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another bandsaw question...brushes

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  • another bandsaw question...brushes

    My Kysor/ Johnson Model B apparently never came with brushes. Is this a critical omission? Or is it not a big deal? I could probably fab something up, if it's important. What are the brushes usually made of?...nylon, plastic, or some natural fiber? If it matters, I'll probably use the saw dry, at least in the colder months.
    Thanks,
    Jim

  • #2
    toothbrushes work well in most cases. The handles do a fair job of holding screws, and most can be heated and bent to a suitable shape for positioning.

    Ken.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kendall
      toothbrushes work well in most cases. The handles do a fair job of holding screws, and most can be heated and bent to a suitable shape for positioning.

      Ken.
      As simple as that, huh? Many thanks, Ken, that shouldn't be too tough to rig up.
      Jim

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      • #4
        My Wilton uses a common 2" fine wire brush -- the kind with a round arbor for mounting in a drill chuck. The blade rolls through the brush, which is free to spin. The wire brushes are cheap at MSC, Enco et al.

        I'd be curious how a toothbrush makes out when the blade gets hot
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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        • #5
          If you blade is getting hot enough to melt nylon toothbrush bristles, you have other problems with your sawing.

          --Doozer
          DZER

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lazlo
            My Wilton uses a common 2" fine wire brush -- the kind with a round arbor for mounting in a drill chuck. The blade rolls through the brush, which is free to spin. The wire brushes are cheap at MSC, Enco et al.

            I'd be curious how a toothbrush makes out when the blade gets hot
            Lazlo, I like that even more. The wire should be more durable. I'll probably try a toothbrush, or other fiber brush, for now as it's too cold in the shop to fab up what I'd need for the wire wheel holder. That job will be something for nice weather. I wonder if mounting a wheel on each side of the blade, and maybe at, say, a 45* angle, would still allow the wheel to spin, but increase the cleaning action?
            Jim

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Doozer
              If you blade is getting hot enough to melt nylon toothbrush bristles, you have other problems with your sawing.

              --Doozer
              Lol...I'll tell you one thing I found out about the newer toothbrushes. I get my teeth cleaned every 6 months, as does the wife, and they always give us a little "travel pack' that includes a brush, toothpaste and floss. We end up with more of them than we can use, so I started stealing the toothbrushes for shop cleaners. The last 4 I tried absolutely "fell apart" the instant they hit gasoline.
              Yeah, I know, I'm not supposed to using gasoline for cleaning, but after 50+ years of it, I can't help myself...LOL. But man, those brushes instantly puked...nothing but the bristles in the bottom of the can.
              Jim

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              • #8
                The Kysor I have repaired had a driven chip brush. There was a flexible shaft that came from the drive wheel I believe. The best chip brush I've seen is on the Hyd-Mech saws. Urethane wheel rides on the drive wheel and turns a shaft the wheel is mounted on. You can turn a set screw to bring the wheel closer to the blade as it wears. I don't care much for the none powered wheels. In high chip removal applications they never seem to do the job. I have another customer whose chip brush is simply a wire scratch brush held to the saw with vise grips. seems to work ok for him.

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                • #9
                  Not much doubt, a driven brush would be the best way to go...or a pair of brushes. Probably the easiest way to accomplish that from scratch is just a small motor mounted on the blade guide...at least for a single brush. Wired up in parallel with the main motor.
                  I rebuilt the coolant pump on this saw, but may end up not using it, due to having a cold shop in the winter. The drive sprocket for the pump is there, and I bought a new chain for it....might could rig up a drive for the brush from that.
                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    No need to drive the brush if it is set up properly. Use a cup shaped brush mounted on a shaft. Mount the brush so the blade contacts one edge and turns the brush as the blade moves past it.The face of the brush should angle away from the blade slightly and be mostly below the blade. As the blade moves past the brush, the brush will move toward the edge of the blade and drag the chips off.
                    North Central Arkansas

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                    • #11
                      Re: Blade brushes

                      The Kalamazoo saw we had at work had a little wire frame that held two 1" square pieces of canvas backing with stiff wire bristles facing one another. The blade ran between the bristles and knocked off any chips that hung in the teeth. The brushes looked like the same material that is on an old file card. They were a standard replacement item and I ordered them from Kalamazoo on several occasions. IIRC six pairs was something like $25 and their minimum order was $20.
                      Jim (KB4IVH)

                      Only fools abuse their tools.

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