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  • Tinkerer
    replied
    Originally posted by vincemulhollon
    Thank you all for the interesting ideas. I have plenty to think about and google for.

    Boucher, Tinkerer, I would have to solder/epoxy the carriage bolt head to the aluminum "foot" before tightening the nut on the other side (which it tightening against wood) I like the turnbuckle idea... Maybe if I modify the hole in the aluminum to "squareish" via broach or files, or since its steel vs aluminum, a slightly oversize square bolt could be pushed into place.
    No need to square up the hole. The square portion on carriage bolts really are tapered and will swedge itself to shape easily in aluminum. I've used them to attach roof and fascia mounted signs with 2x4 pieces spanning joists or rafters just use a large fender washer will stop compression. If you want just pre-swedge the holes... just take some 3/4" pipe and slip over the bolt and tighten it up. Back off the nut and tap the bolt loose. When you attach your tripod thingy on the roof the bolt head will fit into the pocket and will not spin. Remember to put some thin rubber like pond liner under the angle along with some roof coat this will keep it from cutting thru the shingles over time.

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  • whitis
    replied
    While you can make a bolt with hex, socket, slot, or holes on the threaded end, they are difficult to find as off the shelf items. Unfortunately, the term double headed bolt, which would be a logical name for such a fastener, has been misused for other fasteners that do not have two heads.

    For a one off deal, you might put a nut on the bolt after it is in place and hand tighten it, then add two more nuts jammed together to allow you to hold the bolt in place while you tighten the first nut.

    Frequently the problem of access from one side only is solved by using a threaded hole and a regular bolt from the bottom, captive nuts, or nut plates.

    Hanger bolts. Step bolts and Elevator bolts resemble carriage bolts. Some studs may have a flat for tightening. There are studs used in applications like carburetors that have a hex socket in one end, basically a long set screw. Some male-male standoffs are like a stud with a hex section in the middle. set screws can be had in 2" to 3" lengths.

    Some bolts may have a hole drilled in the end for safety wire or cotter pins that could perhaps be used with a tommy bar or spanner to hold the bolt while tightening the nut. Normally for use with castellated nuts.

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  • cuemaker
    replied
    Originally posted by vincemulhollon
    Cuemaker, a "Lindapter Hollo-Bolt" is exactly, perfectly, precisely what I'm looking for.
    What do I win?!?!?

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Grinding flats or a hex on the end of the bolt may work, but I wouldn't use common grade 3 bolts as these flats would round off rather quickly. A grade 5 or even a grade 8 would be a lot better.

    However, I would likely use a pair of nuts on the end of each one. Add two nuts with some Loctite and torque the nuts together with about 50% more torque than you plan to use on the bolts. Then, when the Loctite is dry, you can torque the bolt using the outer nut. This should work with any grade of hardware.

    I am not sure how you would assemble this. It soulds like a bad design that needs to be re-thought.

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  • rockrat
    replied
    While I can't tell you the best item for your application (only you can do that) I will add that I have tightened one of those T nuts with the prongs and pulled it part way into a piece of wood. The prongs did not bend and while I don't know if the threads have any rating what so ever, I didn't strip the threads.

    This same thing can happen with a carriage bolt or a normal bolt with a washer.

    Beyond that, let us know what you come up with. I'm curious to see your outcome. And if you find the name of the bolt your looking for please share.

    Good luck.

    rock~

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  • vincemulhollon
    replied
    Thanks for ideas...

    Thank you all for the interesting ideas. I have plenty to think about and google for.

    Camdigger, other way around... head on both ends not thread on both ends

    Mike B, that is very close but not quite it, as I need a way to tighten it with only access to one side.

    Boucher, Tinkerer, I would have to solder/epoxy the carriage bolt head to the aluminum "foot" before tightening the nut on the other side (which it tightening against wood) I like the turnbuckle idea... Maybe if I modify the hole in the aluminum to "squareish" via broach or files, or since its steel vs aluminum, a slightly oversize square bolt could be pushed into place.

