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Only just! (nearly one for the 'extra half inch' thread)

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  • Only just! (nearly one for the 'extra half inch' thread)

    I've got a 22.5" dia flywheel to turn a shoulder down for a starter ring gear.
    Customer told me it was 22". My lathe is a 19".




    I made an adapter to go straight in the spindle taper. The flywheel has double diameter locating shoulders.



    When first assembled onto the spindle (really pleased I put up that lifting beam!), the wheel was just rubbing against the back shear, but pulling up the drawbar good and tight pulled the taper in enough to give clearance. There's about 1mm clearance on the front shear.



    It wouldn't have been possible to fit the wheel the other way round, so had to set up a boring bar to cut at the back of the wheel



    Running at 20 rpm, with the tailstock pushed up for extra security.

    There was a 'plan B', to cut the shoulder on the mill with a rotary table, I've done a heavier wheel before that way so know it can be done.

    Just waiting for confirmation of the dimensions now from the ring gear suppliers.

    Tim

  • #2
    PHEE-EEW! Another coat of paint and you'd have been in trouble

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    • #3
      So how much is that cuss going to grow as it warms up?

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      • #4
        Tim , its a good feeling when ya think outside the box and it works out...probably more fun than plan "B" too!
        I had a 40''or so long shaft that would not pass into My spindle that needed threads on each end. I used a steady rest and boring bar like Your set up on the other end of the lathe to accomplish the task, 36'' lathe. I wish I'd had a camera at the time.

        Steve

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        • #5
          Hmm, well, I have seen people grind the ways for clearance for jobs like that and since it is close to the chuck it's not likely to hurt the lathe in any way. I would grind away enough metal on the ways to clear the flywheel just where it may rub.

          I have a gap bed lathe but have found that is seldom good because it exceeds the actual capacity of the lathe and chatter will raise it's ugly head. The times I have tried to use the gap did not work out very well not to mention that I don't like to take the gap part out.

          I just made some sleeves that will be three secton collets for a welding table out of a tube that was 7" long x about 8+ OD. I had to use a boring bar to turn the ID to size and then another boring bar to turn the OD because the tube would not go over the crossfeed table. When I parted the sleeve off it barely cleared the crossfeed table and chattered like crazy. I had to get two 3" long sleeves from that tube and it was interesting.
          It's only ink and paper

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Carld
            Hmm, well, I have seen people grind the ways for clearance for jobs like that and since it is close to the chuck it's not likely to hurt the lathe in any way. I would grind away enough metal on the ways to clear the flywheel just where it may rub.
            I was fully prepared to grind the corner off the rear way, it would only have needed a whisker taken off if pulling the drawbar up tight hadn't given me some clearance and would have done no harm at all. Again, just taking the edge off the front shear probably wouldn't matter but I haven't studied that as is wasn't needed.
            There's enough clearance now to run the job, if it starts rubbing it'll be a clue that there's something wrong
            I don't expect to get the job hot enough that expansion will cause a problem!

            Tim

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