tool in use. I coloured it red with layout dye so I wouldn't keep picking it up and trying to use it as a normal end mill. It works great--in fact, it works so good that I chamfered the one corner where the boss for the exhaust pipe sticks up completely away, then realized that "Hey!!! --That was only supposed to be a partial chamfer!!!"--Oh well, I'm the designer--I'll just change the plan to match the part.
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    Here we are, set up to drill the holes that run on an angle from the ports to the end of the cylinder bore. I love my 'Tilt a Whirl" vice!! It really works well for this type of thing.
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • #11
                      And here we are, almost finished. I have to tap 18 holes and then this part should be good to go. I didn't drill and ream the bore untill after I had the small holes drilled that are shown in the previous post, because they start so close to the bore that I thought it would be difficult to start the drill if the 1/2" bore was there. The hole you see in the previous post was drilled and reamed to 3/8" diameter, then after the small holes were drilled I put the cylinder back in the lathe and finished opening the bore out to 1/2" diameter.
                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • #12
                        This is the drawing of the cylinder. Busy little devil, isn't it!!! Don't worry too much about saving it, I will post a download link when I get the engine finished.
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #13
                          Nice work, but I suggest that you take a look at the photo of my cylinder and review Rich Carlstedt's comments on port sizing and spacing. I doubt that you will be able to get the engine to operate with that layout, if you do, timing will be very difficult.
                          Jim H.

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                          • #14
                            JCHannum--You could be right, but what I have shown is exactly the same in the port area as Elmer did on his #33 engine, and his worked fine.---Brian
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #15
                              Brian; I will never say never, and your engine uses a spool valve, so that will be a bit different. With steam, the exhaust passages are typically larger due to expansion. For a strictly compressed air engine, that is not as critical, but is still a consideration.

                              I am used to engines with D valves and sealing between the ports could be more problematical with that layout.
                              Jim H.

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