    CarlD, I think #1 would simply fall out of the hole. #2 or #3 would work. Maybe the best answer is "Then you ask for a bolt with an internal hex or slot in the end with no indication where the threads are located." The point is I have to tighten a bolt clamping aluminum to wood and after assembly I only have convenient access to one side.

    Rockrat, your struts sound exactly correct but I'm looking for something smaller and cheaper than 4 struts. As for "make a few" I agree its sounds like that. I didn't want to spend an evening or two bodging something up to avoid the cost of a cup of coffee, but for the cost of 4 struts, I'll grind away in the basement for awhile.

    Cuemaker, a "Lindapter Hollo-Bolt" is exactly, perfectly, precisely what I'm looking for. NOW I know what to google for. If its strong enough for "primary steelwork" it'll work for me, and if its cheap enough for "cable tray" I can afford it. Perfect! As for slip on lock nuts, that is very interesting, but I'd need a way to put the bolt under tension before I tighten the locknut, not impossible, but not ideal.

    Rockrat has it for single digit ft-lbs of torque, but I think I could fold those little tines right over if I really crank it down, which I intend to do... That makes me think of silver soldering some spikes on a hex nut... that might work. Its probably a balance between strongly attaching the "spikes" vs ruining the metalurgy.

    Your Old Dog, I only wish it were a Apr 1st problem. Sometimes that is the most educational part, how the heck did I ever get myself into this jam.

    Snowman, yes pretty much a homemade version of my idea of a screw with two hex heads. Hard part is installing the nut after installing the screw. One is on one side of the roof, the other is in the attic, neither really ideal welding locations.

    Bill Pace, yes good point I don't need to buy $$$$$$$ brand new shocks, junk yard will work.

    Joe CB, interesting, I need to think on that. That might work.

    DougA, Beanbag, yes I can make it, and probably will. I was surprised nothing this "obvious" has a common name ("Lindapter Hollo-Bolt" is not a common name) and is available for $1 online....

    DP, CarlD, Darryl 100% on that drafting. Exactly what I want to buy for $1. Dimension it to 5/16 or 3/8 or whatever dia it is, make it about half a foot long, and thats what I'll be making in my basement sometime soon, I guess.

    Winchman, jmm360, unthreaded "blind" hole, access to both sides before assembly, but only one end after assembly, I can easily turn one end, while the other spins merrily away without tightening... And I intend to really crank it down, and I need to be able to remove it, so epoxy is out. Winchman's 7:36 post is pretty much 100% right except for attaching something to the outside of the ceiling (the roof) vs the inside (like a fan). Long story there.

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  • winchman
    replied
    On second thought, maybe he's putting the bolts through something that he's going to attach to the ceiling. He can't hold the heads after it's up there, so he needs to hold the threaded end as he tightens the nuts.

    Roger
    Last edited by winchman; 12-22-2009, 09:39 AM.

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  • jmm360
    replied
    If there's room to insert a 3/8x6 bolt down through the top how is there not room to get a wrench on the head?

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  • dp
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeCB
    Yep' that's the picture I got too... hence my suggestion to use a long allen setscrew and a nut or maybe nut and jam nut. Saves cutting the hex
    Joe B
    eYep - that's the way the wedge on my vise is restrained. Works nicely.

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  • winchman
    replied
    I don't think he wants a hex head on the far end. I got the impression he wants to thread the screw into a blind hole the desired distance, and then hold the screw while he puts on the nut and tightens it.

    The longest set screw I can find in 3/8" is five inches. He needs it to be six.

    Roger

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  • JoeCB
    replied
    Yep' that's the picture I got too... hence my suggestion to use a long allen setscrew and a nut or maybe nut and jam nut. Saves cutting the hex
    Joe B

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  • dp
    replied
    Originally posted by darryl
    Hey, that looks like a bolt with some of the threads on the end ground into a hex-
    That's just what I thought, too!

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  • darryl
    replied
    Hey, that looks like a bolt with some of the threads on the end ground into a hex-

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  • Carld
    replied
    dp, I was thinking the same type as you drew but, well, who knows but him.

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  • dp
    replied
    This is the image I get from the OP's description. Hex head at both ends and the nut can pass over one end:

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