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No Q, no point, no issue, no prob.....just for your viewing pleasure :)

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  • No Q, no point, no issue, no prob.....just for your viewing pleasure :)

    squaring up a cast iron bar, finish size around 1.5 x1.5 a foot and a bit long. 1/8 DOC which is nothing for Elliot, didn't even sigh let alone groan

    I'm really liking that horizontal mill.....best $250 i ever spent








    So if you're getting some shop time in this week, throw up some pics.......
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-29-2009, 05:55 PM.
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

  • #2
    Fantastic

    I'll post an update on scraping when I get back to school (I left my card reader behind). I've enjoyed my recent foray into the world of scraping/cast iron. I'd never done anything in CI before, but I made up that little "master" out of some scrap. It was a lot of fun. Your post makes me think I need to find some more CI to play with ... only I don't have one of those fancy horizontal mills. Maybe next year

    Where did you get your CI bar from?

    p.s. I like the "vise"

    Comment


    • #3
      .. only I don't have one of those fancy horizontal mills. Maybe next year
      next year is doable......just put away $5 every paycheck

      CI came from Terra Nova iron and steel....probably the biggest cast iron distributor in Canada
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

      Comment


      • #4
        Looks good, cant wait for the weather to improve a little so i can get mine running, what RPM were you using?
        regards
        mark

        Comment


        • #5
          Which horizontal is that? Is it a universal?
          By the way, I like your shop-made angle-irons
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

          Comment


          • #6
            Darn nice unit Mcgyver, and for $250 you stole it.

            If you still feel guilty I can relieve you of that guilt and double your money at the same time.

            Lazlo,as you may recall, this was Mcgyver's post about the Elliot's homecoming.

            http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=33982
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories‚Äč

            Location: British Columbia

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking good,so that's what those parallel clamps are for.I always thought they were toolbox decorations
              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #8
                rpm is about 100 irrc, couple of inches a minute feed. That angle plate came out of Bertram (they did P&W tools under license) by one of there masters...i've a bunch of this guys tooling and he was good, maybe the best i'v seen. I guess you have to be if you're making all the ground go/no go gauges for taps and dies. Its very nicely ground all over, he must have stress relived it. Its pretty big, 10x5, biggest in my shop anyway. The machinist clamp are by yours truly and the stacked 1 2 3 under work for support are 4 shop made ground and hardened ones by a retired T&D and who sold me some of his stuff.

                I forgot about the other Elliot thread, at the time i was trying to figure out power. I ended up making a 10hp rotary phase converter then stepping up to 600V via a 240/600 transformer. Based on rms meter itis well balanced, at least the machines haven't complained

                I was in a guy's shop in Detroit a few weeks ago - had a monster, 12k lbs or something vertical mill, I think a K&T. Elliot looks little in comparison, weighs around 3700 (? John, do you know?) but using it gives that good feeling of how easy material removal becomes with horsepower and mass.

                Robert, mill is the non-universal version of Sir John's....they badged Victorias as Elliots in North America.

                Oh yeah, the story on Elliot was that a in house machine shop servicing a large research lab had a lathe and mill the wanted gone. Someone who worked there said they'd take them.....but he didn't have room for the mill....said i could have it if i paid his cost for transporting the lathe, which i did, $250. The lathe btw was a 10ee with all the fixin's
                Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-29-2009, 11:51 PM.
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                Comment


                • #9
                  A great machine.

                  Originally posted by lazlo
                  Which horizontal is that? Is it a universal?
                  By the way, I like your shop-made angle-irons
                  Lazlo.

                  Elliot = Victoria - same as John Stevenson's except that (I think) that John's is a universal.

                  That Elliot of Mcgyver's is not a universal as far as I can see (no table pivot/"swing").

                  They are a great small shop machine - solid as hell.

                  They are not young either as the last time I used one was circa 1960 and it wasn't new then. I used it in a shop I was in at the time. Put that vertical milling-head that Mcgyver was lucky enough to get as well as a very good slotting attachment and you had a pretty well complete milling station/machine.

                  I'd buy one tomorrow if it came up for sale here. I'd even get rid of my much-loved HF-45 to make room for it - but I'd keep the Sieg X3's.

                  They were almost as common in Trade Schools as the small SB's (and their clones) were.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well done

                    Originally posted by Mcgyver
                    rpm is about 100 irrc, couple of inches a minute feed. That angle plate came out of Bertram (they did P&W tools under license) by one of there masters...i've a bunch of this guys tooling and he was good, maybe the best i'v seen. I guess you have to be if you're making all the ground go/no go gauges for taps and dies. Its very nicely ground all over, he must have stress relived it. Its pretty big, 10x5, biggest in my shop anyway. The machinist clamp are by yours truly and the stacked 1 2 3 under work for support are 4 shop made ground and hardened ones by a retired T&D and who sold me some of his stuff.

