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Looking for plans for disc sander angle table

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  • Looking for plans for disc sander angle table

    Guys,

    I have a 12" disc sander that is basically just a 2 HP motor with 12" steel disc attached to its shaft.
    I want to build an adjustable angle table for it. If you have seen and can point me to any plans or pictures of DIY table like that I'll appreciate it.


    BTW I have only a lathe and no mill right now.

  • #2
    Did a simple one that has worked good for me.
    The adjustable table is not bolted to the base.




    A simple hold down bolt allows table to be removed for replacing sanding disk and for adjusting cleanance between table and sanding disk. Quick and easy to do. Easy to get minimum clearance between table and sanding disk.







    For adjusting table angle to sanding disk make up some simple templates.
    Can draw them on the computer and paste to template. Cut and sand to computer drawn lines.

    Comment


    • #3
      Gary, thanks for posting the pics. However, I would caution that the pivot point is way too far from the disc. As you angle the table, the distance to the the sanding disc and the height where the work touches the disc changes drastically. May work ok for very small angles like the 2 degree one shown but is a problem for larger angles.

      I realize the base of your sander gets in the way and you may have used a scavenged casting with pivot holes in the wrong place and other scrap on hand. But since people copy things without necessarily understanding the pertinent details, I thought I would point these out so people can evaluate the trade offs for their own situation.

      If you had used cantilevered triangles or parallelograms for the uprights, you could have put the pivot point near the disc. The table is cantilevered, anyway. The miter clamp would then be reversed and connect near the corner of one of the triangles or, better yet, on a 45 degree angle to the normal plane of the table which allows a 90 degree clamp to be used for +/-45. Also, the slot where it bolts to the base should have more adjustment towards and away from the blade to compensate for the small remaining displacement when tilting the table.

      It is common for the table to have ears which extend around behind the disc on each side. These are handy, for example, when grinding/sanding something like the side edge of a lathe cutting tool. They also allow the pivot point to be closer to the disc. The required mitered cutout shape could be cut from the back side of the plate with a 45 degree end mill on a milling machine or with a regular end mill and the work clamped at a 45 degree angle.

      if making the miter clamp from scratch, make it from a full section of disc rather than an annular ring and put one on each side.

      With or without the ears, the table is a bit tricky to make on just a small lathe, though it can be done. If a bandsaw is available, that could be used to rough in the 45 degree edge and the sander itself could be used for finishing. The slot for the miter gage can be cut with an endmill clamped in the lathe spindle with a little creative clamping of the table to the cross slide. Since cross slide travel is limited, a little step and repeat could be used with an undersized endmill and touched up with a file. But you might find it easier to use the additive method of laminating plates together to make the slot.

      If your metalworking ability is limited, a serviceable table can be made from wood (well treated to resist humidity induced warping), MDF, or HDPE (cutting board) but not as good as a metal table:
      http://books.google.com/books?id=CfY...age&q=&f=false
      Link is actually a disc sanding attachment for a wood lathe.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you guys for your input.
        My lathe is 12x36 and I do have metal band saw.

        BTW I found a good example of disc sander table
        http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCDiscSander3.htm

        I like how this one made. Not sure if I cam make circular slots in cantilevers without a mill.

        Last edited by AlexK; 12-24-2009, 09:30 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          theres lots of ways you can make an angular adjustment mechanism

          You could have two linkages that form an L's that collapse to change length, tighten 3 bolts to 'secure' it

          You could have a threaded rod with pivots on each end, and 2 nuts on each side of the 'pivot' flange to hold the rod securely.

          You could have a half disk (Make a whole disk in lathe, cut in half on bandsaw), and a ledge clamp like http://www.gorillagrip.net/ledge_clampir.gif that grabs onto the half disk from the base of the table, sorta like how some rotary tables operate. http://www.workholding.com/ABS-YUASA...TARY-TABLE.jpg Note the little clamp that goes into the 'grove' on the rotary table

          Or you could just have the rod the table pivots on be threaded, and just tighten the bolts on each end to 'pinch' the mounting flanges against the table, Its not super secure but should be stiff enough. I have a 3' long arm based on this style of joints and it can hold 5~lbs extended with only a 1 1/2"~ contact area extended, and much more when contracted (less leverage)
          (Hint, make your mounting flange out of a thin material like 1/8" so that the nut has little trouble pinching it against the table, the tables mounting points as thick and as sturdy as you can make them so they don't flex at all) , and use a thick rod like 1/2"+ so you can REALLY torque it down).

          Funny thing when I got my mill and rotary table, I thought 'Awsome now I can finaly mill slots and circular slots for angle and height adjustment mechanisms!' So far I still havent made one yet.

          You can make the slot with a router, if your making an aluminum table btw. Id recommend trying to find a hard alloy of aluminum to use however, I have a small bench grinder with soft aluminum tool rests and they are so soft your fingernail could likey dent it.

          Come to think of it, with a circle attachment (see bar + pin) you could router out the C shaped adjustment slot in aluminum as well.
          Last edited by Black_Moons; 12-24-2009, 10:36 PM.
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by AlexK
            BTW I found a good example of disc sander table
            http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCDiscSander3.htm

            I like how this one made.

            Wow, that's really nice. Who made that?
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lazlo
              Wow, that's really nice. Who made that?
              Dickeybird. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=27032

              Should have been a magazine project.

              Comment


              • #8
                When building belt sanders I look thru this site for ideas
                http://gonza-rytec.rajce.idnes.cz/brusky/#album

                Comment


                • #9
                  Quote:
                  "I would caution that the pivot point is way too far from the disc. As you angle the table, the distance to the sanding disc and the height where the work touches the disc changes drastically. May work ok for very small angles like the 2 degree one shown but is a problem for larger angles."



                  Guess I'm poor at explaining things. The pivot point on method showed has nothing to do with the clearance. First the angle is adjusted to what you want. Say 45 degrees and the table is one inch from the sanding disk.

                  You just loosen the single bolt holding table and tilt mechanism to sander base and slide forward to zero clearance and align with sanding disk. It is that simple.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AlexK
                    I like how this one made. Not sure if I cam make circular slots in cantilevers without a mill.[/IMG]
                    Thanks Alex, you won't regret making yourself a disk sander. It's one of my most used tools now.

                    In answer to your question re: the adjusting struts, here's a quote from the build thread. I had a mill & a rotary table when I built them but this way's way faster:

                    "I just glued the CAD drawing of the part onto the aluminum with super glue then rough cut them on the bandsaw. I sanded them to shape with the disc sander itself (just tightened the table bolts real tight and went slow) and a drum sander in the drill press for the concave curves. Then I soaked the paper in nitromethane until the glue dissolved. The slots were 1st chain-drilled, then some more gnawed off with a rotary file in the drill press and the last little bit by hand with a small file and a fine rattail. Poor man's CAD/CAM."
                    Milton

                    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by teejay
                      When building belt sanders I look thru this site for ideas
                      http://gonza-rytec.rajce.idnes.cz/brusky/#album
                      HOLY CRAP!! This guy has it going on with the sanders...is this a Russian site or something.....the script looks like it....great many ideas on this site...thanks,

                      BigMo

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mohead1
                        HOLY CRAP!! This guy has it going on with the sanders...is this a Russian site or something.....the script looks like it....great many ideas on this site...thanks,

                        BigMo
                        The .CZ domain is a little clue, look it up.
                        Paul Compton
                        www.morini-mania.co.uk
                        http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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