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Shim Stock Metal...all the same? Or some better?

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  • Shim Stock Metal...all the same? Or some better?

    I have to shim the column my X3 mill...I have steel shim material at home; the school has brass shim material. And by george, a beer can makes some nice .004 aluminum shim stock.

    Is there any reason one type of metal shim would function better than another, for a particular application?

  • #2
    I have used Post-It notes many times.

    --Doozer
    DZER

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    • #3
      bolster: Corrosion is one factor. AFAIK aluminum shims may react with steel given the right electrolyte. Brass I believe is often used as it tends not to corrode other metals.. But im not 100% sure.
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        I used a diet dr pepper can on mine. So far so good.

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        • #5
          I use heavy duty aluminum foil, fold to thickness and trim to fit.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by websterz
            I use heavy duty aluminum foil, fold to thickness and trim to fit.
            I just use plane old aluminum foil from the kitchen. Fold to thickness and trim.
            I don't even know what heavy duty aluminium foil is.
            I'm an abstract poet and I didn't even think I was.

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            • #7
              Did anyone ever see that commercial.... I don't even know what it was for, maybe Visa Card, anyhow... There is this guy talking to the bouncer, trying to get into a night club. He says he is Burt Reynolds and to let him in. The bouncer says, No way, you don't even look like Burt Reynolds. Some ladies slip by the bouncer and say, Hi Burt, and he gets in.
              He was Burt Reynolds owner of Reynolds Aluminum!

              --Doozer
              DZER

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              • #8
                So...in a nutshell, lots of people are using aluminum, I guess? OK, thanks! I guess I'm not so crazy cutting up my beer can.

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                • #9
                  The only thing about using aluminium is that it has a tendancy to cold flow, particularly in low alloy form.
                  Paul Compton
                  www.morini-mania.co.uk
                  http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                  • #10
                    Why so?

                    If you must use shimming, use hard brass sheet.
                    http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=e...&oq=brass+shim

                    I have both a Sieg X3 and Super X3 mill and in both cases the column is dead square to the table.

                    In both cases the column is precision-doweled to the mill base.

                    On the X3, the milling head is precision-doweled to the vertical dove-tail slider.

                    If the milling head dowels have been removed, there is some adjustment in the bolt hole clearances - for left-right adjustment and shimming.

                    It is possible to adjust/shim for forward/back ("nodding") as well.

                    I sometimes have to re-shim/re-align my vertical dove-tail column on my HF-45 mill and it is a PITA. It can be very "hit and miss". I am more inclined to adjust/shim at the milling head.

                    I am curious to know how and why the Sieg X3 column came to need re-alignment as I have two of them and I'd like to be warned in advance.

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                    • #11
                      I'd say brass or stainless. Mild steel can rust. Aluminum they issues mentioned and as far as spring steel well I'm just not sure about it. Now the big question. Do you have a shim punch? In a pinch a couple of pieces of flat CRS and a dowel pin faced square will work for just a few holes with out any heat treating. Just give the dowel maybe .0005 clearance
                      Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                      • #12
                        The mill/drills ship with beer and soda can slices as shims for the head. I still have a slice from what's clearly a Budweiser can from the shim in my RF-30. Just make sure the edges aren't crimped when you cut them.
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                        • #13
                          Plastic Shim Stock

                          I learned about this product about 20 or so years ago. We used it in the furniture factory to fine adjust the width of dado cutters and groovers. I've used it ever since, and have never had any reason to be unhappy with it. It's easy to cut with knife or scissors. The only drawback I've seen so far is that the thicker pieces are a bit brittle, and may break if being cut with arch punches. The color coding is handy, just don't lose the chart!

                          http://www.mcmaster.com/#9513k42/=4y0575

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Doozer
                            Did anyone ever see that commercial.... I don't even know what it was for, maybe Visa Card, anyhow... There is this guy talking to the bouncer, trying to get into a night club. He says he is Burt Reynolds and to let him in. The bouncer says, No way, you don't even look like Burt Reynolds. Some ladies slip by the bouncer and say, Hi Burt, and he gets in.
                            He was Burt Reynolds owner of Reynolds Aluminum!

                            --Doozer
                            That's an interesting and amusing story, but the owner of Reynolds Aluminum was named Richard.
                            (My dad worked at Reynolds Aluminum)
                            The tobacco magnate RJ Reynolds was the uncle of Richard (RS) Reynolds.

                            http://www.asbestos.net/job-sites/re...num-plant.html
                            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by john hobdeclipe
                              I learned about this product about 20 or so years ago. We used it in the furniture factory to fine adjust the width of dado cutters and groovers. I've used it ever since, and have never had any reason to be unhappy with it. It's easy to cut with knife or scissors. The only drawback I've seen so far is that the thicker pieces are a bit brittle, and may break if being cut with arch punches. The color coding is handy, just don't lose the chart!

                              http://www.mcmaster.com/#9513k42/=4y0575

                              I will second the plastic shim stock. I have used it for many years and it is very handy to be able to get the exact thickness you need.
                              I use a hole punch for paper to punch holes in it for screws, dowel pins, etc.

                              Brian
                              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                              THINK HARDER

                              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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