                    I forgot about the other Elliot thread, at the time i was trying to figure out power. I ended up making a 10hp rotary phase converter then stepping up to 600V via a 240/600 transformer. Based on rms meter itis well balanced, at least the machines haven't complained

                    I was in a guy's shop in Detroit a few weeks ago - had a monster, 12k lbs or something vertical mill, I think a K&T. Elliot looks little in comparison, weighs around 3700 (? John, do you know?) but using it gives that good feeling of how easy material removal becomes with horsepower and mass.

                    Robert, mill is the non-universal version of Sir John's....they badged Victorias as Elliots in North America.

                    Oh yeah, the story on Elliot was that a in house machine shop servicing a large research lab had a lathe and mill the wanted gone. Someone who worked there said they'd take them.....but he didn't have room for the mill....said i could have it if i paid his cost for transporting the lathe, which i did, $250. The lathe btw was a 10ee with all the fixin's
                    Sorry Mcgyver.

                    I opened a reply and left it open while I went away and did something else before I came back to it and so I "crossed wires".

                    I didn't see your post until I went back tot his thread.

                    Anyway, I "went looking" on Google and here is what I got. I hope it is of some interest.

                    You have done very well indeed!

                    http://www.lathes.co.uk/victoria/

                    http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=e...ctoria+milling

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pp2MVowKsOc

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mcgyver
                      Robert, mill is the non-universal version of Sir John's....they badged Victorias as Elliots in North America.

                      Oh yeah, the story on Elliot was that a in house machine shop servicing a large research lab had a lathe and mill the wanted gone. Someone who worked there said they'd take them.....but he didn't have room for the mill....said i could have it if i paid his cost for transporting the lathe, which i did, $250. The lathe btw was a 10ee with all the fixin's
                      Snap, or nearly.
                      Mine came out of a pipe fitting shop, they had the fixed vertical head on it [ no quill ] and were using it to spot face flange castings.

                      Once they were buying these in instead of making them the mill became obsolete and when they came to move premises it wasn't wanted.
                      I heard about it on the Thursday as they were finally out on the Friday so I paid £100 for it and they rolled it into the car park on Friday morning and shut the doors.

                      Friday dinner time I got a scrap man to pick it up with a skip truck and bring it round, only 1/2 mile away.

                      These are brilliant machines for their size, I was going to change mine for a larger model but to get bigger travels than I have you have to move up two sizes of machine because the Elliot / Victoria / Butler [ much badge engineering at this time ] has very long bed travels.

                      Mc,
                      Not sure what the weight is but they aren't that heavy, mine was collected on a small skip truck and it handled it fine, the same truck when collecting my CVA [10EE clone ] had to have it's support legs down to prevent tipping, not so with the Victoria.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by John Stevenson

                        Mc,
                        Not sure what the weight is but they aren't that heavy, mine was collected on a small skip truck and it handled it fine, the same truck when collecting my CVA [10EE clone ] had to have it's support legs down to prevent tipping, not so with the Victoria.
                        From the Elliott manual, net weight of U2 & P2 is 1422 kg, not clear whether that's the 'dry' weight, but near enough 1 1/2 tons.
                        I had an O2 which was the 'Omnimil' version with a vertical turret head in addition to the horizontal, traded up to the later 'Sturdimil-Omnimil' which is taller & heavier but based around the same table, I reckon that's about 2 tons.

                        Third pic down on
                        http://www.lathes.co.uk/elliottmillers/page10.html

                        Great machines for a small shop.

                        Tim

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Horizontals are amazingly versatile machines. My no-name Swiss Universal takes cuts like that without a trace of discomfort in stainless steel or 4045 as well as mild steel.



                          It can be used as a drill



                          It also makes a nice lathe for form cutting.



                          And, it doesn't take a lot of space.

                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Nice work McGyver, Elliot horizontals are sturdy machines, Surprised you managed to cut your bar with out an end stop, to hold against reaction from cutter, and it held down with just toolmakers clamps
                            Your finish looks excellent.

                            My Elliot OO was also a bargain, came out of a hospital artificial limbs dept, Has all the toys dividing head, slotting head etc, Like yours the price was right, Although as a machine it is not in the same league as your model as regards usability, I always think compared to the more industrial /production machines like yours it has a cheap utility feel to it.
                            Last edited by oil mac; 12-30-2009, 10:04 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That nice Elliot, and its slab mill, would enjoy a nice constant cutting oil feed, would greatly increase the life of the tool.

                              I use Re-li-on, I buy it when on sale cause its expensive, but it works great and does not stain some materials like the cheaper dark sulfur based oils. A big plus is it doesn't just evaporate like water based, nor does it ever go rancid and stink, and nothing will ever rust!
                              James Kilroy

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